Hot Deals

Home Depot

RIDGID March / April Promo -- Buy a Select RIDGID Tool, Get a FREE 2Ah/4Ah Starter Kit -- Ends May 18th

  • Last Updated:
  • May 14th, 2022 9:18 pm
Jr. Member
Mar 5, 2004
104 posts
63 upvotes
vkizzle wrote: Not sure how folks are struggling with wheel lug nuts.
I’ve not been able to figure it out either. Perhaps they don’t have the top switch all the way to the right on “3”.

I know I once in a while leave it in 1 and think why did it not immediately loosen the nut. Flick the switch to the right and bam it loosens everything on first hammmer. I do 3 cars and 1 truck and it’s never taken more than a split second to loosen the nuts. No it could not do a badly rusted hub nut, but neither could a 6’ breaker bar that I bent.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 5, 2007
7848 posts
7999 upvotes
Inno wrote: Maybe they are up against lugnuts that their mechanic tightened to 1,000 ft.-lbs.
At that number I'd expect a lug to either sheer or something else to go wrong.
Sr. Member
Jun 15, 2021
607 posts
509 upvotes
vkizzle wrote: Not sure how folks are struggling with wheel lug nuts.
What is people use the 1.5 or 2ah battery instead of 4?
WTB amazon.ca gc @ 90%
Deal Addict
Jan 13, 2004
1262 posts
676 upvotes
Vancouver
MrBungal wrote: What is people use the 1.5 or 2ah battery instead of 4?
I think it's more likely the user is using a worn out battery that has developed high internal resistance.
Jr. Member
Dec 17, 2015
179 posts
108 upvotes
I used a fully charged normal 2ah battery with the 1/2" impact wrench and it removed lugs off 2 vehicles and it used 1 bar off the battery.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 22, 2009
3148 posts
1376 upvotes
Lethbridge
JEDI Force wrote: Ridgid are not budget cheap tools. They are not as good as Makita, Bosch, DeWalt or Milwaukee but they are not budget tools, they are above average for DIYers. Budget tools are Jobmate, Hyper Tough and the likes...

You are in for a rough reality check if you think Ridgid are cheap budget tools next time the brother in law or neighbor asks for help and you see his tools...
I think it gets a bit of a bad wrap for the bright orange/cheap looking plastic & the fact their an HD house brand honestly... Price vs performance can't be beat though.

My neighbour brags about his POWER FIST stuff from Princess Auto all the time, lol. Some of their stuff is actually pretty good, especially the single use stuff (why pay $50 for something that I can get for $10 and collect dust), but man a lot of that line is just off-shore junk.
Deal Addict
Jan 13, 2004
1262 posts
676 upvotes
Vancouver
six0four wrote: I used a fully charged normal 2ah battery with the 1/2" impact wrench and it removed lugs off 2 vehicles and it used 1 bar off the battery.
You shouldn't lose any bars removing only 2 lug nuts. How long did you impact them for?
Jr. Member
Dec 17, 2015
179 posts
108 upvotes
turbo_slug wrote: You shouldn't lose any bars removing only 2 lug nuts. How long did you impact them for?
Lugs off two vehicles, so 5x4 per car x 2 cars in total. I also used it to put lugs back on before torquing it to spec with a torque wrench.
Deal Addict
Jan 13, 2004
1262 posts
676 upvotes
Vancouver
six0four wrote: Lugs off two vehicles, so 5x4 per car x 2 cars in total. I also used it to put lugs back on before torquing it to spec with a torque wrench.
Whoops. Misread the post as 2 lug nuts instead of two vehicles. Anyhow, that sounds about right.
Sr. Member
Jul 11, 2007
519 posts
133 upvotes
GTA
what is the canadiantire deal?
Sr. Member
Jul 11, 2007
519 posts
133 upvotes
GTA
DanielB97750 wrote: I own both the mid-torque Ridgid impact and the high-torque. I would NOT recommend the high torque if you plan to only have one impact. It's way more expensive, super heavy (and big), and waaaay overkill for 99.99% of DIY applications.

The mid-torque impact is what you want if you're only going to have one impact. It has been my workhorse for many years now and never skipped a beat (a 6 ah or 9 ah Octane battery helps a lot too!).

I do a LOT of DIY mechanic work. Have rebuilt many suspensions on multiple old, rusty full-size trucks, which is where you usually run into fasteners that are seized and require lots of torque. I have yet to actually run into a fastener that the mid-torque couldn't handle. Everything from removing rusted-on 33 mm axle nuts (which have a factory torque spec of almost 200 ft-lbs to begin with), to pressing out 15 year old ball-joints, the mid-torque does it all with ease. The few bolts it has failed to remove were control-arm bolts seized inside large bushings, in which case the high-torque impact was equally useless. Those require either a very powerful air-chisel to knock out or a saw to cut out.

