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how long on avg for HR to contact after job application on web site ?

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  • Jul 20th, 2020 9:07 am
[OP]
Banned
Jul 13, 2019
317 posts
97 upvotes

how long on avg for HR to contact after job application on web site ?

title says it all

I know the covid-19 situation may have changed the situation

I'm tempted to email the manager directly just in case somehow my application doesn't pass HR screening (although it should since I believe my experience and skills fit the job description ), but I know this is risky since it could be viewed as intrusive
12 replies
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
13006 posts
9961 upvotes
Edmonton
joyceetal wrote: title says it all

I know the covid-19 situation may have changed the situation

I'm tempted to email the manager directly just in case somehow my application doesn't pass HR screening (although it should since I believe my experience and skills fit the job description ), but I know this is risky since it could be viewed as intrusive
Somewhere between 1 day and 3 months (+/- 6 months)...

C
Member
Oct 5, 2019
237 posts
237 upvotes
CNeufeld wrote: Somewhere between 1 day and 3 months (+/- 6 months)...

C
Probably anywhere from right away to never. Yes I know not very helpful but that’s the reality of most applications unfortunately.
Member
Oct 5, 2019
237 posts
237 upvotes
joyceetal wrote: title says it all

I know the covid-19 situation may have changed the situation

I'm tempted to email the manager directly just in case somehow my application doesn't pass HR screening (although it should since I believe my experience and skills fit the job description ), but I know this is risky since it could be viewed as intrusive
Vast majority of job applications done via website are just dropped and you never hear back. If you have a way to contact the hiring manager I would do it.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 20, 2018
7226 posts
6406 upvotes
joyceetal wrote: title says it all

I know the covid-19 situation may have changed the situation

I'm tempted to email the manager directly just in case somehow my application doesn't pass HR screening (although it should since I believe my experience and skills fit the job description ), but I know this is risky since it could be viewed as intrusive
from my experience, depends entirely on how much the actual hiring manager pushes. HR are generally very busy and if the hiring manager doesn't push for HR to vet and setup interviews and get process moving, it could sit for a long time or just lapse.

I know when I do postings, I have to keep nudging HR to move onto the next stage
[OP]
Banned
Jul 13, 2019
317 posts
97 upvotes
thanks everyone ...all helpful

but yes I do know the majority of web applications are dropped
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2009
5072 posts
3251 upvotes
Recruiter here:

If the applicant has a strong resume and great experience, 24-48 hours, if applicant has decent-ish resume but worth exploring, I'll sit on it for a few days and see how my first calls go.

If someone reaches out to me over LInkedIn, I always reply same day and give immediate feedback.

If you're not getting call backs, take a closer look at your resume and have at least 5-10 friends/colleagues look at it too. Take a closer look at job postings and evaluate yourself how closely your resume is to the posting.

I typically decide within 30 seconds whether I call on the resume or not.

Where I am, despite covid we're really busy hiring with over 100+ open positions. I am a bit slower to respond as with most of my colleagues and recruiter friends who have kids at home...It's...a struggle every day.

Bear with us all!
Sr. Member
Nov 22, 2017
931 posts
683 upvotes
Any resume sent online is a big crapshoot and a huge pita because sometimes you'll never even get a response back saying you didn't make it. My gut feeling is you get a rejection only when the posting is closed or the company is no longer hiring. The worst is when companies forget to delete the posting. Hence I track postings with career search engines to see when they have gone up. If they are up more than 2 weeks I don't even bother applying even if I'm qualified. Here's my advice which HRs hate and won't tell you because it makes their jobs harder. Work the hiring manager or HR by trying to contact them directly. The tough part is how to do this. Cold calling doesn't work for big firms only small ones at which point I'd probably go in person. For the big companies, start off by working your contacts and seeing if you have someone that works at the place. They could either pass your resume along but sometimes its even better if they give you HR name and contact info. Lastly go through LinkedIn, find top managers who are in charge of sending in requests for hiring. These people are extremely busy but there's an off chance that they are willing to entertain you for 30 seconds. You'll have much much better results this way.
[OP]
Banned
Jul 13, 2019
317 posts
97 upvotes
Extrahard wrote: Any resume sent online is a big crapshoot and a huge pita because sometimes you'll never even get a response back saying you didn't make it. My gut feeling is you get a rejection only when the posting is closed or the company is no longer hiring. The worst is when companies forget to delete the posting. Hence I track postings with career search engines to see when they have gone up. If they are up more than 2 weeks I don't even bother applying even if I'm qualified. Here's my advice which HRs hate and won't tell you because it makes their jobs harder. Work the hiring manager or HR by trying to contact them directly. The tough part is how to do this. Cold calling doesn't work for big firms only small ones at which point I'd probably go in person. For the big companies, start off by working your contacts and seeing if you have someone that works at the place. They could either pass your resume along but sometimes its even better if they give you HR name and contact info. Lastly go through LinkedIn, find top managers who are in charge of sending in requests for hiring. These people are extremely busy but there's an off chance that they are willing to entertain you for 30 seconds. You'll have much much better results this way.
I know the hiring manager email via a person I know but unfortunately he is too timidi to pass my resume along. as a result, I just decided to email him myself .
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jan 31, 2006
8004 posts
2339 upvotes
Toronto
bhrm wrote: Recruiter here:

