Home & Garden

How good DIY can I do with this

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 8th, 2019 5:17 pm
Tags:
17 replies
Newbie
Dec 8, 2009
30 posts
22 upvotes
Edmonton
Battery charger not included?

This should be fine for most small projects. Corded saws have more power so will cut faster. I find that these cordless saws draw enough power that the batteries drain very fast and need to be constantly recharged. Even cycling through 2 batteries wasn't enough to keep up when I was using it for an extended period.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
13002 posts
9929 upvotes
Edmonton
You can see it's well reviewed, so I'm not sure what the question is (424 reviews with a 5* rating). It won't be the tool that limits the quality of your DIY work...

The only real concerns I'd have are:
a) It doesn't come with a charger, so you'd need to have one from another kit or purchased separately. It's a "Bare Tool" saw and a battery add-on.
b) It comes with a 2.0Ah battery, which is pretty small for a saw. If you want to work all day on a deck, you'd probably want a larger battery or a second battery so you can charge one while you're using the other. Especially since you'll probably want a Dewalt drill/driver, which will also be chewing up batteries.
c) Don't know about the quality of the blade it comes with. I use a Freud thin kerf blade in my corded PC circular saw. I've had it for years (like 15 years), and it still puts and AWESOME edge on anything I cut with it. But I'm just an average homeowner type, so it's not like it's getting used 8 hours every day.

C
Deal Addict
Dec 17, 2007
2619 posts
1594 upvotes
Alliston, ON
Quangbot wrote: Battery charger not included?

This should be fine for most small projects. Corded saws have more power so will cut faster. I find that these cordless saws draw enough power that the batteries drain very fast and need to be constantly recharged. Even cycling through 2 batteries wasn't enough to keep up when I was using it for an extended period.
Get a higher capacity battery and you won't notice a difference in power. You'll also get much longer run times between charge.
I love my Milwaukee 7 1/4" cordless saw with a 5ah battery. It's not to heavy and I never run low on battery before the spare battery is done charging

OP, if you're just using it for cutting 2x wood, then I'd pick up a cheap 7 1/4" mitre saw... There are some you can get for around the same price when on sale
Deal Expert
User avatar
Dec 26, 2005
16989 posts
1813 upvotes
Thornhill
I’d get a mitre saw. If you’re only going to have one circular saw, I’d go for corded. Circular saw with that tiny battery won’t last long.

bjl
What we do in life echoes in Eternity... and in Google cache.
RFD discounts for Schluter products
Deal Expert
May 30, 2005
47109 posts
7513 upvotes
Richmond Hill
t3359 wrote: I’d get a mitre saw. If you’re only going to have one circular saw, I’d go for corded. Circular saw with that tiny battery won’t last long.

bjl
Agreed, if a deck is what you want to build, then you want a mitre saw over a circular.

In my opinion battery saws are a niche product because you don’t get enough runtime out of them to work on a project. For that reason they’re mostly for quick and dirty fix and patch work where it wouldn’t be convenient to lug around a cord - best example would be a battery reciprocating saw for pruning trees. Sure you could get more batteries but you’d be constantly changing and charging that will kill the life of your batteries. I’ve seen videos of similar saws where they tested the runtime - in general you’re only getting about 100ft of material cut on a 2x4 before the battery dies.
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
11452 posts
6636 upvotes
Paris
t3359 wrote: I’d get a mitre saw. If you’re only going to have one circular saw, I’d go for corded. Circular saw with that tiny battery won’t last long.

bjl
100% if you are building a deck you need a 10” mitre Saw. I have literally every tool in the world and I rarely use my circular saws. Mitre Saw is the go to winner for so much.

I do use a circ Saw for breaking down sheets goods that are too big for my table saw, but those are rough cuts.
Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2006
12652 posts
7315 upvotes
Brampton
If you're thinking about building a deck or anything that requires some nice measured cuts I'd go Mitre and save some money towards a work/saw horse.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 19, 2008
7133 posts
2746 upvotes
GTA
Good advice on the mitre saw, more useful and safer for a newbie compared to a circular saw.

