Expired Hot Deals

[Home Depot] Bernzomatic 14.1 oz. Map-Pro Cylinder 2pk $8.98 Hot? YMMV?

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  • Apr 9th, 2019 8:37 am
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Apr 17, 2005
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Its been this pricing for a LONG time, since last time's Bernzomatic Torch head sale at Lowes

I bought it back in November for my Not-A-Flamethrower

Most of the stock in the GTA is phantom.
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Sep 2, 2007
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Wizard1 wrote: Its been this pricing for a LONG time, since last time's Bernzomatic Torch head sale at Lowes

I bought it back in November for my Not-A-Flamethrower

Most of the stock in the GTA is phantom.
Hmm... Are you referring to the $14.98 price? Because I didn't see any mention of it at $9.98 yet.
I felt bad for missing out on a few spare tanks back than when I bought the torch but than I ran into this deal and I suddenly didn't feel so bad...

Also just wondering any idea how long do these tanks normally last with average usage? For me probably a couple times a week with cooking.
I may have bought more tanks than I probably need at this price lol. Oh well.
Last edited by RedruM7 on Apr 5th, 2019 3:22 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Richfields wrote: If you're tasting the torch then you're too close to the meat/product. Pull back further and that shouldn't be an issue. I had the same problem early on until trial and error made me realize I was too close.
I tried MAP Pro, propane and butane, and found butane tasted the best, but took longer as it was the smallest and coldest flame. Maybe the flames were too close, or not burning cleanly, but now when I sous vide I just toss the meat on a super hot grill for a few seconds as the torches take way too long.
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Jul 6, 2018
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engineered wrote: I tried MAP Pro, propane and butane, and found butane tasted the best, but took longer as it was the smallest and coldest flame. Maybe the flames were too close, or not burning cleanly, but now when I sous vide I just toss the meat on a super hot grill for a few seconds as the torches take way too long.
Taken from a sous vide website...

What you do want to do, however, is to adjust the flame on your kitchen torch until it turns dark blue. The blue color means that it’s an oxidizing flame, not a reducing flame. This is a chemistry difference that matters for your food. If the flame is yellow, it’s a reducing flame, and there will be hydrocarbons from the fuel — whether it’s propane or butane — that aren’t fully combusted. These can end up in your food, creating an “off” taste in whatever you’ve seared with the torch.
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Mar 22, 2018
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I would suggest just refilling your empty cylinders with a 20lb tank and an adapter such as this . If you already have good cylinders
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Sep 2, 2007
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Some good searing tips here thanks guys. Looks like it'll be steaks on a friday night...
Main thing I love about using a torch that I don't hear people talking about is that its much less mess, I find searing steaks in the cast iron is a mess not unlike cooking bacon.

I was definitely also wondering if I needed map fuel and if I should just do refills as well, but I took the easy way out when I saw this deal. 4 extra tanks will last me quite a while I'm thinking...

On another side note, has anyone here tried the heat gun method in place of a torch, apparently it has the effect of a searzall, no gas and no possibility of torch taste, with the downside of speed.
I was looking for something electric like this ("electric torch" lol) and totally forgot heat guns existed....

Sous Vide Everything actually recommends it over searzall in the below vid.


https://thetastingbuds.com/2018/08/cook ... r-hot-air/
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Arossi22 wrote:
Taken from a sous vide website...

What you do want to do, however, is to adjust the flame on your kitchen torch until it turns dark blue. The blue color means that it’s an oxidizing flame, not a reducing flame. This is a chemistry difference that matters for your food. If the flame is yellow, it’s a reducing flame, and there will be hydrocarbons from the fuel — whether it’s propane or butane — that aren’t fully combusted. These can end up in your food, creating an “off” taste in whatever you’ve seared with the torch.
Yes, the bluer the better, which may explain why my butane was best because I recall it being the bluest. I'll have to see if I can adjust my propane torch to get bluer/hotter.
RedruM7 wrote: Some good searing tips here thanks guys. Looks like it'll be steaks on a friday night...
Main thing I love about using a torch that I don't hear people talking about is that its much less mess, I find searing steaks in the cast iron is a mess not unlike cooking bacon.

I was definitely also wondering if I needed map fuel and if I should just do refills as well, but I took the easy way out when I saw this deal. 4 extra tanks will last me quite a while I'm thinking...

