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MAKITA 7-1/4" 15 Amp Circular Saw, with LED Light ($30 off)

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  • Oct 23rd, 2021 1:59 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 3, 2012
37 posts
80 upvotes
MISSISSAUGA

[Home Hardware] MAKITA 7-1/4" 15 Amp Circular Saw, with LED Light ($30 off)

Noticed this in the flyer for HH and has great reviews overall for a DIY'er at least.

Does not appear to have dust collection like a few other circular saws but works for me at this price considering most are selling this used on Kijiji/Marketplace for over $100.
Images
  • !makita-7-14-15-amp-circular-saw-with-led-light-home-hardware-a.jpg
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Last edited by talktomartin on Oct 21st, 2021 2:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
24 replies
Deal Addict
Feb 14, 2012
1031 posts
684 upvotes
Toronto
I love makita to death, but buying a corded saw, especially a left handed one, not for me in this day and age.
Sr. Member
Jan 30, 2010
980 posts
424 upvotes
Canada
that looks like a right handed saw to me.
.
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 3, 2012
37 posts
80 upvotes
MISSISSAUGA
Added a picture on the right handed use of the saw from the website
Member
Jun 15, 2019
415 posts
343 upvotes
Going to buy my first saw, where can I learn saw safety as a newbie
[OP]
Newbie
Jun 3, 2012
37 posts
80 upvotes
MISSISSAUGA
Mine as well, following this guy for now

Deal Addict
Feb 14, 2012
1031 posts
684 upvotes
Toronto
zoso454 wrote: that looks like a right handed saw to me.
He's looking over the tool to see his cut.if it was reversed he wouldn't need to. If you were a right handed tradesperson that uses a saw everyday, you'd understand better. If you use your left hand to cut with this, then you don't need to look over the tool to see your cut, hence left handed.
Sr. Member
Dec 26, 2017
621 posts
434 upvotes
Josecc wrote: I love makita to death, but buying a corded saw, especially a left handed one, not for me in this day and age.
Can you show me a right handed one ? I never knew there is such
Deal Addict
Feb 14, 2012
1031 posts
684 upvotes
Toronto
Benzat17 wrote: Can you show me a right handed one ? I never knew there is such
Use this in your right hand means you don't look over the saw to see your cut.

Google does wonders these days too.
Images
  • Screenshot_20211021-191409_Google.jpg
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 25, 2004
1133 posts
121 upvotes
Toronto
Cordless circular saws are much safer, especially for beginners. Yes they cost more but it's worth the investment.

With corded tools, when you release the trigger, the motor continues to spin with momentum, using friction to slow down and eventually stop. For something as fast as a circular saw, the blade can take several seconds to come to a complete stop, which can do a lot of damage if something goes wrong. Cordless tools have a brake that stops the motor immediately when you release the trigger.

Also, corded circular saws are so powerful that if the blade binds, it can kick back, causing you to lose control of the saw. With cordless, being much less powerful, the motor will just stall if the blade gets stuck. All you have to do is pull back a little until the motor spins back up again, and then keep going.

Plus, obviously there is no cord to step on, get caught, or accidentally cut. So, many of the pitfalls mentioned in that video are resolved with a cordless saw.
Jr. Member
Jan 11, 2017
142 posts
67 upvotes
Great saw, average price as it goes for $100 once and a while. Lefty saws are fine if put the effort into using them left handed.
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
4423 posts
1679 upvotes
WFH
Josecc wrote: He's looking over the tool to see his cut.if it was reversed he wouldn't need to. If you were a right handed tradesperson that uses a saw everyday, you'd understand better. If you use your left hand to cut with this, then you don't need to look over the tool to see your cut, hence left handed.
if you use your left hand to drive this saw you're going to have to cross your arms to hold the side handle on the left of the saw with your right hand. Kind of awkward, hence right handed!
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 1, 2005
5886 posts
3559 upvotes
Toronto
Josecc wrote: I love makita to death, but buying a corded saw, especially a left handed one, not for me in this day and age.
zoso454 wrote: that looks like a right handed saw to me.
Josecc wrote: He's looking over the tool to see his cut.if it was reversed he wouldn't need to. If you were a right handed tradesperson that uses a saw everyday, you'd understand better. If you use your left hand to cut with this, then you don't need to look over the tool to see your cut, hence left handed.
It's because "handed saws" are incorrect, you should be calling them left/right sided blade saws to not confuse newbies.
blueangel2323 wrote: Cordless circular saws are much safer, especially for beginners. Yes they cost more but it's worth the investment.

With corded tools, when you release the trigger, the motor continues to spin with momentum, using friction to slow down and eventually stop. For something as fast as a circular saw, the blade can take several seconds to come to a complete stop, which can do a lot of damage if something goes wrong. Cordless tools have a brake that stops the motor immediately when you release the trigger.