If the applicant has a strong resume and great experience, 24-48 hours, if applicant has decent-ish resume but worth exploring, I'll sit on it for a few days and see how my first calls go.

If someone reaches out to me over LInkedIn, I always reply same day and give immediate feedback.

If you're not getting call backs, take a closer look at your resume and have at least 5-10 friends/colleagues look at it too. Take a closer look at job postings and evaluate yourself how closely your resume is to the posting.

I typically decide within 30 seconds whether I call on the resume or not.

Where I am, despite covid we're really busy hiring with over 100+ open positions. I am a bit slower to respond as with most of my colleagues and recruiter friends who have kids at home...It's...a struggle every day.

Bear with us all!
What industry skillset are you hiring? IT? clerical?
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2009
5072 posts
3251 upvotes
cgtlky wrote: What industry skillset are you hiring? IT? clerical?
R&D focused in Cloud, AI, ML,
Jr. Member
Feb 4, 2017
137 posts
33 upvotes
@bhrm
not to Hijack thread here... but would love to hear your opinions on "asking salary range in first call". Whats the purpose of that question other than finding if its in a range?
I feel its best to discuss this at last after discussion about job role, responsibilities. If its a same role as a experience and just getting seniority then its relatively easy to mention range based on expectation. but if its different duties and responsibilities then its difficult to predict range.

What would recruiter do if candidate low-balled himself/herself in expected range?

I would love to hear your opinion on what recruiter expect on salary range question?
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2009
5072 posts
3251 upvotes
bhushh009 wrote: @bhrm
not to Hijack thread here... but would love to hear your opinions on "asking salary range in first call". Whats the purpose of that question other than finding if its in a range?
I feel its best to discuss this at last after discussion about job role, responsibilities. If its a same role as a experience and just getting seniority then its relatively easy to mention range based on expectation. but if its different duties and responsibilities then its difficult to predict range.

What would recruiter do if candidate low-balled himself/herself in expected range?

I would love to hear your opinion on what recruiter expect on salary range question?
No worries! I have an on-going thread for this stuff, I'll bump it later.

Don't lowball yourself, that's a candidate mistake. Know your worth and stick to it. I flat out tell my candidates if they're too low or shooting too high. I ask politely if they have something as expectation or I tell them it's okay if they aren't sure if they haven't been on the job market lately or not thinking of looking. If you're not comfortable sharing current comp or expectations, just say so. But also don't be rude to recruiters, I'm human too!

Also don't give ridiculous ranges because to be honest, we don't have max limit lol. As job seekers, the more the better of course :)

Know your worth, evaluate your current total compensation and ask yourself, what would it take to make you change jobs? Some will say they will take 10% less if it meant closer to home/work from home, some will say they could take 20% less if it meant no travel, some say 20% increase because really they missed out on a promotion/raise. Also do recognize that some companies will OVERPAY you, to make it really hard to justify leaving your position. I also flat out tell candidates, that's way above market and hard to justify. At that point you have to hate your job to get out.

There's lots of ways to justify compensation, just keep in mind recruiters do what they can to make things possible. As i how I tell candidates, it's not my money I'm spending and they have to understand it's not up to me but a whole audience I have to also explain to.

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