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schlage camelot keypad deadbolt - $89 with Price Match at HD, Also Touch Keypad for $94.50 (reg $189.90)

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 14th, 2022 8:14 pm
Deal Addict
Feb 18, 2007
2036 posts
4130 upvotes
Vancouver
n1ng wrote: Had this for a couple of years. Used for the door to the garage. Replaced it because the lock would not engage when the temperature dropped below 0°c. If my garage was heated or I was using it on my front door (where one side is heated) then this may not occur.

Replaced it with a mechanical lock, no batteries, very reliable, but less secure.
These types of lock are to allow more than one person/user to use.

For example I frequent my friends garage, it would be very inconvenient to either get a key or to give multiple people keys that need access
Newbie
Dec 1, 2012
48 posts
17 upvotes
I pulled a sneaky move....

Bought two different times price matched at HD. First one I switched the color when placing the order after they guaranteed the price match no issues.

Second one I tried to do the same thing and the agent caught the different stock number.

Currently have two on the way two different colors.

Thanks Op.
Newbie
User avatar
Feb 27, 2019
50 posts
180 upvotes
I bought this two days ago and installed it. Worked so well for the first two days but today decided to stop working. Great.
Sr. Member
Jul 23, 2018
722 posts
296 upvotes
Scote64 wrote: I see $99 on the HH web site. Good price. This model has ANSI grade 2 security, slightly better than the basic cheap units, and the battery lasts a long time because it uses a manual-turn knob instead of a motor. On the other hand it has a notorious fault where a pin pops loose internally, preventing the knob from engaging, and you have to dismount it and open it up to fix.
By manual turn knob vs. motor do we need to unlock and then turn the level to fully unlock the door?
Member
Oct 7, 2007
333 posts
119 upvotes
Rider Nation
hallieliu wrote: My front door has a smaller hole. We don’t have the tools to make it bigger. Will a locksmith normally do it?

Or do you by any chance know which electronic lock fits the smaller hole?

Thank you.
WEISER will fit the smaller hole.
If you have a drill. You can buy the jig kit around 30 bucks to bore the hole bigger at a big box store. Just watch your backset setting on the jig if you do decide to pursue doing it yourself. Ryobi , Milwaukee Irwin, have kits available
Deal Fanatic
Jan 21, 2018
6561 posts
6871 upvotes
Vancouver
OongaLoonga wrote: By manual turn knob vs. motor do we need to unlock and then turn the level to fully unlock the door?
The deadbolt lever is moved by the knob, just like a regular deadbolt. The electronic combination mechanism activates a pin that engages the knob to the deadbolt. Otherwise it spins freely.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 9, 2010
3069 posts
1213 upvotes
Windsor
hallieliu wrote: My front door has a smaller hole. We don’t have the tools to make it bigger. Will a locksmith normally do it?

Or do you by any chance know which electronic lock fits the smaller hole?

Thank you.
Basically nothing fits the smaller hole. I presume a locksmith can enlarge the hole, or you can do it yourself with a hole saw. You'll need a hole saw the size of your existing hole, a hole saw the size of the hole you need to make, the arbor they attach to, and a drill. Screw the larger hole saw to the arbor. Screw the smaller hole saw inside the larger hole saw. Drill as normal (the smaller hole saw will align the larger one).

Alternatively, you can get a guide that you clamp to the door (or make one; it's just a hole cut through a piece of material @ the right distance), then you just need the 1 hole saw, arbor, drill, and a clamp.
One who is offended by truth, has no place among those who seek wisdom.
Sr. Member
May 14, 2018
639 posts
137 upvotes
Toronto
ChubChub wrote: Basically nothing fits the smaller hole. I presume a locksmith can enlarge the hole, or you can do it yourself with a hole saw. You'll need a hole saw the size of your existing hole, a hole saw the size of the hole you need to make, the arbor they attach to, and a drill. Screw the larger hole saw to the arbor. Screw the smaller hole saw inside the larger hole saw. Drill as normal (the smaller hole saw will align the larger one).

Alternatively, you can get a guide that you clamp to the door (or make one; it's just a hole cut through a piece of material @ the right distance), then you just need the 1 hole saw, arbor, drill, and a clamp.
Thanks for your response. I’m in similar situation, I’m worried about the front door, I noticed there is thin steel plate is placed in the front and back parts of the whole door. If I mess up then it will be a big issue. That’s why I dropped this project of smart door lock in our house.

Please correct me there is a good way to resolve this issue.

Thanks
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 9, 2010
3069 posts
1213 upvotes
Windsor
dontelother wrote: Thanks for your response. I’m in similar situation, I’m worried about the front door, I noticed there is thin steel plate is placed in the front and back parts of the whole door. If I mess up then it will be a big issue. That’s why I dropped this project of smart door lock in our house.

