Home & Garden

How does sunroom affect home insurance and property taxes ?

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  • Sep 1st, 2021 3:12 pm
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
9686 posts
1143 upvotes

How does sunroom affect home insurance and property taxes ?

I am not sure about the impact of property taxes. But when I call my insurance company, they said there is no change.

Does anyone else have different experience ?

By the way, I remember some contractors say keeping/removing the patio doors to the sunroom will affect the property tax too, not sure the detail though.

https://www.nvskitchenbath.com/sunroom- ... rty-taxes/
9 replies
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
1993 posts
1723 upvotes
GTA
I can't recall, but was your planning for a four season sunroom?

Generally speaking, if its finished space, and via the building permit, it will increase the assessed value of your house, which is one of the factors that property tax is based on. So in all likelyhood there will be a minor increase to your property taxes.

In regards to insurance, if it is covered, it should cause an increase to your insurance, however is your full coverage to rebuild etc was $1.2mil before and remains at that, and all your other coverage remains the same, it could stay the same. Just seems like more risk of things being damaged, so should also seem like a slight increase is in order. It will really depend on who you have insurance with, and how their calculations work.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
9686 posts
1143 upvotes
I would also assume increase in living space would increase property tax. But I don't understand why keeping/removing the patio doors would make a difference. The city also asked specifically if the room is heated. Not sure why there would be a difference though. It is like 3 seasons would be different than 4 season.
SubjectivelyObjective wrote: I can't recall, but was your planning for a four season sunroom?

Generally speaking, if its finished space, and via the building permit, it will increase the assessed value of your house, which is one of the factors that property tax is based on. So in all likelyhood there will be a minor increase to your property taxes.

In regards to insurance, if it is covered, it should cause an increase to your insurance, however is your full coverage to rebuild etc was $1.2mil before and remains at that, and all your other coverage remains the same, it could stay the same. Just seems like more risk of things being damaged, so should also seem like a slight increase is in order. It will really depend on who you have insurance with, and how their calculations work.
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
22774 posts
21609 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
rdx wrote: I would also assume increase in living space would increase property tax. But I don't understand why keeping/removing the patio doors would make a difference. The city also asked specifically if the room is heated. Not sure why there would be a difference though. It is like 3 seasons would be different than 4 season.
I think it’s because of the difference between being seasonal and being a year round usable space
Seasonal … it might be defined as a sunroom, or screened porch
That’s quite different from something useable year round that has a proper foundation, roof (vs overhang), insulation, and heating

As to the Patio Door Question …

Again I think that feeds into the definition

If no patio door between the 2 spaces … then it’s definitely a home addition
Patio door etc … it’s a seasonal space / porch

Also security … patio doors would be IMO far more secure than no door at all between the two spaces
Or the cheap doors many people have on their screened porches, sun rooms, etc
Member
Feb 29, 2008
361 posts
153 upvotes
GTA
My parents added sun room to their house almost 15 years ago, ended up extending the basement as well to add another set of stairs to go down and added another room below the area where sun room was added. Property tax went up quite a bit
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
1993 posts
1723 upvotes
GTA
rdx wrote: But I don't understand why keeping/removing the patio doors would make a difference. The city also asked specifically if the room is heated. Not sure why there would be a difference though. It is like 3 seasons would be different than 4 season.
This is likely the distinction your municipality makes in regards to what is counted as interior finished space.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
9686 posts
1143 upvotes
fuzzy2k3 wrote: My parents added sun room to their house almost 15 years ago, ended up extending the basement as well to add another set of stairs to go down and added another room below the area where sun room was added. Property tax went up quite a bit
Why do they need to add stairs to go below ? The added basement is not connected to the existing basement ?

By the way, I was thinking about going down to basement level, but the additional cost the contractor quoted me doesn't make sense. He said it would be minimum of another $70K+ additional. And my basement is already finished, not sure how much damage/work will be required to connect the new and old basement.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
9686 posts
1143 upvotes
SubjectivelyObjective wrote: This is likely the distinction your municipality makes in regards to what is counted as interior finished space.
Maybe, probably if the room is heated and not separate by a patio door, they would consider that is finished additional living space.
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
1993 posts
1723 upvotes
GTA
rdx wrote: He said it would be minimum of another $70K+ additional. And my basement is already finished, not sure how much damage/work will be required to connect the new and old basement.
$70k seems way too high as a premium above either shallower footings or helical piles, assuming its a basically a one room footprint.

This said, depending on how you plan to connect it to the existing basement can open up a big can of worms. If you just want to have a doorway between the two then its a much more straight forward job, however if you want to take down the foundation wall to connect the two and make the basement open space larger, then this is where significant work is required, its complicated and very costly.

How does that $70k compare to the total project cost. I can't really recall, but I believe most people would say for an unfinished basement on an addition it was like $50-100/sqft premium vs helical piles. Granted, smaller sizes would come at more of a premium.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
9686 posts
1143 upvotes
SubjectivelyObjective wrote: $70k seems way too high as a premium above either shallower footings or helical piles, assuming its a basically a one room footprint.

This said, depending on how you plan to connect it to the existing basement can open up a big can of worms. If you just want to have a doorway between the two then its a much more straight forward job, however if you want to take down the foundation wall to connect the two and make the basement open space larger, then this is where significant work is required, its complicated and very costly.

How does that $70k compare to the total project cost. I can't really recall, but I believe most people would say for an unfinished basement on an addition it was like $50-100/sqft premium vs helical piles. Granted, smaller sizes would come at more of a premium.
90+% of those who built a sunroom didn't build on full foundation but pier foundation like Techno Post on video below. Type of foundation is only a portion of the additional costs between building full basement foundation and foundation on post. The cost difference for this foundation should be around $20-30K. But then, there will be insulation cost, HVAC cost connecting to the existing system (provided it can support the additional square footage. Otherwise, it will be additional cost to change the entire HVAC system).

Honestly, I do not know a single friend who owns a house with a sunroom. Don't even mention finding friends to get opinions between full foundation and pier foundation.




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