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[Home Depot] Single outlet surge suppressor with alarm (for appliances) - $6.97

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  • Jun 22nd, 2016 2:37 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jan 5, 2003
4328 posts
3774 upvotes
Toronto

[Home Depot] Single outlet surge suppressor with alarm (for appliances) - $6.97

Home Depot has a Defiant brand single outlet surge suppressor with alarm on sale for $6.97.

https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.sing ... 52742.html

Surge suppressors are a must with appliances nowadays because of their electronics. Having a motherboard die is a common failure with major appliances, so a surge suppressor may help, just as you probably have one protecting your computers, TVs and other electronics. $7 is cheap insurance compared to a $300 repair bill to replace a fridge motherboard.

A surge suppressor can only absorb a certain amount of surges before it will no longer work (the Joule rating) and all of them have lights to indicate that they are no longer working. However, you can't see those lights if the outlet is behind a fridge, built in microwave, freezer, washer, gas dryer, etc. which is why one with an alarm (which sounds once it can no longer protect and you have to replace it) is perfect for appliances where the outlet is essentially hidden. Comparable ones at other hardware stores are about twice the price.

This one (and others similar to it) cover both outlets, so it's best for outlets where you usually only have one appliance plugged into it.

EDIT: forgot to mention that I saw another Defiant one with six outlet protection and alarm on sale for $8.97, so just $2 more if you need to plug in more than one appliance. Can't find it on the website, though.
6 replies
Sr. Member
Aug 21, 2011
849 posts
229 upvotes
Surge protectors are good but dont get yourself sucked into a false sense of security. Like a condom any protection is a good thing but its by no means a guarantee protecting your hardware.
http://www.cnet.com/news/9-things-you-s ... rotectors/
They might say $50,000 of protection but good luck ever claiming a penny.
Member
Jul 6, 2009
364 posts
83 upvotes
jm1 wrote: A surge suppressor can only absorb a certain amount of surges before it will no longer work (the Joule rating) and all of them have lights to indicate that they are no longer working.
View those spec numbers. That protector will absorb 333 joules and no more than 667 joules. A surge that tiny is often converted by electronics into rock stable, low DC voltages to safely power its semiconductors. So what is that near zero protector doing when an appliance already protects itself?

Effective protection is always about where hundreds of thousands of joules dissipate. No plug-in protector claims to protect from that type of surge. But a properly earthed 'whole house' solution does.

Once a surge is inside, then it goes hunting for earth destructively via appliances. Nothing can avert that hunt. Especially not a tiny protector; only hundreds of joules. Something completely different, a 'whole house' solution, does not even try to 'block' or 'absorb' a surge. Because it has a low impedance (ie less than 3 meter) connection to single point earth ground, then that current connects to earth without going inside.

Protection is always about connecting a surge to earth on a path that is not destructive. Plug-in protectors will not even discuss this.

One typically destructive surge is a direct lightning strike. Lightning is typically 20,000 amps. So a minimal 'whole house' protector is 50,000 amps. Unlike a plug-in protector, an effective solution even claims and does protection from direct lightning strikes. Never ignore numbers.

That Defiant protector must be protected by a 'whole house' solution. Best solution costs about $1 per protected appliance. And has the one item always required for effective protection - a low impedance (ie hardwire with no sharp bends) connection to single point earth ground. Protection is always about where hundreds of thousands of joules harmlessly dissipate - outside. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground - which that plug-in protector does not have and will not discuss.
Deal Addict
Mar 7, 2011
3655 posts
1842 upvotes
Vancouver
westom wrote: A protector is only as effective as its earth ground - which that plug-in protector does not have and will not discuss.
Nice copy/paste. Btw, I have yet to see a surge suppressor without a ground. And yes, this has one.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 13, 2008
3287 posts
3857 upvotes
Oakville
charlesd79 wrote: Nice copy/paste. Btw, I have yet to see a surge suppressor without a ground. And yes, this has one.
you probably didnt study physics or electronics.

The dude above is trying to explain you need a big enough bandwidth to allow for such high amount of amps to travel to ground.

sending 20,000amps through a tiny ground plug isnt going to protect anything as the rest will go elsewhere to find the quickest/shortest path to ground.

Anyway, it's all bullshit, the chance of your house being hit directly by lightening is next to nothing. It happens, but not as often as you think.

A solution to ground the entire house with material and labour would run you $5,000

Even if you blew two appliances, you would not justify the above cost.

Just buy the OP plug for a warm fuzzy feeling and hope karma doesnt come to fVck your appliances.
-ZdpZ... ;)
Member
Jul 6, 2009
364 posts
83 upvotes
charlesd79 wrote: Nice copy/paste. Btw, I have yet to see a surge suppressor without a ground. And yes, this has one.
You have never seen a plug-in protector with an earth ground. Please read with sufficient care. That means ignoring lies and hearsay. Every plug-in protector has a safety ground (as required for human protection) that does not protect appliances. Safety ground obviously is not earth ground. A critical term was ignored by reading superficially - low impedance.

Potentially destructive surges are rare - maybe once every seven years. Significantly less in your venue. Why spend massively on obscenely profitable plug-in protectors? To protect from something that rarely exists using something that does not even claim to protect from that rare surge?

Your protector can even make appliance damage easier. Fear, rather than facts, easily manipulates consumers who only learn from soundbytes, wild speculation, and fear. Most only believe a first 'subjective' claim (ie hearsay and advertising). OP and you both even ignored spec numbers.

If anything needs protection, then everything needs that protection. What protects your furnace, dishwasher, GFCIs, clocks, LED and CFL bulbs, air conditioner, TV, refrigerator, and the item that most needs protection during a surge - smoke detectors. After spending many times more money, those appliances remain unprotected. All those are protected by a proven soluton that costs about $1 per protected appliance. Not a rhetorical question. Question expects an answer based in facts and specification numbers. Why did you spend so much money for near zero protection?

zdpz also misunderstood protection parameters. he would have you spend $5000 for safety grounds. Best protection was even defined by a number (less than 3 meter connection). A 3 meter connection does not cost $5000. Again, read with care. That means one must unlearn urban myths that promoted expensive plug-in protectors.

Never ignore relevant numbers such as hundreds of thousands of joules, 50,000 amps, less than 3 meters, and $1 per protected appliance. A surge too tiny to damage any appliance may destroy that plug-in protector. If it was an APC protector now in a recall (involving maybe 15 million protectors), then fire is why it must be removed immediately. Plug-in protectors do not protect from a surge that typically causes appliance damage. Sometimes can even make appliance damage easier.

Your protector does not protect appliances. It probably protected profit margins. You probably made the OP's mistake - ignored relevant numbers such as 333 and 667 (near zero) joules. You even ignored a number that defines earth ground - ie less than 3 meters.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
27311 posts
13015 upvotes
I'm more curious as to what the alarm does.

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