Automotive

Honda Sedan vs SUV which is safer and easier to drive?

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  • Sep 2nd, 2019 10:42 am
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[OP]
Jr. Member
Jul 28, 2012
185 posts
39 upvotes

Honda Sedan vs SUV which is safer and easier to drive?

My dad's civic just past 200k and has been giving us a lot of issues.

He's in his late 60s and has driven civics his whole life but is interested in getting a Honda CRV.

He's not the best driver so my concern is which would be easier for him to drive? I'm guessing another civic given he's never driven SUVs before but not sure if the learning curve is that big.

Also which would be safer? I've heard SUVs are overall safer in an accident but just more likely to topple over.

Any insights would be greatly appreciated = )
37 replies
Sr. Member
Sep 25, 2018
844 posts
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It's just a car, not an aircraft carrier, plus your dad has been driven for decades. He may need some time to figure out all the new electronics added to the car, but driving an SUV is not that much different from driving a sedan.

Comparing to a sedan, an SUV will be bigger, has larger turning radius, and sits the driver higher.
Deal Addict
Jan 1, 2013
1839 posts
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Durham
CRV is a Compact SUV, not a Chevy Suburban. He won't topple over. Overall as he is getting older, I think the CRV would be best for him being higher up to see the road.
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Feb 11, 2007
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aspen300 wrote: My dad's civic just past 200k and has been giving us a lot of issues.

He's in his late 60s and has driven civics his whole life but is interested in getting a Honda CRV.

He's not the best driver so my concern is which would be easier for him to drive? I'm guessing another civic given he's never driven SUVs before but not sure if the learning curve is that big.

Also which would be safer? I've heard SUVs are overall safer in an accident but just more likely to topple over.

Any insights would be greatly appreciated = )
Unless he's having trouble getting out of the Civic, go for that.
It'll be easier to see out the back, be cheaper to buy and maintain and cheaper on gas.

If you think he could use it, go for all of the safety stuff like BLIS, EBC, all around camera, etc.

Safety wise they're pretty much identical.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
Jr. Member
Dec 1, 2014
199 posts
174 upvotes
Burlington, ON
Also look at Honda HR-V. A lot of seniors like that SUV (a bit smaller than CR-V, plenty of cargo capacity, easy to get in/out, reliable, cheap on gas, etc..)
aspen300 wrote: My dad's civic just past 200k and has been giving us a lot of issues.

He's in his late 60s and has driven civics his whole life but is interested in getting a Honda CRV.

He's not the best driver so my concern is which would be easier for him to drive? I'm guessing another civic given he's never driven SUVs before but not sure if the learning curve is that big.

Also which would be safer? I've heard SUVs are overall safer in an accident but just more likely to topple over.

Any insights would be greatly appreciated = )
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jul 28, 2012
185 posts
39 upvotes
Wasn't even aware of this option. Thanks for the tip!! Appreciate it.
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Sep 1, 2004
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Is he technophobic? I hate seeing seniors getting into new vehicles with too much tech. Especially all these new safety tools that create more alarms then old people are used to and become counter productive.
Member
Feb 2, 2018
414 posts
385 upvotes
Montreal
CRV probably perform a bit better on impacts due to the higher beltlines -more chance that the impact hits metal instead of glass. CUVs do roll over easier, sedans have more chance of getting stuck underneath something.

Because of those high beltlines, CUVs have poorer visibility of objects low to the ground. For example lower cars in ones blindspot or rear. When I was shopping for compact CUVs, the CRV's rear windshield seemed short, and visibility poor. This affects safety as well.

