Food & Drink

How to fix wobbly cutting board

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  • Aug 18th, 2021 7:35 am
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Dec 4, 2010
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How to fix wobbly cutting board


I tried making it wet and putting a heavy item like a cast iron pot to weigh it down. Didn’t work.
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Jan 16, 2011
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do you have access to a wood shop or know someone who does? A quick pass thru a planer would fix that in a snap.
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Dec 3, 2009
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I always have a dish towel between my cutting board and counter to keep it from slipping. I'd think it'd help with wobbling too. Maybe even doubling up on towels if it's doesn't make a cushy surface for the board.
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kr0zet wrote: do you have access to a wood shop or know someone who does? A quick pass thru a planer would fix that in a snap.
No.

Guess I need to get a new one or just use a cloth like no frills said.
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Nov 15, 2008
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I use a piece of yoga mat material I picked up from Len's Mill Stores under things https://lensmill.com/ They mail order.

The benefit is it is plastic so you can easily clean it up if meat juices or the like run off. It is rubbery-grippy & padded so it can accommodate an uneven surface. I use one under my kettle so it does not vibrate like a rocket taking off when it boils. It cuts the noise. Also, under my computer for vibrational noise too.
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Dec 8, 2015
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I always use the HEAVY plastic ones because the wood boards always warp and it's annoying. The plastic ones last forever but I replace every 10 years anyway. They are not that cute looking in the kitchen tho. Bonus: they don't dull your knives as fast as wood.
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Dec 9, 2003
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Four little plastic feet - like the door bumpers they put in kitchen cabinets to make the doors close quietly
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Cough wrote: Four little plastic feet - like the door bumpers they put in kitchen cabinets to make the doors close quietly
This. Just screw four feet into the corners, the bend in the middle will be irrelevant then.
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Sep 27, 2008
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Leuven
Supercooled wrote: I tried making it wet and putting a heavy item like a cast iron pot to weigh it down. Didn’t work.
When you say you tried making it wet, what exactly did you do? That is a thick board and would require a long time soaking.

You could also try steaming the board for a couple hours, but from what I gather it has some risk of cracking the board.
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BongoBong wrote: When you say you tried making it wet, what exactly did you do? That is a thick board and would require a long time soaking.

You could also try steaming the board for a couple hours, but from what I gather it has some risk of cracking the board.
I never soaked it but I guess it would make sense given its thickness. I'll try the method again which was one of the more popular remedies for a warped board but honestly, the rubber feet idea is probably the quickest solution, clean and aesthetically pleasing of the ideas, apart from returning it back to the original state; wish I thought of it.

Steaming seems like a wasteful way to do it.

BTW, I got this during Ikea's Crazy Wednesdays promo a few years back; probably a decade ago? Was $5 from an original $15 or so.
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evilYoda wrote: was put in the dishwasher?
I usually just wash it and let it lay flat to dry. Sometimes, not always, I will wipe it dry as can be but the times neglected probably took its toll.
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Supercooled wrote: I never soaked it but I guess it would make sense given its thickness. I'll try the method again which was one of the more popular remedies for a warped board but honestly, the rubber feet idea is probably the quickest solution, clean and aesthetically pleasing of the ideas, apart from returning it back to the original state; wish I thought of it.

Steaming seems like a wasteful way to do it.

BTW, I got this during Ikea's Crazy Wednesdays promo a few years back; probably a decade ago? Was $5 from an original $15 or so.
Steaming does seem like a bit much, but soaking and putting weights on is about as easy a remedy as there is (if it works). Other benefit of making it flat is getting the actual cutting surface flatter as well.

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