Parenting & Family

Home School Curriculum for Ontario - SK & Elementary?

[OP]
Deal Expert
Oct 6, 2005
16588 posts
2298 upvotes

Home School Curriculum for Ontario - SK & Elementary?

Has anyone purchased a home school curriculum recently, especially in light of the lock downs? We're looking for a full program that will provide the parents with a daily set of lesson plans and activities for kids.

I'm not sure how online learning will be in September so we're preparing.

Any suggestions?
9 replies
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
3331 posts
1156 upvotes
Woodbridge
Hey @coolspot, I saw your post in that thread linked above. I was curious to see if others had any resources for you as I haven’t personally come across what you’re describing. One thing you could try is to look at teacherspayteachers.com. There’s a lot of stuff there for all grades and subjects. Much is free, but for higher quality comprehensive units you’re going to have to pay.
[OP]
Deal Expert
Oct 6, 2005
16588 posts
2298 upvotes
That's mostly bits and bobs, not a full day-to-day schedule. I'm looking for a whole home schooling program that I can provide the grandparents to help with teaching the kids.
OntEdTchr wrote: Hey @coolspot, I saw your post in that thread linked above. I was curious to see if others had any resources for you as I haven’t personally come across what you’re describing. One thing you could try is to look at teacherspayteachers.com. There’s a lot of stuff there for all grades and subjects. Much is free, but for higher quality comprehensive units you’re going to have to pay.
I saw there were a couple packages on there - but they were built for theb initial shutdown earlier in the year.

I guess few people have decided to invest in a full home schooling cirriculum, there's so many of them out there, not sure how the quality of each of those packages are. Most are offered by specialised companies with few opportunites to review the material too.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
3331 posts
1156 upvotes
Woodbridge
coolspot wrote: That's mostly bits and bobs, not a full day-to-day schedule. I'm looking for a whole home schooling program that I can provide the grandparents to help with teaching the kids.



I saw there were a couple packages on there - but they were built for theb initial shutdown earlier in the year.

I guess few people have decided to invest in a full home schooling cirriculum, there's so many of them out there, not sure how the quality of each of those packages are. Most are offered by specialised companies with few opportunites to review the material too.
What grade(s) are you looking for?

Are you planning on exclusively homeschooling or do you want to supplement the online learning offered by your school board? I know that many parents were less than impressed with the quality of the distance learning at the end of the last school year but things should be a lot different now. Why not wait and see what you get from the school board and then look for specific materials to fill whatever gaps there may be?
Sr. Member
Jan 8, 2011
502 posts
122 upvotes
London
If you plan on keeping your child enrolled in school, they will have to participate in the remote learning plan laid out by your school board. This will look much different than last year's stop gap and will take a considerable amount of time/commitment to complete at home. Students will be expected to attend synchronous learning sessions and complete/submit tasks and assignments. The expectation would be that between lessons, class meetings, and assignments, students are engaged in learning for 300 minutes a day (the same as in-class). Depending on your child, you may still be able to supplement this program with extras, but you likely wouldn't be able to follow a full homeschooling program and participate in your board's remote learning plan at the same time.

If you choose to withdraw them completely from the public school system, then you would be homeschooling and would be able to do your own thing. If you have Facebook, I would recommend looking there for groups dedicated to supporting parents with homeschooling. You'd probably get some good recommendations for full homeschooling programs from people in those groups. This also looks like a good website with lots of information about homeschooling: https://ontariohomeschool.org/
[OP]
Deal Expert
Oct 6, 2005
16588 posts
2298 upvotes
OntEdTchr wrote: What grade(s) are you looking for?

Are you planning on exclusively homeschooling or do you want to supplement the online learning offered by your school board? I know that many parents were less than impressed with the quality of the distance learning at the end of the last school year but things should be a lot different now. Why not wait and see what you get from the school board and then look for specific materials to fill whatever gaps there may be?
I'm looking for Grade 4 and SK material.

Yes, last year's remote learning wasn't very good so I'm preparing for the possibility it'll be the same in September. I would like to have materials on had so that if online learning is not good, we'll have a cirriculum we can switch over immediately. Even if we don't end up using it, it'll probably come in handy as supplementary material.

If online learning turns out to be choatic again, I can see a lot of parents clamouring for material, so I don't want to be stuck with nothing or books on back order for months.
sn02py wrote: If you plan on keeping your child enrolled in school, they will have to participate in the remote learning plan laid out by your school board. This will look much different than last year's stop gap and will take a considerable amount of time/commitment to complete at home. Students will be expected to attend synchronous learning sessions and complete/submit tasks and assignments. The expectation would be that between lessons, class meetings, and assignments, students are engaged in learning for 300 minutes a day (the same as in-class).
I don't have much faith they'll get their act together in September so I'm preparing a backup plan Smiling Face With Open Mouth

I'm also somewhat doubtful that online will be effective for Senior Kindergarten.
Member
Jul 7, 2020
284 posts
123 upvotes
Ottawa
I'm a teacher and I have two recommendations for elementary programs, one of which is completely free. First, the free one is called "Core Knowledge" and was developed by a famous intellectual named E.D. Hirsch. It has been used with great success in some American states including Massachusetts. All of the documents, plans, and readers for each grade level can be downloaded at: https://www.coreknowledge.org/curriculu ... urriculum/

My other recommendation is to use "Direct Instruction" programs for each subject. An overview of the various programs can be found at: https://www.nifdi.org/

These are all US-based, so if you are planning on teaching Canadian-specific content for social studies then you will have to find something else on your own. These other programs are ideal for Language, math, science, and most social studies topics (some might be too US-centric, so just ignore those ones).

One last recommendation is "Saxon Math" for mathematics, but I don't have first-hand experience with it.

For an SK student, I would recommend a book called "Teach your child to read in 100 easy lessons" for phonics and literacy instruction.

Edit: I noticed that there is also pre-school and kindergarten content available in the Core Knowledge program, so that is also a good option for SK.
Jr. Member
Jan 11, 2017
117 posts
52 upvotes
We grabbed those complete Canadian curriculum books for our kids in March because we figured they wouldn't go back. They were great filler, touched on some subjects that were harder to make up assignments for them. And we had a ton of the dollar store writing, math, shapes, etc books.

Grab an account for Raz kids or similar program for reading.

Make up your own math pages, work with money, play games with money involved, create a store.

Science is fairly easy to come up with fun stuff.

Themes important and you would be amazed how many subjects you can mix into any theme to make it fun. An Inukshuk can be math, history, science, fine motor skills, art, anything, and most of all fun.

Honestly with the amount of one on one help they get it's easy to get them ahead of their peers while they are at home in very little time. Just be realistic about it, progress at their pace and be able to read their mood. If they are getting cabin fever then go do something else, or use incentives. I taught my 6 year old how to do multiplication at supper one night in her head before she's even seen an equation. It's not about a 9-4 school day, it's not about unschooling, it's about being friends with your kids and working through things together in which ever way works for you.

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