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Help identify invasive plant in backyard

  • Last Updated:
  • May 7th, 2020 3:40 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 22, 2014
3335 posts
1334 upvotes
Toronto

Help identify invasive plant in backyard

There is small batch of thorny plant that has been growing at the corner of my yard for a few years. I would trim it yearly but never killed it - letting it be since it's not spreading.

Today I noticed similar plants sprouting up (3 or 4) nearby in other parts of my yard. I dug a little to uproot it and.... to my dismay I discovered a network of roots from the plant in the corner.

The roots are about 1-2 foot buried, sized about coaxial cable in diameter, and has a bright yellow coat. They run quite far (I dug out 10 meters on one).

Here are some pictures:

https://ibb.co/z5NtXn5
https://ibb.co/9rN7hCY
https://ibb.co/VqjdZvT

Does anyone know what this thorny plant is? And how can I remove it, root and all?

Is digging out all the roots an option? I think a network of these roots permeate my entire backyard.
8 replies
Member
Mar 13, 2012
337 posts
93 upvotes
Sarnia
Hard to tell without the leaves, but looks like bramble or wild blackberry. New growth can sprout from lateral roots buried as deep as 45 cm. according to this site. Digging out the root ball completely seems to be the best non-chemical control.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
35233 posts
21216 upvotes
Center of Universe
Your backyard is a disaster.lol
Sr. Member
Aug 29, 2019
720 posts
302 upvotes
Those are native shrubs and important food for songbirds like robins and cardinals. I always leave mine. They commonly grow along fences where the lawnmower misses them. The canes die every two years and new ones sprout from the root. Those 3-4 new shoots that you are talking about are replacements for the old stems dying out and they're not actually spreading. You're supposed to cut the old yellowed straw colored canes and leave the new darker growth every couple years and they wont be messy.
Deal Addict
Oct 13, 2014
2148 posts
1384 upvotes
Just Moved To Somewh…
As said before it is hard to tell without foliage. They look the same as the shoots from my Gogi Berry bush.
“Before one can have a Clue they must first accumulate 10 Inklings. That said, all it takes is one bad post and you erase all Inklings & Clues accumulated'"
Sr. Member
Aug 29, 2019
720 posts
302 upvotes
OttawaGardener wrote: Not raspberry. The thorns are different https://www.friendsofthewildflowergarde ... tem300.jpg Could be blackberry.

It is possibly suckers from a neighbour's tree - locust trees have thorns and are notorious for suckering some distance away.
If it is a black locust, may I have a sucker @Elfwood ?Grinning Face With Smiling Eyes
Been trying to find a seedling on my nature walks but have had no luck. Lucky you.
Deal Addict
Aug 30, 2011
3459 posts
1219 upvotes
Ottawa
Katedontbreak wrote: If it is a black locust, may I have a sucker @Elfwood ?Grinning Face With Smiling Eyes
Been trying to find a seedling on my nature walks but have had no luck. Lucky you.
If you're in suburbia and plant one, all your neighbours will hate you. They have nasty thorns, and spread far from the mother tree.
Sr. Member
Aug 29, 2019
720 posts
302 upvotes
OttawaGardener wrote: If you're in suburbia and plant one, all your neighbours will hate you. They have nasty thorns, and spread far from the mother tree.
All my neighbours have Silver Maples, Norway Maples, Box Elder, Poplar, half dead douglas fir, spider mite infested bare needle spruce, 90% needleless Scotch pines, completely dead Ash trees and all matter of free trees that germinated out of bird poo butted up against my fence. I doubt they would know or care. Black locust is a beautiful tree. I would much rather those than the trees they have which are all dead, half dead or mite and disease infested.Winking Face

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