Expired Hot Deals

[home depot usa] $69.29..USA..Home Depot..ATMOR 6 kW Electric Tankless Water Heater Shower System

  • Last Updated:
  • Feb 7th, 2018 11:38 pm
16 replies
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
20591 posts
7709 upvotes
Socially Distanced
It says "0.92 GPM flow rate = 35°F temperature rise"
Considering most showerheads are 2.5GPM i shudder to think how little warming this will provide :facepalm:
Even if you buy a super low flow 1.5 or 2GPM shower head your still going to get poor results
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburders eat people
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 11, 2007
2116 posts
1341 upvotes
Markham
Quentin5 wrote: It says "0.92 GPM flow rate = 35°F temperature rise"
Considering most showerheads are 2.5GPM i shudder to think how little warming this will provide :facepalm:
Even if you buy a super low flow 1.5 or 2GPM shower head your still going to get poor results
Good catch..
-------
Thank you
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Feb 5, 2006
7233 posts
1220 upvotes
Toronto
kunamvahees wrote: Good catch..
This comes with its own air-mixing showerhead doesn't it? So shouldn't it be compatible?
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
20591 posts
7709 upvotes
Socially Distanced
kunamvahees wrote: Good catch..
Thanks, assuming the temperature rise is linear and starting at 10C water (a bit less in winter but lets assume rosy summer) 0.92GPM @ 35F rise would give 13F rise at 2.5GPM, plus the temp of the water coming in would be 63F or 17.2ºC :facepalm:
If we switch to a 1.5GPM shower head we get 22C water. Room temperature :rolleyes:
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburders eat people
Member
Apr 2, 2009
291 posts
335 upvotes
vancouver
My own personal experience with these electric heaters: the smaller models need a ridiculously low flow to get enough temp rise to make any real "hot" water in most cases. I've used a 30A 220v model for a utility sink, and it barely made lukewarm water for hand cleaning. If you're in a pinch and need warm water like I did, they'll (barely) get the job done, but for a shower that's going to get any amount of regular use, you'll need a massive model, and a huge amount of available capacity in your electrical service. When I researched one for a shower, I estimated a 50A 220v model might have been sufficient, but no available capacity killed it right there. An electric tank is far more cost effective for a shower IMO, and you can have HOT water. I see HD Canada now carries smaller Gas instant heaters, which are likely more efficient and suited for shower use, but never heard of the brand before. Always check the reviews!
I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Dec 11, 2004
10183 posts
2804 upvotes
Montreal, QC
In warmer climate, may be OK for a hand faucet with a 0.5GPM faucet full blast hot (warm) without mixing in cold water lol

I personally have a 27kw unit and the water is cold here now, 3C, mine is set to heat it to body temp only, so no hot water, only warm.
Member
Nov 15, 2017
317 posts
622 upvotes
WEST CANADA
one person aprox. 2 hrs of shower per week * 6KW = 12KW/week = 48KW/Month
Price per month = 48KW/Month * 4cents per KW = $1.92

For one person maybe this is cheaper than heating a whole tank of water.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 8, 2014
20591 posts
7709 upvotes
Socially Distanced
zebracobra007 wrote: one person aprox. 2 hrs of shower per week * 6KW = 12KW/week = 48KW/Month
Price per month = 48KW/Month * 4cents per KW = $1.92

For one person maybe this is cheaper than heating a whole tank of water.
If you don't mind showering in room temperature water
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburders eat people
Member
Aug 8, 2006
478 posts
148 upvotes
zebracobra007 wrote: one person aprox. 2 hrs of shower per week * 6KW = 12KW/week = 48KW/Month
Price per month = 48KW/Month * 4cents per KW = $1.92

For one person maybe this is cheaper than heating a whole tank of water.
what if i shower 2 hrs per day
Deal Fanatic
Sep 10, 2008
8389 posts
6419 upvotes
Kitchener
Somehow I don't think this is quite the same as the 199,000BTU tankless water heater I just bought for $1200 ;)
Deal Addict
User avatar
May 3, 2005
2934 posts
290 upvotes
110-120V electric instant hot water heater simply don't work from my experience.
RFD Damage...lost count

HEATWARE
eBay
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Feb 5, 2006
7233 posts
1220 upvotes
Toronto
achc wrote: 110-120V electric instant hot water heater simply don't work from my experience.
Isn't it 220V?
Member
Apr 2, 2009
291 posts
335 upvotes
vancouver
Inno wrote: Isn't it 220V?
The one in the OP link is 220, but 120 or 220 is relatively unimportant; kW is the key factor in determining effectiveness, and for these to heat a significant amount of water on demand to a hot enough temperature, you need a massive element. Gas heaters are far more efficient at transferring heat, but of course it depends on the situation. Regardless, a proper load calculation should be done prior to purchasing any large load like one of these, since it could easily overload average panels.
I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
Newbie
Jun 6, 2007
94 posts
38 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
I suspect that there is something important behind the decision to use 220 on high power appliances like stoves, car chargers or dryers. The wires are pretty thick also. power is i squared r. so the low current maybe to prevent the power cord from heating up.
power lines run in kvolts for low current to prevent heat losses.
Member
Apr 2, 2009
291 posts
335 upvotes
vancouver
Yes, you can run a higher load at lower amperage per phase, thus using a lower gauge wire, but you'll still have to do a proper load calculation for your panel since you're still consuming the same wattage. For example, 6000w @120v is 50A, while 6000w @240v is 25A. Either way, the meter's gonna spin at the same speed :) (wait, do meters even spin anymore?)
I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.

Top