Expired Hot Deals

[Home Depot] Pelonis 1500 watt Oil-Filled Radiant Heater 59.98

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 14th, 2017 12:31 pm
Member
Sep 9, 2005
269 posts
61 upvotes
Hamilton,Ontario
How safe are these heaters? My daughter's bedroom is colder than all the other rooms my main concern is how safe these thing are?
“To alcohol! The cause of, and solution to, all of life’s problems.”

Homer J
Newbie
Nov 27, 2011
34 posts
73 upvotes
Ottawa
[removed]

BTW, these are in the Ottawa flyer also, I will check in store tomorrow.
Last edited by Mars2012 on Oct 12th, 2017 6:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: quote and your response were removed
Deal Addict
Feb 8, 2015
1259 posts
529 upvotes
North York, ON
Owned 3 of these and used them in the cottage pre reno. Low insulated walls (3 1/2" fibreglass), 2" foam in floor/ open crawlspace. Takes a while to heat up but did the trick for a 600 sq ft/ 2 BR building. Could use the cottage until -10 Celsius. Was surprised as they were easy on the hydro. Now renovated/ expanded- 2500 sq ft and have 2 left in case of emergency- gave 1 away to another RFDer. Thermostat works quite well- 18 heat settings.
Deal Addict
Mar 31, 2008
1017 posts
736 upvotes
Airdrie
I'll have to look at this. I bought a Pelonis 1500 watt heater at Home Depot about a month ago. There were none on the floor and an associate had to get the giant ladder and get one from the top of the aisle. When he price checked it it was $39.99, and I grabbed one. After googling it I thought mybe it was a price error as they were going for around $80. I should have grabbed another.

Using it in an insulated garage on a timer for 3 hours each night. It hasnt got super cold out yet (-7 overnight) but it keeps it above freezing which was the goal.
Member
Aug 28, 2016
225 posts
399 upvotes
I bought a couple of these when my furnace died in the winter last year, I had to wait till the following week to install a new one. I will say these may be safe, but wow they suck, I think one ceramic $40 space heater can do about as much as five of theses radiant heaters. I understand they might both have their uses. But if energy efficiency is a concern at all avoid radiant heaters.

I know that’s a pretty scathing review of radiant heater, maybe there are some that are better. But unless I have to, I’ll stick with the $40 ceramic space heater.
Sr. Member
Jun 21, 2007
922 posts
168 upvotes
Milton, ON
Do these oil filled heaters draw 1500 watts all time or do they draw less power after they warm up?
Deal Fanatic
Nov 19, 2003
5037 posts
2320 upvotes
A Place to Stand
tomw wrote: Do these oil filled heaters draw 1500 watts all time or do they draw less power after they warm up?
No they don't draw that power all the time. They heat up the oil inside until it reaches the required temperature, and then the power kicks off to it as the oil slowly cools off. When the oil cools off too much, the power kicks back on to it and it warms the oil up again. The theory being that the hot oil filled fins are still giving off heat into the room for a while even as no electricity is being used in the process for periods, presumably making them more energy efficient.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Apr 18, 2013
3264 posts
1396 upvotes
Canada
Anyone know if Pelonis is a good quality brand?
Deal Addict
Feb 29, 2012
2654 posts
1454 upvotes
Richmond
Mike2258 wrote: I bought a couple of these when my furnace died in the winter last year, I had to wait till the following week to install a new one. I will say these may be safe, but wow they suck, I think one ceramic $40 space heater can do about as much as five of theses radiant heaters. I understand they might both have their uses. But if energy efficiency is a concern at all avoid radiant heaters.

I know that’s a pretty scathing review of radiant heater, maybe there are some that are better. But unless I have to, I’ll stick with the $40 ceramic space heater.
All electrical appliances that draw 1500 watts of power put out 1500 watts of heat with 100% efficiency. It doesn't matter what the appliance is, whether it was intended as a heater or not.

If the heater is set to max, or set to hold a temperature higher than the actual room temperature, it will stay on full power at 1500 watts continuously.

The difference between an oil-filled radiator heater and a fan heater with a ceramic heating element is the thermal inertia. The oil-filled radiator takes longer to distribute the heat around the room, but conversely it will hold its heat longer when it's cycling on and off at the set temperature. A fan heater heats the air in the room faster, but the room cools down quicker when it shuts off, so it will tend to cycle on and off faster around the set temperature, with a little more noise and distraction than the quiet oil heater.

So the oil-filled radiator heater is great for maintaining a small-to-medium size closed room at a constant temperature over a long period, while the fan heater is better at warming up a room faster, and responding faster if the room is leaky.
Deal Addict
May 21, 2004
2284 posts
1404 upvotes
GTA
Despite what I was told by the Home Depot rep on the phone, I decided to go instore and try my luck. Sure enough, they had them in stock! For a person who's being paid by Home Depot, that rep really is doing them a disservice by giving out such terrible and untrue information.
Member
Dec 26, 2004
418 posts
138 upvotes
I just so happened to be looking for a heater tonight. Was at Costco and saw the Lasko Ceramic Tower Heater for $59.99 (Costco Item 1146038) but I also saw the Pelonis electric oil-filled heater.

The info above it good but I'm still on the fence on which one is better for a small 1BR suite. I like the Lasko as it rotates and is compact but it sounds like if I want to keep the temp in the room steady, the Pelonis would be better.
Sr. Member
Jan 23, 2003
960 posts
169 upvotes
Mississauga
Not sure if this will help, but my experience with the two type of heaters:

Ceramic heaters tend to provide instant directed heat on demand. You can turn it off when you don't need it (won't be home for 10 hours). It's nice when you want instant heat after being outside in the freezing cold, or if you want to 'blow-dry' something. However ceramic heaters are basically a form of distributed fan heating, so they generate fan noise. If fan noise bothers you, this is a no go, same if you don't like 'blowing air.' The fan does help to distribute the air, but this can be both a pro and a con.

Oil heaters tend to heat up the surrounding area (and only the surrounding area) very slowly. If you turn it off when you don't need it, when you come home, turn it on, it will take hours before you will feel the heat. It is best to leave them running. They are non-directed and could heat up parts of the room you don't want heated (e.g. electronics). As this is not fan-based directional heating, it is nearly silent. (You will hear it flick on and off from the thermostat every hour or so). Oil heaters also tend to be take up more space.

Overall it is really personal preference, some like the 'on demand' heat and some prefer quietness of oil heaters.

I guess warranty is also something to consider, Costco would probably take it back for free, years later, no questions asked, Home Depot probably won't take it back past 30 days.
Fanatic wrote: I just so happened to be looking for a heater tonight. Was at Costco and saw the Lasko Ceramic Tower Heater for $59.99 (Costco Item 1146038) but I also saw the Pelonis electric oil-filled heater.

The info above it good but I'm still on the fence on which one is better for a small 1BR suite. I like the Lasko as it rotates and is compact but it sounds like if I want to keep the temp in the room steady, the Pelonis would be better.
Banned
Jul 20, 2017
33 posts
26 upvotes
Does this heater have an odor while operating?

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