Computers & Electronics

How much better are TVs from now compared to around 8 years ago?

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[OP]
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Oct 9, 2003
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How much better are TVs from now compared to around 8 years ago?

My wife's tv is a 60 inch 1080p smart lg tv we paid around 1500 for back then and it's been great but we're looking at upgrading hers soon as it's getting a bit finicky.

However we were wondering how much of a difference we would see compared to some of these $600-800 65 inch units. There is obvious stuff like the 4k but other than that would it really be that big of a difference performance wise?
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Saint John
I doubt you'd see much difference in picture quality and features if you buy a budget $600-800 "LED" (actually LED-backlit LCD). I wouldn't be surprised if you felt like it was a downgrade. Some "LED" TVs now have a local dimming feature that turns off the LED backlight in a certain part of the screen if it's supposed to be showing black, but this feature is usually found starting around the high-midrange price point. Even with this feature, low-end and midrange "LED" TVs don't look much better now, even with higher 4K resolution. There is Samsung's heavily (and misleadingly) advertised "quantum dot" technology, but even that is a way of dressing up the same old tech in new marketing (and it's only used on their high-end TVs).

If you want a TV that is a significant upgrade to your 8-year-old LCD, you'll be looking at OLED TVs from LG or Sony... and of course a 65" model will run you 3-4X what you're looking to spend. You can find the 55" LG B9 (2019) OLEDs for $1600 on clearance right now. Unlike LCD tech, OLED uses individually lit pixels and can thus turn them off completely, giving you perfect black levels and an otherwise stunning-looking picture.

Of course, if your current TV is dying and you have to replace it, you'll have to spend your money on something. However, it's difficult in good conscience to recommend a cheap 65" TV -- you'll get what you paid for.
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Mar 23, 2009
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Yes 4K OLED is the gold standard but if your budget doesn’t allow it, then a Sony or Samsung higher mid-end 4K HDR VA LCD TV panel is still a huge improvement over $1500 LCDs from a decade ago. That would be something like the Sony X900 series.

However, that Sony X900 LCD is also close to $1500 for a 65” model. Thus, I would shift your budget higher if possible. $800 for an LCD will get you a better quality image than your old TV but it’s not really in the same league as the $1500 LCD TVs, which in turn aren’t in the same league as the $3000 OLED TVs.
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OLED has its own drawbacks, like brightness limitations and longevity. Not sure if those issues have been solved yet.
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board123 wrote: OLED has its own drawbacks, like brightness limitations and longevity. Not sure if those issues have been solved yet.
For most usage brightness is no longer is an issue for OLED. More important is the possibility of burn-in but that’s really only with very specific usage patterns. I’ve had my OLED for going on two years with no hint of burn-in. I don’t do anything special and just watch TV and movies. I don’t game with a non-changing HUD for 8 hours a day though.

But it’s a moot discussion anyway since OLED is about 3-4X the OP’s budget.
[OP]
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EugW wrote: For most usage brightness is no longer is an issue for OLED. More important is the possibility of burn-in but that’s really only with very specific usage patterns. I’ve had my OLED for going on two years with no hint of burn-in. I don’t do anything special and just watch TV and movies. I don’t game with a non-changing HUD for 8 hours a day though.

But it’s a moot discussion anyway since OLED is about 3-4X the OP’s budget.
Well it's really not our budget, we are just wondering what we need over what is just flash.
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IMO, OLED is the real deal. The only usage case I can imagine for an LCD TV right now is if you're putting it in a room of floor-to-ceiling windows and need 1000 nits of brightness (or if you game 8 hours a day with a stationary HUD with the brightness turned up, as ... very niche. If you can accommodate a $2K+ TV in your budget, then you should be looking for a good deal on an LG B9 OLED. I got mine for $2300 plus a $100 Costco gift card a month ago; I think you can still find them close to this price, but they'll soon be gone and the only option will be $3000+ for a BX model.
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Jimboski wrote: OLED is the biggest upgrade you can buy right now versus your old TV. Don't mistaken QLED for OLED, two entirely different thing. Only LG has OLED's on the market.
Not quite correct. LG is currently the only maker of large OLED panels used in TVs but they supply them to a host of other TV manufacturers as well. In the Canadian market, OLED TV manufacturers include LG, Sony, and Panasonic.
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bobohobo2kx wrote: Not quite correct. LG is currently the only maker of large OLED panels used in TVs but they supply them to a host of other TV manufacturers as well. In the Canadian market, OLED TV manufacturers include LG, Sony, and Panasonic.
You're right, only now i see some reviews for Sony OLED's.
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Quite a lot better.

The QLED or Quantum Dots depending on the marketing terms have pushed the lower end (but not available at the lowest end) tvs into the middle end, for close to the same price. Meanwhile Hisense went from being a low-end manufacturer to mid-end and they are starting to put out models that are closer to $1000 but until they get their image processors equal to what Sony is doing, along with much brighter panels, they wont be touching Sony at the high-end (e.g. 900 and 950 series).

OLED is still king but costs way more.
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mr_raider wrote: Use it 'till it dies.
I would agree with this. Keep using it if it still works.
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Super strokey wrote: Well it's really not our budget, we are just wondering what we need over what is just flash.
If budget is not an issue, and you don't keep the same channel or game HUD up 24/7, then buy an OLED. :)

It's a HUGE upgrade over what you have, and for most usage it's also a significant upgrade over all the LCD models too, including the so-called QLEDs.

https://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/lg/cx-oled
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Jan 12, 2017
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I was gob smacked when I saw my first 'plasma panel many moons ago when panels where 20K+, it was miles above NTSC 520 line broadcast and VHS was just plain pathetic. I bought into a 720p Viewsonic as my first 27" panel at $1400 from Costco and I just stared at demos for days. The next leap was a 1920p LG and although it's good, it was just an incremental upgrade in size and although the image was better, I'd sit further away which balanced out the upgrade. Looking at 4K these days, I doubt I'd appreciate the extra pixels, given the media and sources available, I had opportunity to see a 4K TCL 65" in situ, and wasn't impressed. The only jump I could see would be OLED and at the 3K purchase price; the image fidelity hardly justifies the two thousand dollar expense along with the associated media costs. I'm sure the savings would likely be enjoyed at my local Imax.

Suggest at bit of patience, new panel designs and manufacturing techniques will further reduce and improve.

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