Careers

How important is it to have a big title in your career?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 8th, 2016 7:12 pm
Tags:
None
[OP]
Penalty Box
User avatar
Feb 21, 2013
344 posts
41 upvotes
Yukon

How important is it to have a big title in your career?

as you progress in your career, is it important for you to have a bigger and bigger title? for example, is it important to have a manager title but your job is just that of an analyst? how about VP? I know a lot of companies give out big titles to employees but their salaries is just that of an analyst. what do you think? there are directors and VPs out there making only $80K but a programmer could be making $200k
19 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 16, 2007
3906 posts
1021 upvotes
Toronto
not at all, although in my careers, the "titles" directly affect and relate to pay and chain of command, and qualifications
Deal Addict
Nov 14, 2003
1056 posts
111 upvotes
Toronto
carmaster wrote: Titles mean nothing at the end of the day.
I would disagree. a proper title should reflect the work you are performing. If you are looking for a new job - the title plays a major role in the assumption that you have the skills to perform a similar job. Atleast, you could get a second look. Typically a title also provides a classification in an organization and a range for your salary.
Member
Oct 29, 2013
302 posts
55 upvotes
Important.

Most people will never make it to manager or management level.
Sr. Member
Jun 3, 2006
734 posts
138 upvotes
Markham
It's important enough to a point, but people can quickly cut through what you truly do and put you in the right job. I work for a US-based financial services company, and for some reason, companies seem to give many of their people VP titles. My external title is a VP, but the reality is that my job is director or Sr. manager level. At this point, I don't really care about the title. It's more about the specific responsibilities and the pay.
Member
Nov 19, 2011
292 posts
66 upvotes
Calgary
Personally I consider title some what important for two reasons.
1-people in your organization know we're you stand so people know who to bother for what.
2-when you look for another job title can help get people's attention. I'm hiring for a manager position and there are two people both did similar manager like jobs but only one was a real manager, I would consider the one with the title to have experience in a manager role rather then relevant experience.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
9646 posts
2061 upvotes
Edmonton
I'd like mine to be at least 48 font
Jr. Member
User avatar
May 14, 2016
113 posts
33 upvotes
Yeah it's pretty important - if you aren't progressing in your career, then that usually means that you're either:
1) Working for a low-budget company that can't afford to promote you and it's questionable why you stayed so long
2) You aren't excelling and the company doesn't want to promote you, so why would we want to hire you if your own company doesn't value you?

Although from what you're describing that they're still doing the same stuff as an analyst while being a "manager", the person will get screwed regardless. I would always want to ask more about the leadership "manager" role they have. If they can't answer a simple behavioural/situational question about leadership, I'd start poking holes in their "manager" title and they'd be cut pre quick. Not to mention the fact that if their resume already doesn't describe managerial duties, they wouldn't even get the interview cuz it'd be so easy to call the BS.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Dec 7, 2009
13849 posts
1337 upvotes
Big title usually means big responsibility. I don't want to have to be moving and shaking all day long, running around trying to appease people. While working with people is something I thrive off of, having to stay 'on' at all times is not something I've really excelled at.
In a perfect system, corporations would fear the government and the government would fear the people. - David Wong

Check out caRpetbomBer's picks in this thread.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 14, 2006
1212 posts
401 upvotes
GTA
It's relative although as I'm in banking, the corporate title isn't as important as the function title. E.g. corporate title could just be "finance manager", but functional title is "chief financial officer".

If anything, I'd say the employee pay grade or level is more important.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 26, 2007
1220 posts
317 upvotes
Nope, don't care because that would involve caring what people think.

Think there are people with big titles who do jack, and people with meager titles who work their tail's off.
Additionally, know people who are lower on the totem pole that can still pull in some big bucks (look at some Public Sector Union jobs on the Sunshine list)
Deal Addict
Feb 14, 2016
1754 posts
1176 upvotes
canadiancynosure wrote: Nope, don't care because that would involve caring what people think.

Think there are people with big titles who do jack, and people with meager titles who work their tales off.
Additionally, know people who are lower on the totem pole that can still pull in some big bucks (look at some Public Sector Union jobs on the Sunshine list)
lol TTC Token Collectors, making more money than manager levels at big 4 firms! :|
or cops who make more money than senior military officer :(
Sr. Member
Mar 30, 2011
541 posts
142 upvotes
North York
Has anyone asked for a title change during job negotiation? How did it go and was HR reluctant or were relatively lax?
Deal Fanatic
Sep 23, 2007
5061 posts
1158 upvotes
Just like having a nice resume, a nice title will help you land the interview. But if during the interview you can't answer questions at the expected level, it's a waste of time for everyone. It's not that difficult to weed out people who are inflating their titles in a job interview.

So a title is important in the sense that it should be a reflection of what you do. If you have a high level position, then your title should reflect that and it will help you with your job search. If you have an inflated title, it's kind of like lying to your date that you make 6 figures or that you drive a Ferrari when you actually drive a Corolla. It's just a matter of time before they figure it out and become disappointed.
Sr. Member
Nov 15, 2008
800 posts
221 upvotes
If having a big title is important for you, I don't want to work with you or under you because you are probably insufferable.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 28, 2007
1743 posts
121 upvotes
SW20 MR2 wrote: It's important enough to a point, but people can quickly cut through what you truly do and put you in the right job. I work for a US-based financial services company, and for some reason, companies seem to give many of their people VP titles. My external title is a VP, but the reality is that my job is director or Sr. manager level. At this point, I don't really care about the title. It's more about the specific responsibilities and the pay.
We must work for the same doofus U.S. bank, because I'm in the same boat (VP title, but responsibilities are more towards that of a Sr. Manager)

Anyway, to answer the question, the title is important to an extent. It's part of managing your career path. If your goal is to one day be a (legit) Director or VP, you'll have a hard time convincing HR and hiring managers if your resume only shows titles like Analyst or Senior Coordinator.

Several years ago, it was really important to me to cross the threshold of having the word "manager" in my job title.

I've done so (sort of) and now I'm not overly concerned about titles anymore as long as they don't revert me back to being/looking like an analyst.

I have more thoughts on the topic of job titles, but I don't think that they apply to what you're asking.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 28, 2007
1743 posts
121 upvotes
neverless wrote: Has anyone asked for a title change during job negotiation? How did it go and was HR reluctant or were relatively lax?
I think that it's not too uncommon nowadays to use a more "descriptive" title on your resume, but then come clean during your reference check.

Using myself as an example, I'm currently sending out resumes in search of a new job.

My current employer, as I mentioned in my previous post, issued me a title of VP which I find ridiculous. The alternative is a non-descriptive job title that's only useful when determining my job grade and says absolutely nothing about what I do.

So I've changed my job title on my resume so that it describes what I do while not making me seem larger/smaller than I am in terms of my position in the company.

When HR reps are going through 300+ resumes, you sometimes have to pull a few maneuvers to make sure you don't get lost in the crowd.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 6, 2010
9321 posts
1363 upvotes
Montreal, QC
Depends on the field.

In terms of career advancement, titles don't mean a whole lot because we're judged based on the portfolio of work so from the lowliest junior to a director, all people are judged by their skill/talent so the proof is in the pudding.

As far as recognition goes, it's nice to have but depends on the company. Becoming a manager/director at a high profile company is probably much more difficult than becoming one at a small company.

Top