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Help understand how to mount swing hardware

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Help understand how to mount swing hardware

Hey all, I’m struggling a bit on how to mount this swing hardware to the ceiling. I’ve attached a pic of my room before drywall went up by the builder. Are the horizontal wood pieces structural? Are these referred to as beams and thus I can install there to handle 200lbs of weight?

Searched a lot online and couldn’t gather an easy way to install this. Of course my stud finder can only detect the horizontal bars. Even if I found the intersection of both horizontal and vertical wood bars, my mounting kit is too big. Thoughts?

https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B078GLX91J/
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The beams on edge are structural and that's what's you'd want to attach them to. A bolt theory the side of the beam would be ideal, but a long threaded hook should also be strong enough. My concern would be that 200lbs would flex the ceiling enough to crack your drywall. Preventing that would require additional reinforcement in the attic.
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We have a few hanging chairs at the house and at the cottage.

All of them are hung on a single large screw-eye put into a ceiling joist. Probably 3/8" or so screw-eye.

The joists at the house are 100 year old 2x8. The cottage ceiling is made up of scissor trusses constructed of 2x4 lumber. Another hangs in a bunkie I made from a 2x4 spanning 9 feet mounted in joist hangers.

I have sat in these chairs and weigh around 180 pounds. The screw-eyes are perpendicular to the floor - straight up into the ceiling joist. Never had a moment of worry about any of them holding my weight.

What is the span of those ceiling joists? Not the 1x3 strapping that is there for drywall I assume to get 16" on-center screw points (the joists look like 24" OC) - that strapping is there to hold up drywall and nothing else. You drill right through that into the joist and mount your hanger into the joist.
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TomLafinsky wrote: The 1X3 @ 16" are to install drywall and 'stabilize' the 2X6. You need to find and screw into the 2X6 (first through the 1X3). This looks to me like a Richcraft house.
Are they for sure 2x6? They look like 2x4, but maybe it's just the photo.
Still it looks like a long span.
Now imagine I'm in the chair and my kid's jump on me, so now it's at 300lbs, or if a large uncle decides to sit in it.
I think the constant flexing, especially with the swinging could crack the drywall joints.
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engineered wrote: Are they for sure 2x6? They look like 2x4, but maybe it's just the photo.
Still it looks like a long span.
Now imagine I'm in the chair and my kid's jump on me, so now it's at 300lbs, or if a large uncle decides to sit in it.
I think the constant flexing, especially with the swinging could crack the drywall joints.
Yeah, I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but this looks like a Truss system, so your thinking of 2x4s could be correct.

Most engineered truss systems in applications like this are only designed for the dead load of the ceiling. So a point load randomly on the truss somewhere is probably not designed for.

So that's my sad realistic point of view.

In other news, people put up garage storage on trusses all the time and that weighs a lot. So the factor of safety applied to it offers you some protection, this said, they are for sure exceeding design loads and its not recommended.

The horizontal pieces are not structural, and with kids jumping on the swing, your drywall probably wont last long.
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hey guys, thanks for responding, can someone also help me with terminology to avoid confusion. The long pieces going up and down are the joists? and the other is what? beams? If so, the joist is typically 2x6 right so my mounting hardware is just under 2 inches and even if I magically find the right spot, isn't that cutting it close? From what I gather in this thread, I should NOT mount it to the beam since it's weak. I've seen some people drill a 2x4 across 2 joists on the ceiling, then mount the hardware to that. I guess I could do that but what do you guys think? Can I get away with what I have now? Also, how could I even find that magic spot where the joist and beam meet?
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jeeva86 wrote: hey guys, thanks for responding, can someone also help me with terminology to avoid confusion. The long pieces going up and down are the joists? and the other is what? beams? If so, the joist is typically 2x6 right so my mounting hardware is just under 2 inches and even if I magically find the right spot, isn't that cutting it close? From what I gather in this thread, I should NOT mount it to the beam since it's weak. I've seen some people drill a 2x4 across 2 joists on the ceiling, then mount the hardware to that. I guess I could do that but what do you guys think? Can I get away with what I have now? Also, how could I even find that magic spot where the joist and beam meet?
Let's try to explain this simply:

A Joist is the structural members which span across either a floor or ceiling. They are arranged vertically or with the longer side vertical as this provides the most resistance to moments developed in your structure. In a "standard" floor, you're probably looking at 2x8s, but all these vary a lot depending on span, spacing, etc.

The first thing I wanted to point out was the fact that you do not have joists here. You have an engineered truss system. What this means, is while a joist system can usually support the dead load AND the live loads of the floor above and below it, in this case you have an engineered truss system. *Depending* on how this is designed, it could really just be engineered to support the dead load i.e the weight of the structure and the drywall, and not the live load (you kids jumping up and down on a swing, or people living and walking on the floor above). I know people will say "Buttttttttt I walk in my attic all the time and its fine", sure, your weight, plus the dead load distributed across a few points wont cause any deflection seeing as you're just there for a bit. However, repeated use of a swing on a very small point on the truss system that isn't designed for it *could* cause issues.