I bought the high-torque as a "just-in-case" tool, so believe me when I say I've looked for ways to justify its existence. But it sits mostly unused, all nice and clean compared to my dirty and beat up mid-torque that just keeps working.

For anyone considering an impact wrench for general use, get the mid-torque. If you end up doing enough car work, you will eventually find that a sub-compact is very handy to have also, in which case I highly recommend the Milwaukee M12 Stubby 1/2". Haven't used the Ridgid sub-compact, but it's bulkier and tests on youtube show the Milwaukee stubby outperforms just about every other sub-compact (despite being on a 12V platform). A sub-compact impact wrench is a "nice-to-have", but it shouldn't be your only impact wrench.

The high-torque is truly a specialized tool. If you own a rust-bucket 1-ton truck and/or heavy farm equipment, then maybe it's worth having on hand.
do you think the mid-torque will be enough to remove the crank bolt on a Acura/Honda? I want to save some money DIY timing belt and bunch other suspension stuff on an old and occasional vehicle (MDX) this summer. I read enough stories about how difficult getting the crank bolt off. Originally I was going to get the high torque (R86211B) to assist the works, but after more reading, I wonder if the mid torque will be sufficient ? thanks for any advise.
Deal Addict
Jan 13, 2004
1262 posts
676 upvotes
Vancouver
gogozy wrote: do you think the mid-torque will be enough to remove the crank bolt on a Acura/Honda? I want to save some money DIY timing belt and bunch other suspension stuff on an old and occasional vehicle (MDX) this summer. I read enough stories about how difficult getting the crank bolt off. Originally I was going to get the high torque (R86211B) to assist the works, but after more reading, I wonder if the mid torque will be sufficient ? thanks for any advise.
No, you'll need the high torque impact wrench. You might even need to use a special extra heavy 19mm impact socket.

On the other hand, I've sucessfully removed honda crank pulley bolts using two 24" $10 breaker bars, a long cheater pipe, and a $25 honda crank pulley holder. This is the cheaper option if you don't want to buy an expensive tool that you'll use only one time.
Sr. Member
Jul 11, 2007
519 posts
133 upvotes
GTA
turbo_slug wrote: No, you'll need the high torque impact wrench. You might even need to use a special extra heavy 19mm impact socket.

On the other hand, I've sucessfully removed honda crank pulley bolts using two 24" breaker bars, a long cheater pipe, and a honda crank pulley holder.
thanks for the advise! then I will order both soon before more inflation. I had been using on the breaker bar, and something having issue with clearance, at home garage.
Newbie
Aug 12, 2019
47 posts
56 upvotes
gogozy wrote: do you think the mid-torque will be enough to remove the crank bolt on a Acura/Honda? I want to save some money DIY timing belt and bunch other suspension stuff on an old and occasional vehicle (MDX) this summer. I read enough stories about how difficult getting the crank bolt off. Originally I was going to get the high torque (R86211B) to assist the works, but after more reading, I wonder if the mid torque will be sufficient ? thanks for any advise.
181 ft-lb torque spec? ez pz for the mid-torque. Use an octane battery if you have one and you'll be golden.
Member
Dec 31, 2012
251 posts
142 upvotes
Ottawa
Do you still need to use a breaker bar to loosen lugs or is it fine doing it with the torque wrench?
Newbie
Sep 29, 2012
40 posts
42 upvotes
Delta
turbo_slug wrote: No, you'll need the high torque impact wrench. You might even need to use a special extra heavy 19mm impact socket.

On the other hand, I've sucessfully removed honda crank pulley bolts using two 24" $10 breaker bars, a long cheater pipe, and a $25 honda crank pulley holder. This is the cheaper option if you don't want to buy an expensive tool that you'll use only one time.

This is the correct information. My cheater pipe snapped when the crank bolt finally gave and loosened. When the pipe snapped in half, it came up and took a nice chunk out of my arm. Scar lasted for years, and I should have used a high torque impact. My guess is about 5-600 ft/lbs of torque to break a stubborn crank pulley bolt loose.
Deal Addict
Nov 7, 2018
2146 posts
1579 upvotes
Ttraww wrote: Do you still need to use a breaker bar to loosen lugs or is it fine doing it with the torque wrench?
Torque wrench is for tightening only. You usually don't need breaker bar if you have impact wrench unless
Deal Fanatic
Mar 5, 2007
7848 posts
7999 upvotes
Ttraww wrote: Do you still need to use a breaker bar to loosen lugs or is it fine doing it with the torque wrench?
A torque wrench should only be used for torqueing up, never for removing lugs/nuts/bolts

Top

Thread Information

There is currently 1 user viewing this thread. (0 members and 1 guest)