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How to maintain cold room ventilation avoiding bugs and pests to getting in?

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  • Jan 26th, 2021 12:09 pm
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Jul 15, 2020
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How to maintain cold room ventilation avoiding bugs and pests to getting in?

We have cold room and currently the ventilation pipe is filled with insulation. Inspector suggested to remove insulation to avoid mold, so we are not sure how to maintain ventilation to avoid bugs and pests. Please suggest

Thanks!
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Feb 11, 2018
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Chenmahaj wrote: We have cold room and currently the ventilation pipe is filled with insulation. Inspector suggested to remove insulation to avoid mold, so we are not sure how to maintain ventilation to avoid bugs and pests. Please suggest

Thanks!
Install a piece of screen door mesh in each hole. I would also suggest a 1/4" steel hardware cloth fitting tight in the hole to prevent mice/voles in case you keep food in cold room. I assume outside piece is plastic and can be chewed.
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Oct 3, 2011
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My cold room has two 4" diameter holes with aluminum mesh covering on the outside. I closed the cold room door in winter time. When winter is over, I leave the door open for ventilation.
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Rockymountain wrote: My cold room has two 4" diameter holes with aluminum mesh covering on the outside. I closed the cold room door in winter time. When winter is over, I leave the door open for ventilation.
Just close door but don’t cover the vents to get air in/out avoiding mold built up.
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Dec 5, 2009
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Your inspector is correct they should not be closed. Your cold cellar is unconditioned space. Think of it as outside , or at best like your garage. Any food or drinks stored in there should be in sealed container. Bugs will not be an issue and pest like mice cannot get in.
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I covered mine with steel mesh, held securely in place with a ducting clamp.
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Sorry to hijack - looking for similar help/info.

We just bought a house with a decent size cold room under the front porch. It had a ton of wood in it (frame for porch above, shelving that was built in there etc).. I noticed it was starting to rot and it was getting very moist on the walls and freezing/frosting. I removed all of the wood for the concrete forming, and the shelving, but I still have a lot of moisture. I feel like it needs better ventilation/circulation? It has two 4" vents. I heard to put duct piping like dryer piping down to the floor on one will help circulate it a lot? I don't mind that its cold in there, but it's not good for storage at the moment which is ideally what we want to do with it.
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cyphon21 wrote: Sorry to hijack - looking for similar help/info.

We just bought a house with a decent size cold room under the front porch. It had a ton of wood in it (frame for porch above, shelving that was built in there etc).. I noticed it was starting to rot and it was getting very moist on the walls and freezing/frosting. I removed all of the wood for the concrete forming, and the shelving, but I still have a lot of moisture. I feel like it needs better ventilation/circulation? It has two 4" vents. I heard to put duct piping like dryer piping down to the floor on one will help circulate it a lot? I don't mind that its cold in there, but it's not good for storage at the moment which is ideally what we want to do with it.
I don't understand this. My parents have 2 cold rooms on either end of the house (40yr old house), both under concrete porches. There is no open ventilation in either room and they both function as I would expect a cold room to function - namely, it's colder than the rest of house, without extreme swings in temperature.

In both of the houses we have owned over the last 10 years (15yrs was the oldest), our cold rooms are ridiculously cold in the winter - like outdoor -20 cold, and absurdly hot and humid in the summer. I cant figure out why they just can't build them like the ones my parents have.
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This is our cold cellar underneath the front porch - custom built shelving. When we moved in (2016) ... it was NOT even remotely close to what it looks like now. The shelving was really half-a$$ed ...

IMG_20201208_105321.jpg


The ventilation hole was a ventilation hole ... no covering whatsoever (but luckily no sign of bugs, pests, etc when we took ownership of the house. So I made my own mesh covering ...


