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[Home Depot] Milwaukee Tool M18 18V Hammer Drill/Impact Driver Combo Kit (2-Tool & 1.5Ah Bat), Charger, Tool Bag for $198 w/FS

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  • Feb 21st, 2020 9:46 pm
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2018
2511 posts
2482 upvotes
Vancouver
wongster wrote: Just to add 1.5 batteries are not strong enough to drill a 7/8” drill bit hole in a 2x4 wood from my tests. Even with a fuel gen 2 hammer drill. 3.0 battery went through np.
There should be no difference in drill power with the different battery capacities unless the battery is low on charge, or it's old or defective and it's dying. The capacity is more about how long the tool will run, although it's true that for high-drain tools like saws a too-small battery will start to sag in power delivery much faster than a proper-capacity battery. But while a 7/8" hole is big, I doubt it takes anything like 15 minutes of continuous drilling to go through a 2x4. Check your 1.5ah battery - it may be due for replacement.
Member
User avatar
Mar 25, 2015
360 posts
132 upvotes
where fire and disco…
wolfsburg04 wrote: I'm in the market for one !!

no brushless motor

1.5 AH battery

I'm waiting for feedback
i would get this ridgid set-up
comes with 2-2ah batts and a free 2ah batt to boot, so twice the longevity of the 3ah total of the milwuakee

register the combo kit and get free lifetime warranty on the drill, driver and the 2 batteries (the third battery will have a 3 year warranty)

i've had this kit for years and picked up the milwuakee fuel brushless 18v drill a couple years after
they have been used about the same amount of time/situations, some full house builds and lots of major reno work, and the ridgid are in far better working order
(the milwuakee slips at high torque situations and cannot finish, plus the chuck does not always stay tight)

unfortunately the milwuakee is out of its warranty period so i can't fix and the 4ah batteries are about 65% and 45% now (whereas about a year ago i got a free set from ridgid)
even my one-handed milwuakee sawzall is in the shop for the third time,
so in the meantime i picked up the new brushless ridgid and it is heavier but works like a champ so far

i will be switching to ridgid for all my cordless tools now, and dewalt for my corded tools
I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.
Thomas Jefferson
Jr. Member
Feb 12, 2017
119 posts
81 upvotes
Scote64 wrote: There should be no difference in drill power with the different battery capacities unless the battery is low on charge, or it's old or defective and it's dying. The capacity is more about how long the tool will run, although it's true that for high-drain tools like saws a too-small battery will start to sag in power delivery much faster than a proper-capacity battery. But while a 7/8" hole is big, I doubt it takes anything like 15 minutes of continuous drilling to go through a 2x4. Check your 1.5ah battery - it may be due for replacement.

wrong!

larger Ah rating DOES give you more power and torque.


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Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2018
2511 posts
2482 upvotes
Vancouver
althegreat wrote: larger Ah rating DOES give you more power and torque.
No, the amp-hour rating has nothing to do with power and torque. It's only run time.

There is a separate spec for the larger batteries to do with maximum current output. Larger batteries made for more power-hungry tools like saws can output a higher maximum current, allowing the tool to develop more power at the same voltage. Generally it makes little difference for drills, which don't need as much power and don't draw a high maximum current, but it does make a difference for saws.
Jr. Member
Feb 12, 2017
119 posts
81 upvotes
Scote64 wrote: No, the amp-hour rating has nothing to do with power and torque. It's only run time.

There is a separate spec for the larger batteries to do with maximum current output. Larger batteries made for more power-hungry tools like saws can output a higher maximum current, allowing the tool to develop more power at the same voltage. Generally it makes little difference for drills, which don't need as much power and don't draw a high maximum current, but it does make a difference for saws.
reallllly?

has you tried to drill an one inch hole in a 4x4 before?
tried it! ( with 1.5ah then 3 or higher)
report back after.

I guarantee you that a 1.5/2,0 battery powered drill will be NOT go through, yet the 1.5ah battery will still be full.
it just not giving enough power.



,
Deal Addict
Nov 12, 2006
1685 posts
685 upvotes
London
althegreat wrote: wrong!

larger Ah rating DOES give you more power and torque.
althegreat wrote: reallllly?

I guarantee you that a 1.5/2,0 battery powered drill will be NOT go through, yet the 1.5ah battery will still be full.
it just not giving enough power.
You are arguing 2 different things.