Please correct me there is a good way to resolve this issue.
The "good" way is to enlarge the hole. My door was as you described; wood door, thin sheet-metal fascia on both sides. I just made a jig with a scrap piece of 2x6" and a hole saw (I already owned the hole saw). To get through the first layer of sheet metal, I took it easy, then the wood part I whipped through pretty quick. Once I was almost all the way through the door, I moved my jig to the other side and continued going thru, going very slow once I get to the sheet metal part (I think I actually cut through the second sheet metal in reverse). Regardless, even if you mangle the door a bit, the fixture is plenty big to cover up your boo-boo.

You can then install anything you want. You can buy a jig as well (randomly selected) : https://www.homedepot.ca/product/milwau ... 1000804864
One who is offended by truth, has no place among those who seek wisdom.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Jan 6, 2005
12100 posts
3423 upvotes
jeffgao wrote: I used a silicone based lubricant (Jig-A-Loo) on the internal spring and it worked great.
Our old lock, used to do this, I would take it apart clean everything and it'd be good for a little while and start doing it again, anytime we had negative degree weather. Have never put a lube in there, Our new one is working well, slips slightly sometimes, but will still engage enough to get into the house. Does the lube keep it engaging for a long time?
The first rule of RFD is, you do not talk about RFD.

The second rule of RFD is, you DO NOT talk about RFD.
Deal Addict
Aug 27, 2003
1916 posts
1178 upvotes
ChubChub wrote: Basically nothing fits the smaller hole. I presume a locksmith can enlarge the hole, or you can do it yourself with a hole saw. You'll need a hole saw the size of your existing hole, a hole saw the size of the hole you need to make, the arbor they attach to, and a drill. Screw the larger hole saw to the arbor. Screw the smaller hole saw inside the larger hole saw. Drill as normal (the smaller hole saw will align the larger one).

Alternatively, you can get a guide that you clamp to the door (or make one; it's just a hole cut through a piece of material @ the right distance), then you just need the 1 hole saw, arbor, drill, and a clamp.
ChubChub wrote: The "good" way is to enlarge the hole. My door was as you described; wood door, thin sheet-metal fascia on both sides. I just made a jig with a scrap piece of 2x6" and a hole saw (I already owned the hole saw). To get through the first layer of sheet metal, I took it easy, then the wood part I whipped through pretty quick. Once I was almost all the way through the door, I moved my jig to the other side and continued going thru, going very slow once I get to the sheet metal part (I think I actually cut through the second sheet metal in reverse). Regardless, even if you mangle the door a bit, the fixture is plenty big to cover up your boo-boo.

You can then install anything you want. You can buy a jig as well (randomly selected) : https://www.homedepot.ca/product/milwau ... 1000804864
I used similar methods as those mentioned above on two doors.

Tips:
- Use double hole saw to centre the existing hole to the large hole you want to drill AND use a (homemade) jig. When initially drilling through the metal layer, the saw will jump around a bit. The jig will help protect the surrounding area.
- Drill through the metal layer at LOW speed. If you drill too fast, you'll damage your saw and make it harder to drill through the metal layer on the other side. Use some cutting oil or other lubrication...something like WD40 will do.
- Drill half way through the door and then move the saw to the other side and drill in to meet in the middle. If you don't do this, you may find that your hole centred on one side, but crooked on the other side.
- This should go without saying, but wear eye protection. You'll get flying bits of metal all over the place. Using cutting oil/lube will help reduce this a bit.
Jr. Member
Jul 29, 2008
198 posts
186 upvotes
jackass_ca wrote: Our old lock, used to do this, I would take it apart clean everything and it'd be good for a little while and start doing it again, anytime we had negative degree weather. Have never put a lube in there, Our new one is working well, slips slightly sometimes, but will still engage enough to get into the house. Does the lube keep it engaging for a long time?
I last lubricated the spring more than 2 years ago and it has still been working well. I think the key is to use silicone-based ones than oil-based products. Otherwise the oil would go thick and gunk up.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Jan 6, 2005
12100 posts
3423 upvotes
jeffgao wrote: I last lubricated the spring more than 2 years ago and it has still been working well. I think the key is to use silicone-based ones than oil-based products. Otherwise the oil would go thick and gunk up.
It never made sense to me why it didn't work though. Nothing was sticking in mine, it was more like the little metal tongue that rides along the spring was skipping a few sections
The first rule of RFD is, you do not talk about RFD.

The second rule of RFD is, you DO NOT talk about RFD.

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