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RYOBI 18V ONE+ AirStrike 16-Gauge Cordless Finish Nailer $149 YMMV

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 26th, 2022 6:28 pm
Sr. Member
Dec 12, 2019
761 posts
581 upvotes
jbone14 wrote: PVC trims have a place but its really only in the bathroom where water contact or extreme humidity/moisture may occur. For instance if you have trim that goes within 18" of your shower then PVC would be suitable such as we did in my master bath. The previous owner used MDF but the baseboard comes to 8" of the walk-in shower and has been damaged by water. I wouldn't waste your money using it around a window unless the window was in a shed and prone to extreme moisture. Its nice stuff but very costly and not quite as forgiving and you have to use silicone.

The brad nailer is absolutely PERFECT for door and window. I was using 1.5" nails into the frame and its rock solid. I know multiple contractors who do the same. The Ryboi nailer is awesome too as you can adjust the depth of the nail for the material. The finish nailer is nice but its an awkward gauge size as its big enough to split material if you're tighter to the edge as you can be on some doors and windows especially in older houses. Just my two cents. I spoke to a number of contractor friends prior to taking the leap on the 18ga and so happy I did its perfect all around.

I do however want to get a pin nailer as well for detail trim as 18 and 16 just split anything less than 3/4" it seems like.
dirtmover wrote: I don't agree with your use case for finish nailers with trim. As someone who has both, about 95% of the trim work I've done over the last couple of decades has been with a 18ga brad nailers. They're plenty strong enough, easier to work with, easier to clean up the entry holes and pose less risk to the work piece and user.

Unless you have a specific use for 16ga nails I'd suggest an 18ga brad nailer is the more versatile option. On the odd occasion you need more holding power you can always double up which will give you more strength and holding power than a single 16ga nail.
Alright then what’s the use cases for finish nailers in general if they aren’t suited for trims?
Deal Addict
Oct 11, 2005
1473 posts
2804 upvotes
Airdrie, AB
ferret4it wrote: I saw this combo deal which includes both a 16 ga and an 18 ga nailer as well as a battery and charger for $349. It's out of stock right now but wouldn't this be a better deal?

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/ryobi- ... 1001074038
Naw... if you're going to spend $349, you may as well get the $149 finish nailer along with this kit for $199:
https://www.homedepot.ca/product/1001617210

For the same money, you'd get an extra drill, plus a couple of 1.5 Ah batteries, instead of just a 1.3 Ah.
Member
Jul 27, 2016
237 posts
154 upvotes
victoria
WalletNotSafe wrote: I went the brad nailer route and it worked okay for my baseboards using 2" nails. Other than that, I actually think brad nails are a bit more versatile for what most people would use a nailer (DIY/woodworking hobby).

I also vouch on the adapter thing. I use my Ridgid batteries on a number of Ryobi tools.
Where did you get your adapter ridgid to Ryobi? Want to do something similar for tools I don't use often.
Newbie
May 19, 2009
72 posts
29 upvotes
DominicL044247 wrote: Where did you get your adapter ridgid to Ryobi? Want to do something similar for tools I don't use often.
I am in the Ryobi ecosystem but I actually got the ridgid adapter for my MIL from someone on here who makes them using a 3d printer. Was over a year ago and it is still working great. She had to have the dual inflator I was raving about but she has all Ridgid. I can’t recall his name. Will look it up if interested. He charged around $40 I think.
Member
Feb 23, 2010
226 posts
183 upvotes
I got this nailer on Nov 30th for 229 and haven't opened it yet.. think they would price match it?

Edit: nvm I orderd for pickup and did get the $149 deal, thanks OP. Will see if original HD will price match my purchase, otherwise I guess I can just return the first purchase and pick up the new one.
Newbie
Nov 22, 2017
86 posts
17 upvotes
Surrey
Is this brushless? Can't seem to find the info
Member
Feb 7, 2007
337 posts
247 upvotes
Toronto
I wouldn't use this for trim. I have both 18ga and 16ga nailers and the heads on 16ga are so much bigger and tougher to fill than 18ga for trim.
Jr. Member
May 25, 2020
164 posts
285 upvotes
DominicL044247 wrote: Where did you get your adapter ridgid to Ryobi? Want to do something similar for tools I don't use often.


There is a fella here that makes and sells them for around $40-$55. @SquadG - not sure if he's still doing it.

I actually ended up buying mine from ebay because SquadG didn't have stock when I was looking for one.