I think your dad will appreciate the CRV for its better loading height and easier ingress, egress.
Deal Expert
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Apr 21, 2004
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Read up on the 1.5T oil dilution issue if he is getting the latest CRV

If he's not the best driver and has some convictions on the record, maybe you can check with insurance co. which is cheapest for him to drive.

edit:
also, the rear lights of the CRV looks like an old grandpa (eyebrows and all) to me :)
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Mar 21, 2013
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To compare crash safety, look at active safety features, then look at crash ratings but within the context of weight.

https://www.iihs.org/iihs/ratings/TSP-List

https://www.iihs.org/ratings

https://www.iihs.org/ratings/vehicle/ho ... sedan/2019

https://www.iihs.org/ratings/vehicle/ho ... r-suv/2019

When comparing two vehicles, check the weight of them. A heavier vehicle with the same ratings is generally safer even with the same rating, as vehicles are crash tested against themselves. However a vehicle with a longer hood and the same weight and same ratings is likely a bit safer in a frontal crash. The difference in safety with weight can be significant but is small with hood length since that is somewhat accounted for in the tests.

The civic weighs about 2,956lbs in top trim. The CR-V weighs 3,564lbs. This will make a significant difference but not a huge amount - though the Civic is light among vehicles. Bear in mind a lot of pickup trucks are 5000+lbs, and midsize SUVs tend to be 4000-4700lbs or so. But if you care only about safety it ultimately turns into an arms race that is bad for the environment, your pocket book and liveability.
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Xtrema wrote: Is he technophobic? I hate seeing seniors getting into new vehicles with too much tech. Especially all these new safety tools that create more alarms then old people are used to and become counter productive.
Really? There are several cases of seniors running over people due to age, reaction times and medication. I'd ideally want every senior citizen driving something with automatic emergency breaking and pedestrian detection. They can generally ignore the infotainment crap.
Sr. Member
Oct 21, 2006
699 posts
441 upvotes
is your father open to the idea of a Toyota Corolla? I have driven both and the Corolla seems to be easier to get in and out of. The seating position of a CRV maybe too high for somebody who is in his age group, depending on actual height.
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Blubbs wrote: Really? There are several cases of seniors running over people due to age, reaction times and medication. I'd ideally want every senior citizen driving something with automatic emergency breaking and pedestrian detection. They can generally ignore the infotainment crap.
I'm bias and only have my own folks (70s) as reference. They are technophobic. Refuse to use smart phone and tablets and hate apps on TVs.

Whenever false/real alert comes on the safety tools, they freak out and loses composure which may or may not help the situation.
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^ ^ as long as it is beige (before someone posts it).
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Jul 28, 2009
488 posts
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Perhaps go test drive. I would also suggest Subaru Forester and Crosstrek. Older people love it, especially the visibility. Lot of modern cars have really small windows and blind spots.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jul 28, 2012
185 posts
39 upvotes
Xtrema wrote: Is he technophobic? I hate seeing seniors getting into new vehicles with too much tech. Especially all these new safety tools that create more alarms then old people are used to and become counter productive.
Not a technophobe as much as he's not as great of a driver anymore. His reaction time isn't as good as it used to be and he's not as aware of his surroundings so if an SUV is harder for one to see their surroundings with or is more difficult to switch lanes/turn with then it wouldn't be the best option is what I'm thinking.
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Sep 1, 2004
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aspen300 wrote: Not a technophobe as much as he's not as great of a driver anymore. His reaction time isn't as good as it used to be and he's not as aware of his surroundings so if an SUV is harder for one to see their surroundings with or is more difficult to switch lanes/turn with then it wouldn't be the best option is what I'm thinking.
Yeah, late 60s and early 70s is probably a good time to talk about taking their license away and start looking at other accommodations that requires less driving. Some are good until 80 but some are not. My folks are ok but not what it used to be. I'm pretty sure the car they are in is their last.
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Mar 7, 2007
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My mom is law is 91 and she is still driving.

BTW, she drives better than most people on this board. Always signals before a lane change or turn, and always drives on the right (for slower vehicles).

Can you guess what car she has? A Honda Civic.

Anyway... Why would any senior buy an SUV? I just don't see the point. The price difference of a base Civic sedan vs. a CRV is $10,000

When I'm a senior (almost there), I will buy the Civic, and spent the $10,000 I saved in coke and hoe's
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By the time many of us are seniors self-driving cars will be ubiquitous, which will provide substantial upgrades in quality of life and independence for anyone with a disability.

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