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Help: Cutek Exteme on Sienna Brown PT

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  • May 18th, 2021 10:16 am
[OP]
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Feb 12, 2007
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Mississauga

Help: Cutek Exteme on Sienna Brown PT

We installed our Sienna Brown PT deck in May 2020. Although we had the best of intentions, we did not get to seal the deck last summer. As my husband and I have to avoid the chemical exposure, we hired someone to do the sealing for us.

After reading that Cutek is the best, we purchased Cutek Extreme and a few cans of Colourtone to possibly mix in.
The deck finishers sanded the surfaces: horiztonal (belt sander) and vertical (by hand) as we had replaced a few boards that were severely cracked even after one year. This way we were pretty certain the surface would be even, moisture meter tested each board as ready to go.

After testing samples with colourtone and without on a few boards, we settled on the CLEAR.

Here is a picture after about 18 hours of the ONE coat of CLEAR Cutek Extreme applied with a deck brush:

Deck One Coat Cutek.jpg

I am concerned by the splotchy, blotchy finish.

2 QUESTIONS:
1. Do we apply the second coat as CLEAR or do we add a COLOURTONE to help even out the tone/finish?
2. Should he use the lambswool brush I had purchased instead?

I have called every deck store I can find that sells this product to get some guidance, but no such luck.
Home Hardware says the PT material is not allowing the oil to penetrate. That is inconsistent with the Cutek website that says re: being able to apply right away. I don't this this person knew what he was talking about.
Anyway, if someone can help us make a decision to allow us to finish this project today, that would be stellar.

Thank you in advance,
T
20 replies
Deal Addict
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Feb 25, 2015
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York Region
If you put only clear, then those "splotchy" areas are exactly how the boards were sanded. If you add colourtone, it would still show the uneven sanding but not as much.

You also need to apply a second coat.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2013
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I am not a pro painter, but it looks like the stain and color have not been mixed properly, over a poorly application method, possibly with the wrong tools but that's my opinion. Also, isN,t it too cold overnight to stain a deck? My guess is this is too early in the season. Do not put clear over this (if you don't like it) because it will still be splotchy blotchy

I'd try a second coat, evenly applied, to top it, applied with an appropriate brush. Do not cheap out on the brush, this is what apply the finish. Read your stain instructions, there may bey a delay between 2 coats like within 12 or 48 hours.
[OP]
Newbie
Feb 12, 2007
31 posts
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Mississauga
bacalhau4me wrote: If you put only clear, then those "splotchy" areas are exactly how the boards were sanded. If you add colourtone, it would still show the uneven sanding but not as much.

You also need to apply a second coat.
Got it.
First coat is clear.

I am going to add in half a Chestnut Colourtone to the next can of Cutek Extreme for the second coat to darken it up a bit and try to oven it up.
[OP]
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Feb 12, 2007
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Mississauga
DoorCrasher wrote: I am not a pro painter, but it looks like the stain and color have not been mixed properly, over a poorly application method, possibly with the wrong tools but that's my opinion. Also, isN,t it too cold overnight to stain a deck? My guess is this is too early in the season. Do not put clear over this (if you don't like it) because it will still be splotchy blotchy

I'd try a second coat, evenly applied, to top it, applied with an appropriate brush. Do not cheap out on the brush, this is what apply the finish. Read your stain instructions, there may bey a delay between 2 coats like within 12 or 48 hours.
Thank you. Temperature has been sunny and 20 degrees where I am for the last two days, around 5-6 degrees at night. Cutek says you can apply at 5 degrees and up, considering you will need extra time to 'dry'.

I am literally watching the same guy I am using do a different deck down the street and he is using Cutek Extreme with Cedartone colourtone mixed in and it is perfect, no blotches. He did the exact same process as my house yesterday.