IMG_20210125_141158.jpg
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Toukolou wrote: I don't understand this. My parents have 2 cold rooms on either end of the house (40yr old house), both under concrete porches. There is no open ventilation in either room and they both function as I would expect a cold room to function - namely, it's colder than the rest of house, without extreme swings in temperature.

In both of the houses we have owned over the last 10 years (15yrs was the oldest), our cold rooms are ridiculously cold in the winter - like outdoor -20 cold, and absurdly hot and humid in the summer. I cant figure out why they just can't build them like the ones my parents have.
I share the same sentiment. My parent's 50yo house's cold room maintains the perfect temp throughout the year, with no ventilation or anything, while my 5yo house has huge swings in temps throughout the year (with proper ventilation). I'm not sure which one is how cold rooms are intended to function, but I'd very much prefer my parent's
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Toukolou wrote: I don't understand this. My parents have 2 cold rooms on either end of the house (40yr old house), both under concrete porches. There is no open ventilation in either room and they both function as I would expect a cold room to function - namely, it's colder than the rest of house, without extreme swings in temperature.

In both of the houses we have owned over the last 10 years (15yrs was the oldest), our cold rooms are ridiculously cold in the winter - like outdoor -20 cold, and absurdly hot and humid in the summer. I cant figure out why they just can't build them like the ones my parents have.
Depending on the doorway I could imagine is the difference. I have a solid steel door, so when it's closed its sealed off from the rest of the house. I am guessing the moisture is like just there and not going away due to being there prior and just keeps freezing and thawing. I am going to put a small heater fan and see if that helps dry it out. But I've read if I run duct work down to the floor from one of the vents, like a dryer vent, that will help with air circulation.
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timofeewho wrote: I share the same sentiment. My parent's 50yo house's cold room maintains the perfect temp throughout the year, with no ventilation or anything, while my 5yo house has huge swings in temps throughout the year (with proper ventilation). I'm not sure which one is how cold rooms are intended to function, but I'd very much prefer my parent's
I think the idea is they maintain a relatively steady temperature throughout the year, not the 50 degree swings between summer and winter that we experience. I mean, what can you even keep in a room like that?! Certainly not wine or food. It's ridiculous.
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To the original point of this thread: I covered mine with a fine stainless steel mesh secured with a ss frame which is secured to the wall with tapcons and sealed with silicone. Anything plastic can be chewed by mice and voles - I speak from experience.

As to where this thread has gone...

A cold storage room which is concrete on all six sides will have pretty stable temperatures from day to day or week to week. Ours is just such a unit - almost 30' long, 4' wide, 7' tall, mostly buried with basically only its roof exposed to the sun - and that exposure is south-facing. Summers, the temps do climb to around 14C and the winter temps fall to around 5C but the day to day fluctuations are negligible - that's the concrete doing its job. I've seen cold storage rooms where it's basically a corner of the basement and, frankly, I wouldn't expect good cold-storage performance out of one of those, even with the interior walls and ceiling insulated.
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CaptSmethwick wrote: To the original point of this thread: I covered mine with a fine stainless steel mesh secured with a ss frame which is secured to the wall with tapcons and sealed with silicone. Anything plastic can be chewed by mice and voles - I speak from experience.

As to where this thread has gone...

A cold storage room which is concrete on all six sides will have pretty stable temperatures from day to day or week to week. Ours is just such a unit - almost 30' long, 4' wide, 7' tall, mostly buried with basically only its roof exposed to the sun - and that exposure is south-facing. Summers, the temps do climb to around 14C and the winter temps fall to around 5C but the day to day fluctuations are negligible - that's the concrete doing its job. I've seen cold storage rooms where it's basically a corner of the basement and, frankly, I wouldn't expect good cold-storage performance out of one of those, even with the interior walls and ceiling insulated.
Ours is exactly as described - 6 sides concrete, ours is east facing - and we have ridiculous temp fluctuations. What do you think is the reason for this?
"I'm a bit upset. I've been grab by the back without any alert and lubrification"
Lucky

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