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How to compare BTU and Watt for gas and electric stove

  • Last Updated:
  • May 22nd, 2019 8:39 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
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Jul 4, 2006
3202 posts
524 upvotes

How to compare BTU and Watt for gas and electric stove

Hi,

I'm looking at two similar GE slide in double ovens. The single fuel gas stove/oven and the electric have 21,000 btu and 3,000 watts respectively for their max burners. There is a $900 premium for the gas stove.

A raw conversion suggests that the gas is 6154 watts.

This site notes that "With gas cooking much of the heat is wasted away off the sides of the pan. Because of this gas is 60% efficient, meaning that you may be losing up to 40% of the heat." This suggests that the gas stove is actually only the equivalent of 3,692 watts.

Has that been everyone else's experience as well?

I'm trying to determine if the gas stove is worth the premium.
5 replies
Jr. Member
Apr 3, 2018
157 posts
103 upvotes
A 30,000btu gas burner boil 1L of water in 4 min, while a 2700w electric burner takes 3 min (if I remember correct). Just for your reference.
Jr. Member
Feb 28, 2018
119 posts
81 upvotes
Waterloo region
more control with gas... all the big name chefs use gas ( if that's any indication )..
Deal Addict
Jan 5, 2003
3894 posts
3071 upvotes
Toronto
Some things to consider:

1. If you don't already have a gas line, factor installation of a gas line ($200+) into the premium.
2. If you already have gas, then factor installation of a 240V line for electric (assuming you only have a 120V line to the range now).
3. Gas has better control (useful for low heat, simmering, sauces, etc.) and generally higher heat, but you have to factor in the type of cooking you do and the type of chef you are.
4. Gas can be used when the power is out due to an ice storm, etc.
5. If oven is turned on for a three hour roast, gas would cost less than electricity (in Ontario, at least). But it's unlikely you would ever make up the premium based on fuel savings alone.

If you are replacing a range with electric burners and haven't felt that heat was previously lacking when cooking, then stick with electric and save $1,000+
[OP]
Deal Addict
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Jul 4, 2006
3202 posts
524 upvotes
My builder has a gas line + 120v penciled in. So I'd have to make a change to go to dual fuel (at least to have the option) or switch entirely to 220v.

I understand that there's more control on a gas stove but I didnt realize how much more expensive a gas range would be than electric.

Tbh, I've never found my electric stove in my condo to be lacking given my culinary skillset. If anything, my issue is with my fan hood bc my condo gets smelly if I sear a steak nicely.

I'd like to try cooking with a wok.. but I posted bc I'm having a hard time figuring out which gets hotter. If the gas model gets 2x hotter, then I could understand the argument for it.
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2007
2137 posts
1450 upvotes
SW Ontario
poorwingman wrote:
May 22nd, 2019 9:07 am
I'm trying to determine if the gas stove is worth the premium.
Absolutely hands down.

Compare your energy costs, and you'll find gas is much much cheaper to operate.

Gas stoves generally tend to last longer as well.

Not to mention you still can use the burners when the power is out.

Once you go gas, you'll never go back to electric.
I'd rather be outdoors camping, kayaking, and mountain biking ...

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