We are over 24 hours now since the first coat. He will be coming back tomorrow to do the second coat with a half tin of Chestnut mixed in.
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Oct 19, 2008
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taliaa wrote: I am literally watching the same guy I am using do a different deck down the street and he is using Cutek Extreme with Cedartone colourtone mixed in and it is perfect, no blotches. He did the exact same process as my house yesterday.
Hope the colour tone helps but I agree with poster above-you are seeing sanding marks. Did the guy also take a belt sander to your neighbours deck? Its best to use a random orbit sander after the belt sander, I would just use 60 grit with a random orbit sander and then finer grit sandpaper with the random orbit sander.
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Aug 12, 2010
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Beyond the sanding did they wash the surface with a deck cleaner?
[OP]
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Feb 12, 2007
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Mississauga
BornToSave wrote: Beyond the sanding did they wash the surface with a deck cleaner?
No he did not wash it with anything. He used a blower to remove the debris. The deck looked great before he started applying the stain.
[OP]
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Feb 12, 2007
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Mississauga
Zamboni wrote: Hope the colour tone helps but I agree with poster above-you are seeing sanding marks. Did the guy also take a belt sander to your neighbours deck? Its best to use a random orbit sander after the belt sander, I would just use 60 grit with a random orbit sander and then finer grit sandpaper with the random orbit sander.
I apologize for my ignorance. He used a square stand up sander he plugged in. He also did the vertical areas by hand. I’m super stressed the colourtone is not going to work to even things out.

Yes he used the exact same process on the neighbour’s deck however their wood is an older cedar.
Newbie
Mar 1, 2017
86 posts
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The other thing to know about Cutek is if you do clear the wood will still grey.
When we did our fences last year we didn’t like any of their colour samples so we picked the one we liked best and use 1/3 a can of tone in each gallon and it turned out perfect. Cutek can take days to dry. Our fences took a week for each coat to fully soak in and dry. This spring they still look amazing. On a deck you will have to wait before foot traffic. I would also say right now it is too cool to use Cutek.
[OP]
Newbie
Feb 12, 2007
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Mississauga
Here is the finished product, 1 year old MicroPro Sienna Brown. We are in Ontario.

In case anyone is interested in our (somewhat stressful) experience, we did the following:
  • SANDING of vertical surfaces by hand, horizontal surfaces with a belt sander
  • BLOWER to clear the deck of any debris or dust
  • FIRST COAT - CLEAR Cutek Extreme applied with Deck Boss brush
  • Let dry for almost 48 hours (but it was dry after 24 hours)
  • SECOND COAT - Cutek Extreme with ONE TIN of CHESTNUT Colourtone applied with Deck Boss brush
There results are far more red than we wanted. Perhaps if we had done Chestnut Colourtone for both coats it would show up darker. We chose Chestnut because of the samples we saw online and on RedFlagDeals, etc.

The moral of the story is:
NEW Sienna Pro Brown does NOT need to be sanded down. This is made clear on the Cutek site and videos.
Simply apply the Cutek Finish and it will be a nice brown tone that will silver eventually, but this is the process to lock in the original colour if that is what you like.

Wish I had challenged our deck finisher more but I trusted his expertise.
Hope this helps someone.
Images
  • Deck Finished.jpg
Deal Addict
Mar 22, 2017
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Looks like uneven sanding and improper cleaning to me. Decks are notoriously tough to sand due to the boards not being perfectly flat - some of that unevenness doesn't show up until after you apply the stain, as it highlights the deck grain. You are correct that a new deck that was not previously stained does not typically require sanding - sanding is done to repair a damaged surface or to remove a previous, film-forming stain. It does require cleaning, as the deck is outside and will get dirty quickly - a clean surface is important for even and effective staining.