If you want to put in some extra members and distribute the load a bit more and you are comfortable with that, be my guest. As I've said before, people have put 600lb shelves that anchor on 4 points onto garage trusses before and it seems to hold. Yay factors of safety and/or luck!

The smaller members are designed just to hold drywall. They are also installed on the weak side for bending. So that's a no go.

I think your best bet for locating a joist may be to do it from the attic side if that is possible.

Also, just as an FYI, a 2x piece of lumber is not 2 inches across. You probably only have about a good 1.5" to hit. This said, it probably doesnt matter how big your mounting hardware is, but its the size of the screws. Don't know how big the screws are, but based on just a random guess, you probably have a good margin of error of at least a half inch of being off center and still getting a good anchor in.

Hope that helps!
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SubjectivelyObjective wrote: Let's try to explain this simply:

A Joist is the structural members which span across either a floor or ceiling. They are arranged vertically or with the longer side vertical as this provides the most resistance to moments developed in your structure. In a "standard" floor, you're probably looking at 2x8s, but all these vary a lot depending on span, spacing, etc.

The first thing I wanted to point out was the fact that you do not have joists here. You have an engineered truss system. What this means, is while a joist system can usually support the dead load AND the live loads of the floor above and below it, in this case you have an engineered truss system. *Depending* on how this is designed, it could really just be engineered to support the dead load i.e the weight of the structure and the drywall, and not the live load (you kids jumping up and down on a swing, or people living and walking on the floor above). I know people will say "Buttttttttt I walk in my attic all the time and its fine", sure, your weight, plus the dead load distributed across a few points wont cause any deflection seeing as you're just there for a bit. However, repeated use of a swing on a very small point on the truss system that isn't designed for it *could* cause issues.

If you want to put in some extra members and distribute the load a bit more and you are comfortable with that, be my guest. As I've said before, people have put 600lb shelves that anchor on 4 points onto garage trusses before and it seems to hold. Yay factors of safety and/or luck!

The smaller members are designed just to hold drywall. They are also installed on the weak side for bending. So that's a no go.

I think your best bet for locating a joist may be to do it from the attic side if that is possible.

Also, just as an FYI, a 2x piece of lumber is not 2 inches across. You probably only have about a good 1.5" to hit. This said, it probably doesnt matter how big your mounting hardware is, but its the size of the screws. Don't know how big the screws are, but based on just a random guess, you probably have a good margin of error of at least a half inch of being off center and still getting a good anchor in.

Hope that helps!
Thanks! So do I have any wooden beams? I’m gonna avoid the attic Face With Medical Mask. I think you’re referring to using the eye hook. Attached image of the kit that I have. It’s about 1.5” between the screws so hence it’s hard to hit the spot. That’s why I was wondering if I get a member Across and drill it into two trusses, through the drywall, then that gives me more space for my mounting kit.

On the other hand, what would Be the ideal way to mount this if you’re Saying the truss isn’t designed for live load? Do I just have to go to the park to get my swing game on?!
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jeeva86 wrote: Thanks! So do I have any wooden beams? I’m gonna avoid the attic Face With Medical Mask. I think you’re referring to using the eye hook. Attached image of the kit that I have. It’s about 1.5” between the screws so hence it’s hard to hit the spot. That’s why I was wondering if I get a member Across and drill it into two trusses, through the drywall, then that gives me more space for my mounting kit.

On the other hand, what would Be the ideal way to mount this if you’re Saying the truss isn’t designed for live load? Do I just have to go to the park to get my swing game on?!
Is it a sex swing? The most secure place would be to mount to a door jamb.
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TomLafinsky wrote: Attaching a 200 lbs dead weight to a single 2X4 is fine. A swing set is a totally different story. The Truss system as explained by another poster is calculated by engineers and designed to support the weight of the roof. It is not designed for a swing set.

If you really want to do this you would need to go to the attic and use something like a 2X6 to spread the weight over a few 2X4. You will disturb the fluffy insulation. You need a long hook as you have 1/2" drywall + 1" (1X3) + 3 1/2" (2X4) and then you screw into the 2X6.

Btw you have 2X4. This is what happens when I reply to posts before my first coffee (and thanks to covid-19 for getting me to bed around 2am). If one looks carefully at your pic one can compare the wood making up the wall with the wood of the Truss System. The wall is undeniably 2X6 (the builder doesn't have a choice). AFAIK, for residential housing it is always 2X4. Note to self, always make sure the brain is in gear before the mouth is engaged.
Thanks! Can I spread the load by using a 2x4 from the inside of my room? Basically, what are my options if I want to avoid the attic? Also with your idea, I’d have to get a maaaassssive eye hook screw. I feel like an idiot buying this without catching the difficulty of mounting it. Didn’t expect it to be this difficult!

I still think it’s 2x6 based on my other pics. Curious minds look here - https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/ ... WyN-9rGnib

Btw the swing is https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B010GA2X1M

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