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How is Metro College of Technology ?

[OP]
Member
User avatar
Jan 24, 2005
372 posts
7 upvotes
Woodbridge

How is Metro College of Technology ?

I recently saw an ad about Metro College of Technology in Toronto.

Has anyone heard about them or anyone studied there ?

Any comments ? Really appreciate your replies.
18 replies
Member
User avatar
Sep 4, 2008
257 posts
1 upvote
Sounds like a private school. What do they teach? What does it cost? Can you get a comparable course at a comm. college and how much cheaper is it to attend the comm. college? :lol:
Is looking for good deal the same as being basically cheap? :?:
[OP]
Member
User avatar
Jan 24, 2005
372 posts
7 upvotes
Woodbridge
florider wrote: Go to a "real" college!
Already applying to the 'real' colleges.
But wanted to know if anyone had heard about Metro.Fake.College of Technology. :cheesygri

Fees could be 3 times the normal (community college).

I am looking for lotto 649's next winning numbers hidden in the RFD's forum posts. :D
Member
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Sep 4, 2008
257 posts
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Sometimes these colleges use "real" sounding names and put out glossy brochures showing their "campus".....I remember one used a picture of the Ontario Legislature as their "library" and another, which had small offices in an 20 storey office tower at Don Mills and Eglinton used a picture of the building with the "college" name photoshopped onto the building itself. :confused: They then marketed aggressively in Asia or in the immigrant communities in toronto and sucked in a whole bunch of people who paid exhorbitant fees for dubious programs. :mad: I'd hate to see anyone ripped off in this way, so check these places out carefully.

I should add that there are plenty of legitimate career colleges and schools but the student has to satisfy himself that the program is right for them. :D
Is looking for good deal the same as being basically cheap? :?:
Newbie
Aug 31, 2013
5 posts
I was wondering how is their (metro college of tech) process plant piping design course. It seems currently there is no other institution in Ontario provides similar training. Does anyone here know any other place in GTA which provides such training? I understand a community college will be a more economical option; however, if there is no other place to learn piping design probably metro college of tech is the only option for now! I am confused.
Newbie
Nov 19, 2014
2 posts
Toronto, ON
I took a Second career paralegal course with Metro College of Technology and got very satisfied with my program and the job that I got upon graduation!
Newbie
Nov 19, 2014
2 posts
Toronto, ON
Their programs are all career oriented and very short, but intense. Paralegal course was the longest - 52 weeks and 120 hr of practicum. I loved it! It helped me get prepared for the future career and my first job in the new field. I completed a Hospitality program in one of the community colleges in Ontario but going back to school for another 2-3 years wasn't possible for me. That's why I chose a Second Career program and completed it within a year. And they offered me a financial aid as well, that helped a lot! It's your career and your choice, look at your options, do a research and then pick the right institution for yourself! For different people there are different solutions! Wishing all the best!
Newbie
Jan 13, 2015
1 posts
Whitby, ON
Hey,... can anyone tell me what this place is like,, right now... as at Jan. 14/15... was thinking of going there!!
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 17, 2008
2277 posts
52 upvotes
Toronto
Brightideaz wrote: I took a Second career paralegal course with Metro College of Technology and got very satisfied with my program and the job that I got upon graduation!
This post strikes me as written by one of the recruiters working for the school. It's a for-profit company and the "counselors" are commissioned salespeople essentially. The schools are expensive, unrecognized, their curriculums are questionable, the instructors are people who did not succeed in industry.

In general: avoid.

Why would you even consider this option when you have decent public schools like George Brown available for a 1/3 of the price?

I question how these for-profit outfits are even allowed to operate in Canada, since their "students"/customers are eligible for OSAP financing, but the quality of their training does not fall under any sort of scrutiny. Seems like a great way to funnel public tax dollars into some very unscrupulous, shady entities.
Newbie
Jan 12, 2015
92 posts
4 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Metro College of Technology (MCT) has provided premier, practical, vocational education for local and overseas students. This mix makes learning at Metro more exciting, challenging and realistic. Metro is recognized and respected for offering quality tertiary VET courses that provide real career pathways by targeting industry skill shortage areas. Our nationally recognized Certificate and Diploma courses are offered to service the Business, Hospitality, Baking, Community Services Work and the Aged Care Industries not only in Australia, but around the Globe. It's a kind of career training school. Also ,for more information, you can search his website.
Deal Expert
Oct 6, 2005
16565 posts
2283 upvotes
summersmith1993 wrote: Metro College of Technology (MCT) has provided premier, practical, vocational education for local and overseas students.
There's really no point in going to a private career college unless you're a foreign student who can't get into a "regular" college or University or the applicant is desperate / unqualified.
Newbie
May 30, 2010
3 posts
2 upvotes
Toronto
koalorka wrote: This post strikes me as written by one of the recruiters working for the school. It's a for-profit company and the "counselors" are commissioned salespeople essentially. The schools are expensive, unrecognized, their curriculums are questionable, the instructors are people who did not succeed in industry.