For what it's worth, I think your deck with the chestnut tone looks GREAT. If you dislike the colour, it will fade over the summer as wear, rain and UV will soften it up. I don't see much red in the picture, but it may look different in person.
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Oct 6, 2010
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I stained my deck one year, two years later, pressure washer destroyed it, lol. Great job, I think it looks great.
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Feb 26, 2019
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It looks good, don’t sweat it. By September the whole thing will soften up. The freshly stained look is always a bit “much”. Give it some time.
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grumble wrote: Looks like uneven sanding and improper cleaning to me. Decks are notoriously tough to sand due to the boards not being perfectly flat - some of that unevenness doesn't show up until after you apply the stain, as it highlights the deck grain. You are correct that a new deck that was not previously stained does not typically require sanding - sanding is done to repair a damaged surface or to remove a previous, film-forming stain. It does require cleaning, as the deck is outside and will get dirty quickly - a clean surface is important for even and effective staining.
Agree, it was sanding marks showing in early posts. I think what OP is calling a belt sander is actually a large rotary sander; the type used on hardwood floors. Decks aren't as flat, the large sander floats on a few boards....unless operator really goes at it to flatten the deck boards that large sander will leave marks and likely gouge a few spots.
I wouldn't do it for a living but on my own deck a 5" random orbit sander does a good job.
Even new deck boards benefit from some time with random orbit sander, there are always some areas of raised grain/dirt/surface damage. The finish is nicer if boards dry out in sun and then random orbit sander used on it with say 120 grit then 220.
[OP]
Newbie
Feb 12, 2007
31 posts
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Mississauga
dottawat wrote: It looks good, don’t sweat it. By September the whole thing will soften up. The freshly stained look is always a bit “much”. Give it some time.
YES! It is blinding and looks so unnatural to me. But I do hope with the westfacing sun on it all summer, it will look a little less 'bright'. :) Thanks so much.
[OP]
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Feb 12, 2007
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Mississauga
Zamboni wrote: Agree, it was sanding marks showing in early posts. I think what OP is calling a belt sander is actually a large rotary sander; the type used on hardwood floors. Decks aren't as flat, the large sander floats on a few boards....unless operator really goes at it to flatten the deck boards that large sander will leave marks and likely gouge a few spots.
I wouldn't do it for a living but on my own deck a 5" random orbit sander does a good job.
Even new deck boards benefit from some time with random orbit sander, there are always some areas of raised grain/dirt/surface damage. The finish is nicer if boards dry out in sun and then random orbit sander used on it with say 120 grit then 220.
The sander was a square, not round but you're probably right. Too late now. It sure is showtime when you go out there! :facepalm: Thanks to everyone, I'm an expert now. :)
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Mar 22, 2017
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Zamboni wrote: Agree, it was sanding marks showing in early posts. I think what OP is calling a belt sander is actually a large rotary sander; the type used on hardwood floors. Decks aren't as flat, the large sander floats on a few boards....unless operator really goes at it to flatten the deck boards that large sander will leave marks and likely gouge a few spots.
I wouldn't do it for a living but on my own deck a 5" random orbit sander does a good job.
Even new deck boards benefit from some time with random orbit sander, there are always some areas of raised grain/dirt/surface damage. The finish is nicer if boards dry out in sun and then random orbit sander used on it with say 120 grit then 220.
I did my whole deck with a belt sander (50 grit), then a random orbital handheld sander (80 grit). It was a nightmare, took about 8hrs for 100sqft. The end result was a huge improvement though, without doing that I'd have had to replace the boards as they'd previously had a film forming stain.

I did read a bit about how going over 100 grit on a deck can close off the pores and reduce stain penetration. I did 80 grit and haven't found it to be rough or uneven - what was your experience like going to 220?
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grumble wrote: I did my whole deck with a belt sander (50 grit), then a random orbital handheld sander (80 grit). It was a nightmare, took about 8hrs for 100sqft. The end result was a huge improvement though, without doing that I'd have had to replace the boards as they'd previously had a film forming stain.

I did read a bit about how going over 100 grit on a deck can close off the pores and reduce stain penetration. I did 80 grit and haven't found it to be rough or uneven - what was your experience like going to 220?
You are right, I wasn't remembering correctly. We did 60 grit then 120....it was cedar hot tub sides I went to 220. Everything took the stain well, deck soaked the stain up quick. My then 16 year old son did a lot of the sanding, its a lot of time on your knees but results are worth it. Done this a few times, new deck boards just get hit with 120 grit. I didn't know about closing off pores, have had good results but something to consider....boards seem thirsty when I put the stain on.

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