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How can I level this?

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  • May 23rd, 2021 11:35 am
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[OP]
Deal Addict
Apr 18, 2012
1491 posts
222 upvotes

How can I level this?

So guys I’m putting some gym equipment down in my garage. Now, my garage isn’t levelled, it slopes down slightly then back up again.

I know I can stick bunch of sticks or wood pieces to level this, but I was wondering if there is any professional product out there to level stuff. Like proper wedges with heigh adjustments and sfuff.

I’m gonna need to raise it by inch and half to level it
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12 replies
Newbie
Mar 13, 2006
94 posts
61 upvotes
If that's a squat rack, whatever you shim with should really be bolted down through to the floor, IMO.

Unless you're going for a professional look, I'd personally just use some cedar shims.. You can get a stack for like $6 at HD. If it will be heavy weight bearing, perhaps a wider shim would be appropriate (also sold at HD, but I forget their intended purpose).
[OP]
Deal Addict
Apr 18, 2012
1491 posts
222 upvotes
jayess wrote: If that's a squat rack, whatever you shim with should really be bolted down through to the floor, IMO.

Unless you're going for a professional look, I'd personally just use some cedar shims.. You can get a stack for like $6 at HD. If it will be heavy weight bearing, perhaps a wider shim would be appropriate (also sold at HD, but I forget their intended purpose).
Yes it is a bench press/ squat rack. I’m only gonna put weight there in the bar when I’m using it and resting between sets. Other than that, I’m not leaving weights on there.

So I guess shims are my only options huh
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
3703 posts
1235 upvotes
Edmonton
snipe2014 wrote: Yes it is a bench press/ squat rack. I’m only gonna put weight there in the bar when I’m using it and resting between sets. Other than that, I’m not leaving weights on there.

So I guess shims are my only options huh
You want the professional way?
Same way we install million dollar plus machinery and get it level to within 0.001" (or whatever specs are required)?

There are usually 2 specs, a specs for the base and a specs for the machine.
Specs for base are usually within 1/4" or so .

First we shoot it with a survey. And get it low. Let's say you need to go up 1.65" or so,
We put 1/2" plate onto the concrete on the corners. We survey it again over many areas to make sure we are happy with it, if it's sagging in the middle we need to raise it up in that area. Then drill holes into it and mark on the concrete then take off the base and use hilti ice and glue them in. Drill holes beside these shims into the concrete and out anchors in. Once the base is set we tighten up nuts attached to the anchors so the base is in.

Then for the machinery we have special shims, ranging from 0.001" all the way up and using dials or lasers (whatever QC asks for) we can get the machinery on there dead level.


For your basic use, I would use a machinist level and would stack up shims on one end until your happy with it, drill holes on 2 ends to anchor into concrete and then pack the middle as it slopes as best as you can.

Also use metal shims
warming up the earth 1 gas fill-up at a time...
You only live once, get a v8
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 14, 2010
1460 posts
896 upvotes
Barrie ON
If you met me you would know that I am not familiar with exercise equipment, so I don't know the size of this equipment.

Would it fit on 4x8 sheets of plywood? Plywood would span the imperfections in the floor and give an absolutely flat surface.

Although the surface would be flat, it will still have a slight slope towards the door if the floor was poured properly.

The plywood can be sold or reused for other things should you decide to give up exercising when the pandemic ends.
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
4309 posts
2208 upvotes
tmkf_patryk wrote: You want the professional way?
Same way we install million dollar plus machinery and get it level to within 0.001" (or whatever specs are required)?

There are usually 2 specs, a specs for the base and a specs for the machine.
Specs for base are usually within 1/4" or so .

First we shoot it with a survey. And get it low. Let's say you need to go up 1.65" or so,
We put 1/2" plate onto the concrete on the corners. We survey it again over many areas to make sure we are happy with it, if it's sagging in the middle we need to raise it up in that area. Then drill holes into it and mark on the concrete then take off the base and use hilti ice and glue them in. Drill holes beside these shims into the concrete and out anchors in. Once the base is set we tighten up nuts attached to the anchors so the base is in.

Then for the machinery we have special shims, ranging from 0.001" all the way up and using dials or lasers (whatever QC asks for) we can get the machinery on there dead level.


For your basic use, I would use a machinist level and would stack up shims on one end until your happy with it, drill holes on 2 ends to anchor into concrete and then pack the middle as it slopes as best as you can.

Also use metal shims
Wouldn't be a little simpler to pour some self leveling floor compound in the area they're using?
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
3703 posts
1235 upvotes
Edmonton
pootza wrote: Wouldn't be a little simpler to pour some self leveling floor compound in the area they're using?
Pretty sure self levelling compound doesn't work well at thicker levels. Not to mention alot of sloped floors for draining of fluids (gland water for pumps running different fluids inside, or just water itself as it's a water recycle pump)
warming up the earth 1 gas fill-up at a time...
You only live once, get a v8
Deal Addict
Apr 26, 2003
1759 posts
843 upvotes
GTA
I wouldn't use cedar shims, they'd get crushed and splinter under weight. If anything, use hardwood like oak. There's no other flat spots in the garage for this? Since you say you're not leaving weight on it, the simplest thing to do is to move it to a flat spot when you're using it and then back when you're storing it.

Another option is to use rubber shims like these: https://www.archiproducts.com/en/produc ... ims_188365
Deal Guru
User avatar
Sep 1, 2005
14293 posts
9059 upvotes
Markham
Sometimes it's easier to just google exactly what you're asking for.

What you do might depend what kind of lifting you're doing, budget, how much work you want to do, how permanent you want it to be etc. Cheapest and easiest is to just move the equipment to a more level area - does it have to be against the wall there?

FYI Plywood is not cheap right now [a 4x8 sheet of 3/4" plywood is $60-$100 each] but then again I don't know your budget or lack thereof.

https://www.google.com/search?q=levelli ... e&ie=UTF-8

We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
[OP]
Deal Addict
Apr 18, 2012
1491 posts
222 upvotes
Thanks for all the replies. Unfortunately it has to be in that location.

I am getting my garage floors done with polyaspartic. Which is why I want to keep it looking as clean as possible. I don’t want to put plywood sheet and whatnot. The best thing it seems like I’ll use some rubber shims or those bolt on levelling feet. I assume I have to screw them to the side of the legs Snd then level it. Hopefully it can hold the weight.

I feel like the safer bet is to use some rubber shims as I’m afraid the bolt on just might give up on me

Because the metal leg is hollow inside, so when I screw it in, it’s not really screwed into anything.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 5, 2006
6016 posts
248 upvotes
Murica
Would self leveling concrete work?

As it’s planned for gym purpose, if you drop weights or bang on it will it chip off even if you have rubber mats?
Deal Fanatic
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Oct 19, 2008
6880 posts
2446 upvotes
GTA
1.5" drop over what looks like 18" length of the base is huge! Pull the stand a bit further away from the wall if thats where you will be using it, put a level on uprights and get exact measurement-hopefully its less than 1.5". There are square steel wedge washers available, thinking 1 on the floor and then a regular square washer on top of that would fill the gap if its actually 1" and washers are 1/2"
I would try a cheap way first, get a piece of hardwood. Use a mitre saw and cut a wedge the length of the gap under the base, say 1.5" height going to nothing at 16". PL that to bottom of each base leg, it might hold up if full contact with floor and base leg....if its rocking around as you work out it will crumble away.

I like wood wedge as the steel is fully supported and mobile, even better (more expensive) would be high density plastic in that wedge shape. Using washers just at the base ends to keep it 1.5" off the ground (level) might cause the steel base to curve over time, its likely 1/6 square tubing.

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