Also, corded circular saws are so powerful that if the blade binds, it can kick back, causing you to lose control of the saw. With cordless, being much less powerful, the motor will just stall if the blade gets stuck. All you have to do is pull back a little until the motor spins back up again, and then keep going.

Plus, obviously there is no cord to step on, get caught, or accidentally cut. So, many of the pitfalls mentioned in that video are resolved with a cordless saw.
It's called an electronic brake and they are not exclusive to cordless circular saws.

Corded or cordless a saw is going to do damage.

If you're using a saw for 8+ hours a day a corded saw is much better as there is no need to change batteries and is lighter comparatively
dirtmover wrote:
if you use your left hand to drive this saw you're going to have to cross your arms to hold the side handle on the left of the saw with your right hand. Kind of awkward, hence right handed!
90% of the time people are going to use the saw with one hand, it's much easier to line up cuts with the blade on the left side for a right handed person.
:arrowd: B/S/T Threads :arrowd:
[FS] N/A
[WTB] N/A
Newbie
May 11, 2018
4 posts
2 upvotes
BeaverLiquor wrote:
It's called an electronic brake and they are not exclusive to cordless circular saws.
Does this saw have the brake?

I need a more powerful saw than my smaller dewalt cordless as l will be tackling a deck next year. I’ve been looking at this one but didn’t consider the safety aspect…
Member
Jun 27, 2018
256 posts
220 upvotes
I have one. It is a work horse. Good price now
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 1, 2005
5886 posts
3559 upvotes
Toronto
unwashedlederhosen wrote: Does this saw have the brake?

I need a more powerful saw than my smaller dewalt cordless as l will be tackling a deck next year. I’ve been looking at this one but didn’t consider the safety aspect…
The model in the OP does not appear to have an electric brake, if you want a corded saw with a brake this seems to be the next cheapest option after a quick search, https://www.amazon.ca/DEWALT-DWE575SB-L ... NrPXRydWU=

If you have a battery system you may want to get a cordless, if you're willing to spend more.

For decks that mean you could be working with wet lumber I prefer wormdrives but not everyone is comfortable using them.
:arrowd: B/S/T Threads :arrowd:
[FS] N/A
[WTB] N/A
Newbie
May 22, 2017
43 posts
35 upvotes
Strandednomad wrote: Going to buy my first saw, where can I learn saw safety as a newbie
Check out this video:



He's using a heavy duty worm-drive saw but the basics are still the same as for the side-winder style saw in the OP.
Deal Addict
Nov 12, 2006
2304 posts
1315 upvotes
London
Josecc wrote: He's looking over the tool to see his cut.if it was reversed he wouldn't need to.
I own this saw (or at least the non-LED predecessor 5007NB).
Purchased in 1992, and it has seen a lot of use.
No issues with it.

There is no need to look over as you suggest.
In that photo, the piece he is cutting to size is under his left hand.
The right hand, suspended piece is discard.
There is a gap between the left hand handle and the left side of the blade to view and follow his line.
That is the side that is important.
You really have little interest in the right hand side of the blade.

The notch/cutout on the base aligns with the motor side of the blade.
It is intended to help with following a line, on the left hand side of the blade.

He may be wanting to keep the other end, but you can't blame the saw if he does it backwards.
It's hard to have it both ways.
Newbie
May 22, 2017
43 posts
35 upvotes
arisk wrote: I own this saw (or at least the non-LED predecessor 5007NB).
Purchased in 1992, and it has seen a lot of use.
No issues with it.
I have the 5007NB also, purchased about a year ago. I've seen other 5007 models from the 90's and I'm pretty sure the design hasn't changed at all. My 1-year old saw doesn't even have a safety trigger, which I found surprising.

I also have a Mastercraft circular saw, purchased in 2013. Both saws all have the same capabilities, but the Makita is easier to adjust and feels more solid in your hands. The blade guard lever on the Mastercraft is a tiny piece of plastic that's difficult to hold with your thumb when starting a cut. The Makita has a metal lever that's easy to use. Similar story for the depth and bevel adjustment - Mastercraft uses crappy little plastic things that sometimes come loose and the Makita uses heavier metal/plastic ones.

That said, the Mastercraft one is still a tank and has seen lots of use. I use it only for concrete now and it refuses to die. I've cut hundreds of concrete pavers with it for my walkways and patio. I thought the concrete dust and slurry would have ruined the bearings by now but somehow it just keeps going.
Jr. Member
User avatar
Dec 20, 2012
188 posts
89 upvotes
Brampton
Strandednomad wrote: Going to buy my first saw, where can I learn saw safety as a newbie
- Always wear proper fitting safety glasses (buy them when you're picking up the saw)
- Never be in rush, last thing you want is to cut the cord or worse, your finger

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