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Badaptor-Ridgid ... 632-2357-0

Mine was $20USD at the time. I messaged him and he was willing to ship to Canada for an extra $20. So mine came in at $40 USD delivered. No taxes or duties. This version is a retail version from a brand that does these adaptors. Made in Taiwan, which is where I think a lot of Ridgid tools are made. It's very heavy duty with very thick plastic.
Deal Addict
Oct 2, 2013
3010 posts
3271 upvotes
Montreal
DominicL044247 wrote:
Where did you get your adapter ridgid to Ryobi? Want to do something similar for tools I don't use often.
WalletNotSafe wrote: There is a fella here that makes and sells them for around $40-$55. @SquadG - not sure if he's still doing it.

I actually ended up buying mine from ebay because SquadG didn't have stock when I was looking for one.

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Badaptor-Ridgid ... 632-2357-0

Mine was $20USD at the time. I messaged him and he was willing to ship to Canada for an extra $20. So mine came in at $40 USD delivered. No taxes or duties. This version is a retail version from a brand that does these adaptors. Made in Taiwan, which is where I think a lot of Ridgid tools are made. It's very heavy duty with very thick plastic.
Thanks!

Yes I have some available. They are $40 ea and shipping is $10. Can be picked up locally to avoid shipping.

Also have some Ridgid to Dewalt.
Sr. Member
Nov 18, 2008
778 posts
333 upvotes
Toronto
Randyb13 wrote: Is this brushless? Can't seem to find the info
I believe I saw at HD’s web site someone asked that question and support answered - no, brushed motor.
Newbie
Feb 8, 2009
47 posts
24 upvotes
Online order worked in KW.

Confirmation email shows $168.xx final price.

Thanks OP
Deal Addict
Jan 31, 2011
1041 posts
597 upvotes
Toronto
Is anyone having issue with the depth control on this P325? I tried to play with different settings of the depth control knob and the air pressure lever, but it's always either sinking too deep into the wood (2x4) or it didn't sink in completely. There's nothing in between and I wanted the nail to be near flush with the wood.

I also found that the spring loaded loading mechanism sound ingenious at first. But once you're left with a short strip of nails ( less than 10), it became difficult to load/unload from the magazine as the nail head will tip on one side causing friction in the channel.
Sr. Member
Nov 18, 2008
778 posts
333 upvotes
Toronto
I got mine yesterday brand new in box but I’m kind of hesitating if I should return it for two reasons:

#1: Here is a thing, I have a pneumatic brad nailer and it’s fantastic. Having both cordless and pneumatic is nice to have but kind of doesn’t make sense for me. If I need a finish nailer, I can get pneumatic nailer for the same price as this. I think this makes more sense for people who don’t have an air compressor.

#2: The reviews are mixed, a lot of people seem to complain that it doesn’t fire sometimes or it doesn’t sink nails all the way in no matter the adjustment.

By the way, noticing how heavy the box is. It’s day and night in weight difference between this and pneumatic nailer. My pneumatic brad nailer is lightweight and super compact.
Last edited by samguan on Jan 16th, 2022 10:18 am, edited 3 times in total.
Newbie
Jul 22, 2010
95 posts
206 upvotes
Montreal
I'm returning mine. Found I was unable to use it for baseboard trims for the bottom molding due to its bulk. Will stick with the 18 Ga.

And before you ask, yes I did try upside down and it was the same result.

When I was going at it at an angle, the nails didn't penetrate all the way, there was easily still 1/4 - 3/8 exposed.
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Last edited by rickytenzer on Jan 16th, 2022 10:15 am, edited 2 times in total.
Sr. Member
Nov 18, 2008
778 posts
333 upvotes
Toronto
rickytenzer wrote: I'm returning mine. Found I was unable to use it for baseboard trims for the bottom molding due to its bulk. Will stick with the 18 Ga.
Is it too bulky that you have trouble pointing the gun at a certain angle without hitting the floor? I find this thing is huge compared to a pneumatic gun.
Newbie
Jul 22, 2010
95 posts
206 upvotes
Montreal
samguan wrote: Is it too bulky that you have trouble pointing the gun at a certain angle without hitting the floor? I find this thing is huge compared to a pneumatic gun.
I attached some photos
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
4667 posts
1939 upvotes
WFH
xxxibgdrgn wrote: Alright then what’s the use cases for finish nailers in general if they aren’t suited for trims?
Well, of course you can use a 16ga nailer for trim if you wish and it will work fine. I merely offered my own opinion based on over 20 years of experience.

Maybe the best thing you can do is go buy both and come back and tell us which you prefer to work with after you've nailed, filled and painted a few hundred feet of trim with each.

An 18ga gun with a box of 2" and a box of 1" brads will serve well for most homeowner diy jobs.

Now, if you're about to put up 1" thick baseboards or a 12" crown a 16ga nailer with 2½" nails is a more appropriate choice.

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