On another side note, has anyone here tried the heat gun method in place of a torch, apparently it has the effect of a searzall, no gas and no possibility of torch taste, with the downside of speed.
I was looking for something electric like this ("electric torch" lol) and totally forgot heat guns existed....

Sous Vide Everything actually recommends it over searzall in the below vid.


https://thetastingbuds.com/2018/08/cook ... r-hot-air/
Damn, never thought about a heat gun. I need to see how hot mine gets.
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RedruM7 wrote: Some good searing tips here thanks guys. Looks like it'll be steaks on a friday night...
Main thing I love about using a torch that I don't hear people talking about is that its much less mess, I find searing steaks in the cast iron is a mess not unlike cooking bacon.

I was definitely also wondering if I needed map fuel and if I should just do refills as well, but I took the easy way out when I saw this deal. 4 extra tanks will last me quite a while I'm thinking...

On another side note, has anyone here tried the heat gun method in place of a torch, apparently it has the effect of a searzall, no gas and no possibility of torch taste, with the downside of speed.
I was looking for something electric like this ("electric torch" lol) and totally forgot heat guns existed....

Sous Vide Everything actually recommends it over searzall in the below vid.


https://thetastingbuds.com/2018/08/cook ... r-hot-air/
That's not the conclusion they gave. The heatgun is better for "this application" (meaning heating chicken w/ skin) since it was able to make the entire chicken skin crispy. That's primarily because it takes the heatgun more time to heat up the skin, so the heat had more time to penetrate deeper into the skin.

On the other hand, the longer heating time is a huge negative if you're heating up something like a steak, since the lower the temp (and consequently the longer you heat it for), the more heat penetrates the outer surface, and causes more of the steak to be overcooked (a.k.a. a thicker "grey band"). In fact, the entire point of the torch was to minimize heating time so the steak would have minimal grey banding.

Personally, if I wanted to make chicken skin crispy, I would just sous vide the chicken, take it out, use a paper towel to dry the chicken skin, and then pan fry the skin on high. It would do the same thing as the heatgun, without having to buy a heatgun that takes up more space.
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keyser-soze wrote: To add, the searzall (if you are going to use one) actually says to only use wider camping propane cylinders to prevent toppling over as well as MAPP being too hot for the tool.
Just thought I'd mention, the cylinders here are not MAPP gas they're MAP-PRO, and it burns at a lower temp than MAP and just slightly higher than propane.
"MAP-Pro Vs. Propane. MAP-Pro gas burns at a temperature of 3,730 degrees Fahrenheit, while propane burns at 3,600 F. Because it heats copper faster and to a higher temperature, MAP-Pro gas is a superior alternative to propane for soldering."
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Mar 4, 2006
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keyser-soze wrote: I have the searzall and really like it (it is a bit slow thought) when I cant get outside to sear.

If I can get outside then I will more often then not use the weed/asphalt/ice torch like - https://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/ ... -p8696338e

I have two one is 100,000 btu and another is 500,000 both work well, just need to be careful, takes a bit of practice. Lots of vids of sousvide people using these with great results. Souvsvide everything is a great channel on youtube and they did a showdown on best searing tool - flamethrower, ie what I linked about won.
It took me this far in the thread to realize that you guys weren’t using this for soldering! I thought that tasting the torch was some secret plumber slang about cooking off the flux or something. I’ll go back under my rock now.
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mattisgrat wrote: It took me this far in the thread to realize that you guys weren’t using this for soldering! I thought that tasting the torch was some secret plumber slang about cooking off the flux or something. I’ll go back under my rock now.
Lol !!! Priceless !!
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mattisgrat wrote: It took me this far in the thread to realize that you guys weren’t using this for soldering! I thought that tasting the torch was some secret plumber slang about cooking off the flux or something. I’ll go back under my rock now.
It's sort of funny how Bernzomatic reviews are increasingly getting dominated by people who are using them to cook, rather than the intended purpose.
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Sep 1, 2017
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keyser-soze wrote: To add, the searzall (if you are going to use one) actually says to only use wider camping propane cylinders to prevent toppling over as well as MAPP being too hot for the tool.
I'd recommend that people use the TS8000 without the (IMO) overhyped and inefficient Searzall attachment.
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mattisgrat wrote: It took me this far in the thread to realize that you guys weren’t using this for soldering! I thought that tasting the torch was some secret plumber slang about cooking off the flux or something. I’ll go back under my rock now.
You can solder with these? ;)

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