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Help with lot line survey

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  • May 1st, 2020 11:58 pm
[OP]
Member
Feb 21, 2017
266 posts
154 upvotes

Help with lot line survey

Wondering if anyone can help me,
Last edited by asys71 on Jan 2nd, 2021 8:23 pm, edited 2 times in total.
9 replies
Sr. Member
Jun 26, 2019
775 posts
575 upvotes
asys71 wrote: 1. Is the board fence on the lot line or on my lot?
Only way to know 100% is either to locate the iron bars or hire a surveyor. If you look at the survey, they surveyed the board fence that was there at the time, idk if its the same board fence, but if it is then it looks like its on the property line, the board fence that existed at the time of the survey is denoted by the ------X------X---------- line.

Seeing as you have some dimensions from the back of your house, could measure that and see if the numbers check out.
asys71 wrote: 2. Why is there a 15 foot distance between SIB and IB? (Should i dig to find the SIB and IB?)
You property line isn't linear at that back side. It bends at the SIB, so thats why you have two iron bars there to show the corners.
asys71 wrote: 4. Also there is a hydro pole lookalike in corner too. There was never hydro going that way, anyone know its purpose?
Your guess is as good as mine, its on City property so I'd probably call the municipality if you have questions. Don't see any evidence of a hydro easement on the survey.
[OP]
Member
Feb 21, 2017
266 posts
154 upvotes
SubjectivelyObjective wrote: Only way to know 100% is either to locate the iron bars or hire a surveyor. If you look at the survey, they surveyed the board fence that was there at the time, idk if its the same board fence, but if it is then it looks like its on the property line, the board fence that existed at the time of the survey is denoted by the ------X------X---------- line.

Seeing as you have some dimensions from the back of your house, could measure that and see if the numbers check out.



You property line isn't linear at that back side. It bends at the SIB, so thats why you have two iron bars there to show the corners.



Your guess is as good as mine, its on City property so I'd probably call the municipality if you have questions. Don't see any evidence of a hydro easement on the survey.
Thank you very much for your help. Do you know what the 1 foot measurement is beside the IB lettering on both top left and top right edge of property?

Is it safe for me to start digging to look for the IB and SIB? I dont see them on the surface, unless they were removed at some point.

Thanks again.
Sr. Member
Jun 26, 2019
775 posts
575 upvotes
asys71 wrote: Thank you very much for your help. Do you know what the 1 foot measurement is beside the IB lettering on both top left and top right edge of property?
Not all that sure, my best guess would be that they are a dimension between the property line and the fence, but not all that confident.
asys71 wrote: Is it safe for me to start digging to look for the IB and SIB? I dont see them on the surface, unless they were removed at some point.
Generally speaking, you should always call before you dig, sometimes you just never know. Also, if you're going to be putting in fence posts, you're gonna need someone to complete locates, so you could just call OneCall or whatever is in your area to get locates done.

Iron bars are usually always left there, and they are usually always buried. Hopefully it should be somewhat easy to find in this situation if you look for them, but metal detectors always help. In lieu of finding them, you could probably just start at the existing fence corner post and line it up with an offset from the corner of your house. This might put you marginally over your property line at the corner, a bit in where the bend is, and then equal by the corner of the house, assuming that current fence was the one captured in the survey.
[OP]
Member
Feb 21, 2017
266 posts
154 upvotes
SubjectivelyObjective wrote: Not all that sure, my best guess would be that they are a dimension between the property line and the fence, but not all that confident.



Generally speaking, you should always call before you dig, sometimes you just never know. Also, if you're going to be putting in fence posts, you're gonna need someone to complete locates, so you could just call OneCall or whatever is in your area to get locates done.

Iron bars are usually always left there, and they are usually always buried. Hopefully it should be somewhat easy to find in this situation if you look for them, but metal detectors always help. In lieu of finding them, you could probably just start at the existing fence corner post and line it up with an offset from the corner of your house. This might put you marginally over your property line at the corner, a bit in where the bend is, and then equal by the corner of the house, assuming that current fence was the one captured in the survey.
Once again thank you and have a good day.
Member
Nov 13, 2007
294 posts
63 upvotes
Toronto
I am not sure what you think is 1 foot is actually 1 foot. It looks more like O:I to me not 1.0' . A surveyor will have to weigh in
Sr. Member
Jun 26, 2019
775 posts
575 upvotes
clax66 wrote: I am not sure what you think is 1 foot is actually 1 foot. It looks more like O:I to me not 1.0' . A surveyor will have to weigh in
Based on the rest of the survey, I think its 0.1 feet. The ' for feet combined with the decimal makes it look like a :
Member
Nov 13, 2007
294 posts
63 upvotes
Toronto
SubjectivelyObjective wrote: Based on the rest of the survey, I think its 0.1 feet. The ' for feet combined with the decimal makes it look like a :
I re-looked at survey and you are right, 0.1 feet is right
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2018
4324 posts
4376 upvotes
Vancouver
Often a fence is built just on one side of the property line, depending on when it was built and what the agreement was (if any) between the property owners at the time. So don't rely on the fence line.

When a developer razed the house next door to us to build a new monster home, their first step was a property line survey, marked by a peg line. Then they built a new fence just on their side of the line. I was fortunately able to verify their property line location because I had a lot diagram showing the foundation of my house with some accuracy, including a little inset next to the chimney. From there I was able to measure the distance to the property line accurately, and their survey was correct.
Sr. Member
Oct 22, 2016
630 posts
537 upvotes
Comox Valley
I suggest for your piece of mind is find the survey pins. I had the same problem last year and I69Norm suggested “There’s a special metal detector called a schonstedt that can be rented to find survey pins. Magnatrack is another detector for survey pins”.

I did this last fall, spent 6 hours with no luck (30 year old lot). And then I rented a metal pin finder, like on the bottom of this page

https://sharecost.ca/surveying-tools.html

For Rent: Metal Pin Finder
Primarily used to find property pins.
Metal Pin Finder
This unit locates buried objects with ferromagnetic properties, such as surveyors’ stakes, rebar, and cast iron or steel pipes. This metal detector will not work on most precious metals.

Found it after 45 minutes. Well worth the cost.

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