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Alaskan 20kg Premium Ice Melter Bag or Scotts EZMELT Ice Melter 20kg $13.48 (with Price Match)

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 21st, 2022 12:42 am
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Dec 20, 2004
3358 posts
3414 upvotes
Montreal, QC
jumperson22 wrote: New to the salt game and was wondering what the difference is between this and the big yellow bags which are about $7.98 for the 20KG bag (I just bought a couple of bags last week). Is there a big material difference that I'm missing?
Like others mentioned, the yellow backs are straight up rock salt. Rock salt is not as effective in extremely low temperatures, and hence not too good on concrete since it will get into any cracks or absorbed and then when it refreezes it can crack concrete even more. Ice melter is typically calcium chloride or potassium chloride, and the freezing point is lower so it can avoid refreezing a lot longer, so the water has more time to evaporate and not refreeze on the surface or in any cracks, making it worse.

I usually get some of both.
Rock salt, I usually get these from Rona
Marco Ice Salt - 20 kg @ $4.99)
Marco Ice Salt - 40 kg @ $8.69)

And for ICE melter I typically get what's on sale:
Alaskan Premium Ice Melter - 20kg - on sale now for $14.98
People can try to PM HD, but sometimes my HD will only PM (but not beat by 10%) if the item is on sale at competitor.
Scotts EZMelt - 20kg also on sale for $14.98 right now.
Sifto Safe Step Xtreme Ice Melter (20kg) some stores have it down to $5.98 (but not much stock left) - this one however is decent at melting, but I found you need a little more than others, since it is more in the form of "heavy flakes", instead of similar texture as rock salt.
All of the above were pretty good (for my use at least). All pretty effective.

This year (even though I had plenty from other years) I decided to buy a few of these since they were on clearance.
Marco Ice Melter - Yukon - 20 kg @ $5.50 on clearance.
This one was just "OK". I found it is does not act as quickly as the others, but it does the job. Then again, this year when I used it the temperatures were REALLY low (>23C) so that could have affected it's efficiency. Also found it was a little courser (bigger pieces) than all the others.


I am pretty liberal with the use of my salt and ice melters. I go through about 100kg a year (has been years I've gone through more than that). So far this year I have gone through nearly 40kg. Don't want anyone in the family slipping, and I have 1 tenant also, and don't need the hassle. I use the ice melters primarily on my concrete entrance balconies, stairs, and landing pad. And I use the straight up rock salt on my asphalt driveways and city sidewalks in front of my property.

Outside in the front of mine and my tenants doors, I have some large hole rubber mats (similar to these but larger holes), to help in avoiding to drag in any salt or gravel from the outside. They do help quite a bit, and very simple to lift and get rid of any accumulation as needed.
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Jul 14, 2008
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694 upvotes
WilliamT1451 wrote: Good Deal! However, I just bought 2 bags this past weekend at 16$/ 20kg @ HD.

Here is a chart(Source: Greater Sudbury Watershed Alliance) that I used to decide what Ice melter to buy based on its environmental impact. I was going to buy the Alaskan pet-friendly one but I find that it won't work very well in very cold temperatures and also it is quite pricy.

Decision-Aid-to-Ice-Melts-and-Traction-Aids
Thanks for the link- very helpful explanation on various different ice-melt. We've been using the Snow Joe "enviro-blend" melt, which claimed to the use of CMA being "an environmentally benign deicing agent". but still showed up as "harmful" based on the chart..going to switch over to Alaskan pet-friendly ones
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Mar 22, 2017
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West GTA
Honestly I used to use a moderate amount of ice melter but have since scaled it way back. First, it's not good for the overall environment - I wish cities would also use materially less salt. Second, it's not good for the local environment - the salt gets into nearby soil and in the air and kills plants. I like having nice landscaping. Third, it's hard on the surfaces it's applied on - it can cause damage to any porous surface through freeze/thaw, and the salts can directly attack some hard surface chemistries. Fourth, it tends to be hard on animals.

I keep a bag of Alaskan Ice to address hard-frozen ice, but other than that I just shovel away promptly. Works pretty well.
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Feb 1, 2009
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Ajax
mighty_chef wrote: Bought Scott’s EZ Melt in November for the same price.

I absolutely hate it compared to Alaskan

I feel like the size of Scott’s salt is larger, doesn’t spread evenly and doesn’t melt ice/snow as much as Alaskan, which is finer and covers a bigger area.

It’s hard to explain LOL

982E9D05-8A8D-4AC7-ABC1-14FB7A168DB4.jpeg
I've used both and Alaskan is way messier because of all the filler they add (rocks and sand).

ez melt has worked extremely well for me.
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Dec 20, 2004
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Montreal, QC
OongaLoonga wrote: Sifto ice salt isn't available near me.
I've seen some other posters have said they use Water softener salt. What are your thoughts on this for -25C weather/ice?
https://www.homedepot.ca/product/sifto-crystal-plus-20kg-water-softener-salt/1000176320
Probably not very effective at those temperatures, since it is just plain old Sodium Chloride. So it is the same as regular rock salt, but I believe it is slightly smaller granules.

If you are just looking for plain rock salt, there is obviously more brands out there than Sifto. There is Windsor, Marco, and many other brands that are specific to each area. But obviously regular rock salt is not very effective once temperatures drop below -7C or so...

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