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Help: Drain Question Please HELP

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  • Mar 28th, 2009 5:02 pm
[OP]
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Nov 28, 2003
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Help: Drain Question Please HELP

:confused:

[IMG]http://img516.imageshack.us/img516/8884/dsc00300.th.jpg[/IMG]

In my basement, I have a utility sink. Under the faucet there is this little pipe (above) that constantly feeds water down this drain (below)

[IMG]http://img516.imageshack.us/img516/4112/dsc00302.th.jpg[/IMG]

Can someone please tell me what this is doing? is it there for a purpose? :confused: :confused: :confused:
12 replies
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Sep 21, 2005
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This pipe is used to fill in the drain traps. There should always be water in the U-trap so that sewer gases do not come into your house. The builder installs this pipe so that when you use water from this utility sink, some water also gets into the trap.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trap_(plumbing)
[OP]
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Nov 28, 2003
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thanks led2,
the problem is the water is always flowing out even when i am not using the utility sink.. ... :(

i guess i will have to find a plumber to fix this.. no wonder my hrdro bill sky rocketed
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Dec 27, 2007
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This "primer" line is priming the "P-Trap" (not U-Trap). The faucet should only be allowing water to flow down the tubing when its turned on. If its constantly running try replacing the cartridges and or seats. If that doesn't work just swap out the faucet for another one. All of this can be done for under 40 bucks, calling a plumber will bring you in around the $200 range.
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While there should be water in the "P" trap to prevent the back up of sewer gas, the tubing in the photo looks to be going into the concrete floor.
OP, is the tubing just going into the floor or is that a black plastic pipe sticking up? It looks too small to be a normal drain installed by the builder. Where does that pipe come from on the faucet? Does it look like someone tapped the hose themselves or does it look like it came that way from the store?
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Pete_Coach wrote: While there should be water in the "P" trap to prevent the back up of sewer gas, the tubing in the photo looks to be going into the concrete floor.
OP, is the tubing just going into the floor or is that a black plastic pipe sticking up? It looks too small to be a normal drain installed by the builder. Where does that pipe come from on the faucet? Does it look like someone tapped the hose themselves or does it look like it came that way from the store?
Sleeving the primer line in another larger diameter pipe is commonly done. This is to prevent it from getting crushed, kinked, or damaged when gravel or concrete is being put in place. Also, some inspectors don't want the tubing touching concrete and require it to be sleeved. I do it all the time when installing primers running through a slab.
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jonnyb wrote: Sleeving the primer line in another larger diameter pipe is commonly done. This is to prevent it from getting crushed, kinked, or damaged when gravel or concrete is being put in place. Also, some inspectors don't want the tubing touching concrete and require it to be sleeved. I do it all the time when installing primers running through a slab.
Interesting. I presume you are a plumber? Are you saying that there is a "P" trap embedded underneath the concrete that requires water in it at all times? I would presume it would be for rough in of a toilet? My Son has a new house with a toilet rough in and he does not have any water dripping into it? When is this required and why? Can you explain "primers" in this context?
Also, I don't understand the mechanism of that faucet. I have replaced or installed several laundry room faucets and have never seen a connection for an small diameter hose on them. Is this something special or recent?
Sorry OP for hijacking this but I am curious and have an opportunity to learn something.
[OP]
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Nov 28, 2003
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jonnyb wrote: This "primer" line is priming the "P-Trap" (not U-Trap). The faucet should only be allowing water to flow down the tubing when its turned on. If its constantly running try replacing the cartridges and or seats. If that doesn't work just swap out the faucet for another one. All of this can be done for under 40 bucks, calling a plumber will bring you in around the $200 range.
jonnyb, what are cartridges or seats i never did any plumbing myself before ..
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Pete_Coach wrote: Interesting. I presume you are a plumber? Are you saying that there is a "P" trap embedded underneath the concrete that requires water in it at all times? I would presume it would be for rough in of a toilet? My Son has a new house with a toilet rough in and he does not have any water dripping into it? When is this required and why? Can you explain "primers" in this context?
Also, I don't understand the mechanism of that faucet. I have replaced or installed several laundry room faucets and have never seen a connection for an small diameter hose on them. Is this something special or recent?
Sorry OP for hijacking this but I am curious and have an opportunity to learn something.
Yes, I am a licensed plumber. According to code there must be a floor drain in the basement, and every floor drain must be primed to ensure it doesn't lose its trap seal (water in the p-trap). This can be done any number of ways but usually within houses through the laundry tub faucet is the most practical. The faucet has a small tapping off the bottom that simply allows water to flow through it when the actual faucet itself is turned on. This water then primes the trap and ensures there is water in it at all times. In regards to your sons house, a floor drain and toilet rough in are two different things. A toilet rough in doesn't need to be primed as there is no trap below the floor, the toilet itself has an internal p-trap. If its been roughed in just make sure to seal it off with some tape until your ready to actually install a toilet on it.
ayumon wrote: jonnyb, what are cartridges or seats i never did any plumbing myself before ..
On both the hot and cold handles you should be able to get a wrench and removed the cartridges. Ensure the water coming into the house is turned off though before doing so. If you take a crescent wrench you should be able to see where you would use it. As for the seats, there are located behind the cartridge and are what the cartridge closes on to make a positive seal. To remove these you'll need a seat removal tool which you can find at any hardware store. Try heading to Home Depot and asking for some advice, the people there will be able to show you what to do.
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jonnyb wrote: Yes, I am a licensed plumber. According to code there must be a floor drain in the basement, and every floor drain must be primed to ensure it doesn't lose its trap seal (water in the p-trap). This can be done any number of ways but usually within houses through the laundry tub faucet is the most practical. The faucet has a small tapping off the bottom that simply allows water to flow through it when the actual faucet itself is turned on. This water then primes the trap and ensures there is water in it at all times. In regards to your sons house, a floor drain and toilet rough in are two different things. A toilet rough in doesn't need to be primed as there is no trap below the floor, the toilet itself has an internal p-trap. If its been roughed in just make sure to seal it off with some tape until your ready to actually install a toilet on it.
Thanks for the info. I have a floor drain in my house and had it "scoped" a couple years ago because my basement flooded with storm water. I still have the video tape. Anyway, there was no "P" trap, it was a drain pipe that went straight out to the storm system. I do have a laundry tub and the water from there goes down a different set of pipes. To the sanitary system I believe. I don't dispute what you are saying because I am not a plumber but, like I said, one goes into the sanitary system (waste water, bathtubs, sinks, etc) and the other is a drain for overflow and goes out to the storm system. In my community, they never mix the two.
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It's odd to hear that your drain is connected to the storm and not the sanitary when having a "seperate" drainage system. Believe it or not the storm side of things can produce quite a nasty smell so I'm suprised to hear what you have stated. The only thing I can possibly think of is that you had the storm scoped through what should be a cleanout, not a drain. How old is the house?
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jonnyb wrote: It's odd to hear that your drain is connected to the storm and not the sanitary when having a "seperate" drainage system. Believe it or not the storm side of things can produce quite a nasty smell so I'm suprised to hear what you have stated. The only thing I can possibly think of is that you had the storm scoped through what should be a cleanout, not a drain. How old is the house?
Nope, I know that for sure. The house was built in the 70's. The floor drain in my house went all the way out to the street storm water drainage. They even tracked it with a little radio beacon that was in the camera. The laundry tub drain went into a different drain (with a cleanout) that was connected to the sinks upstairs.
Anyway, I really do think that there are different systems throughout the Province and even throughout a region and that they have changed over the years but they cannot upgrade or update the old systems because of the costs involved. Thanks for your insight.

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