In general: avoid.

Why would you even consider this option when you have decent public schools like George Brown available for a 1/3 of the price?

I question how these for-profit outfits are even allowed to operate in Canada, since their "students"/customers are eligible for OSAP financing, but the quality of their training does not fall under any sort of scrutiny. Seems like a great way to funnel public tax dollars into some very unscrupulous, shady entities.
florider wrote: Go to a "real" college!
Disclaimer: I don't work for Metro College or for that matter for any college. I have however taken courses at both private colleges and so-called "real" colleges. True there are some private colleges that offer sub-par courses but so is true of public colleges. Anyone who argues that "public" college is somehow better than privately owned is obviously biased and their opinions should be ignored. Being familiar with the public education system, I must say that public colleges are a lot less efficient when it comes to spending tax money, and very often offer courses that have nothing to do with real life.

For example, a student recently came to our company seeking internship in developing a website. She paid $5,000 for a 3-month course at the so-called "real" (aka. public) college and couldn't even do a decent HTML website. A similar course at a private college will be far more advanced and will cost less. In addition, private colleges don't receive subsidies from the government, unlike public ones, and have to compete to win students with best offerings. Private colleges are also audited by the government and have to maintain standards like graduation and employment rates, and only the ones that do are allowed to continue operating. If a private college has been in business for many years, this is a pretty good indication that they keep high standards and certainly not lower than public institutions.

Overall, just wanted to dispel the myth that colleges that receive a lot of public money (what some posts here called "real" colleges) are somehow better than private colleges. If you are looking to take a course that will help your career, don't listen to biased opinions. Go and talk to people at both types of colleges and make your own decision. After all, once you graduate, the people that offered unsubstantiated advice here will bear no responsibility for your success. You will. All the best.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 17, 2008
2277 posts
52 upvotes
Toronto
tordude wrote: Disclaimer: I don't work for Metro College or for that matter for any college. I have however taken courses at both private colleges and so-called "real" colleges. True there are some private colleges that offer sub-par courses but so is true of public colleges. Anyone who argues that "public" college is somehow better than privately owned is obviously biased and their opinions should be ignored. Being familiar with the public education system, I must say that public colleges are a lot less efficient when it comes to spending tax money, and very often offer courses that have nothing to do with real life.

For example, a student recently came to our company seeking internship in developing a website. She paid $5,000 for a 3-month course at the so-called "real" (aka. public) college and couldn't even do a decent HTML website. A similar course at a private college will be far more advanced and will cost less. In addition, private colleges don't receive subsidies from the government, unlike public ones, and have to compete to win students with best offerings. Private colleges are also audited by the government and have to maintain standards like graduation and employment rates, and only the ones that do are allowed to continue operating. If a private college has been in business for many years, this is a pretty good indication that they keep high standards and certainly not lower than public institutions.

Overall, just wanted to dispel the myth that colleges that receive a lot of public money (what some posts here called "real" colleges) are somehow better than private colleges. If you are looking to take a course that will help your career, don't listen to biased opinions. Go and talk to people at both types of colleges and make your own decision. After all, once you graduate, the people that offered unsubstantiated advice here will bear no responsibility for your success. You will. All the best.
A two post account springs to life to passionately defend private career colleges? Who are you even kidding?

This business model is a parasite on the taxpayer in Canada, because desperate people are being swindled into unjustifiably expensive programs (which are funded through OSAP) at these bottom-feeding businesses masquerading as institutions of learning, and they are obtaining nothing of tangible economic value, since the training is often not recognized by any regulatory bodies.

We should start to lobby to make any programs at these places ineligible for OSAP funding. If someone is willing to take the risk, they themselves should be burdened with the expense, not the tax payer.

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