Often when a circular saw is required you will need more run time/power than a battery circ provides. I have the complete line of dewalt 20v, worklight-all saws to radio. Sold off the circular saw and bought the corded version. Building a deck for example, its nice to just let decking boards run wild on the outside-especially if laying boards on the diagonal. Snap a chalk line and use the circular saw....if the decking is 5/4 you might get half an average deck done. If the decking is wet 2x6's a battery circular will drain all your batteries for a 40 foot run.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
18698 posts
21374 upvotes
GTA
ratatapa wrote: https://www.amazon.ca/DEWALT-DCS391B-20 ... r=8-2&th=1

How strong is this saw? Is it good for 2x4 or 2x6 cutting, future Deck building and etc?

Trying to find a way to convince the GF into buying it lol
Buy a corded saw unless you really need the portability. For DIY corded will be less hassle, cheaper, and more powerful.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
Deal Addict
Jun 16, 2009
3460 posts
1880 upvotes
Woodbridge
I second below statement. OP you should also consider mitre saw that fits in your budget
https://www.lowes.ca/tools/power-tools/saws/mitre-saws/
engineered wrote: Buy a corded saw unless you really need the portability. For DIY corded will be less hassle, cheaper, and more powerful.
HVAC Pro-Committed to customer, not brand. Past RFD Reviews
2022 Central Air Conditioner & Furnace Group Buy
Member
User avatar
Sep 25, 2003
284 posts
78 upvotes
Scarborough
Cordless tools are great with not having to deal with a long extension cord, cords wrapping up in your work, or finding an outlet. But nothing more frustrating for a DIYer when you've realized that you forgot to charge your batteries, or you've run out of juice just hoping to make "one more cut."
Member
Jun 24, 2012
242 posts
160 upvotes
Hamilton
Despite what others have said 9 times out of 10 i grab my battery powered circular saw for most DIY jobs. You can do a lot of cuts with a circular saw and a straight edge or speed square. You definately need a second battery though or you'll get frustrated. At an average DIYer speed you usually won't run out of juice while alertnating batteries.

That being said for a big job like a deck or fence there are far more efficient tools, like a miter saw.

But if your only going to have one saw, I'd go circular because of its diversity, portability and cost.
Deal Expert
May 30, 2005
47109 posts
7513 upvotes
Richmond Hill
Richhy wrote: Despite what others have said 9 times out of 10 i grab my battery powered circular saw for most DIY jobs. You can do a lot of cuts with a circular saw and a straight edge or speed square. You definately need a second battery though or you'll get frustrated. At an average DIYer speed you usually won't run out of juice while alertnating batteries.

That being said for a big job like a deck or fence there are far more efficient tools, like a miter saw.

But if your only going to have one saw, I'd go circular because of its diversity, portability and cost.
Agreed, if one plans on only ever having one saw, it should be a circular. However, usually once you go down that path, you'll start buying other saws, and the circular saw will see the least use.
Member
Feb 26, 2017
266 posts
123 upvotes
I have both corded and cordless circular saws. Initially I only had a corded one. After I bought the cordless one 4-5 years ago, my corded one has been collecting dust in the corner.

The cordless one is so convenient. I can take it to any end of the wood or high on the ladder/platform to make the cut without dragging the line and also don't have to worry about tripping on the wire at the worksite.

I have set of cordless tools from drill, driver to saw using the same battery. So if a battery run low, I just use one from the other tool. I usually run out battery on my drill or driver before the saw.

Some tools that I need constant power from the cord such as hammer drill, impact gun for car suspension knuckle nuts or axle nuts, etc. So those tools I bought the corded ones.

Top

Thread Information

There is currently 1 user viewing this thread. (0 members and 1 guest)