In the first, the analogy is you're saying that a car with a larger fuel tank will go faster.
Wrong.

In the second, you're saying that car will run out of fuel prior to going the distance.
Possibly.

The smaller battery will perform the task just as well, during the time it has sufficient charge.
It will just drain faster.
If drilling one hole drains it, you have a bad battery, bad bit, or human error.
Newbie
Oct 22, 2019
4 posts
19 upvotes
Generally larger AH batteries have addition parallel sets of cells which allow for more current than a single set of cells. More current = more power.
Sr. Member
Dec 10, 2012
955 posts
586 upvotes
Richmond Hill
arisk wrote: You are arguing 2 different things.

In the first, the analogy is you're saying that a car with a larger fuel tank will go faster.
Wrong.

In the second, you're saying that car will run out of fuel prior to going the distance.
Possibly.

The smaller battery will perform the task just as well, during the time it has sufficient charge.
It will just drain faster.
If drilling one hole drains it, you have a bad battery, bad bit, or human error.
wrong analogy.

With battery packs higher Amh rating of 3 or more means they have doubled the number of batteries
and have connected them is parallel to giving you more torque/power.

Proper analogy will be car running on 4 cylinders at 1.5 and at 3 or 5 would be like adding 4 more cylinders giving you more horse power.
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2018
2511 posts
2482 upvotes
Vancouver
swd123 wrote: Generally larger AH batteries have addition parallel sets of cells which allow for more current than a single set of cells. More current = more power.
This is approximately the right idea, but having more cells does not necessarily mean that the battery pack will deliver more current. It depends on the design of the cells themselves, and the current-limiting feature of the smart battery pack controller that prevents it from overheating.

There are lots of Youtube video tests that test things like the cutting speed of saws with different battery packs, and the results are not always what you would expect strictly from the amp-hours ratings. Some tests discuss the impact of the battery packs using different cells (e.g. 18650 vs 21700 cells), and different generations designed for higher current delivery like the Milwaukee battery packs designated XC.

Generally the larger battery packs are able to deliver more current (= more power) for a longer time, but not always. It's incorrect to use the amp-hour rating as a stand-in for maximum current capacity. This is especially true with 3rd-party replacement battery packs, where you may be misled by comparing the amp-hours rating without knowing how the max current capacity compares.

I've never noticed any difference in maximum power with my drills using smaller or larger battery packs, and I always use my largest battery pack with my saws, because the smaller ones drain too quickly. All the tests I've seen use saws for comparison because of the higher power requirement. I guess it's theoretically possible that drill doing a really tough job at maximum torque could benefit from a battery pack with higher current capacity, although I suspect that overheating protection would kick in fairly quickly if that were the case.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 25, 2011
4062 posts
9408 upvotes
Quebec
sirxterminator wrote: wrong analogy.

With battery packs higher Amh rating of 3 or more means they have doubled the number of batteries
and have connected them is parallel to giving you more torque/power.

Proper analogy will be car running on 4 cylinders at 1.5 and at 3 or 5 would be like adding 4 more cylinders giving you more horse power.
In my opinion, every intervention in RFD deserve a "thanks". Thanks given until now: more than 100,000

Giving "Likes" gives cancer.... Don't do it!!!!
Sr. Member
User avatar
Jun 14, 2017
816 posts
791 upvotes
isrdum wrote: For 20$ more, I would go with thoses two kits!
They are brushless and 2.0Ah
https://www.homedepot.ca/product/milwau ... 1001185128
https://www.homedepot.ca/product/milwau ... 1001185129

I picked up this one and used the $5 off newsletter discount. Using this for my Clam ice auger conversion and love it. This is a "special edition" bundle. Says on the box. Great value for a Milwaukee brushless

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/milwau ... 1001185128
Deal Addict
Nov 12, 2006
1685 posts
685 upvotes
London
Scote64 wrote: It's incorrect to use the amp-hour rating as a stand-in for maximum current capacity.
Important statement.

Ah is always always a measurement of the amount of charge.
Milwaukee, or anyone else, can't change that definition.

It may be that in their higher Ah batteries, they have simultaneously increased the current limit.
That is a separate specification.
In practice, that would amount to higher power, but is not due to an Ah rating.
It appears people confuse that.

The powered device also has to be able to make use of that current capability of the battery.
Basic electricity rules still apply.
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2018
2511 posts
2482 upvotes
Vancouver
networksend wrote: "This coupon has expired." Damn
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