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How to quit a good job

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  • Jan 10th, 2021 5:32 pm
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[OP]
Newbie
Dec 31, 2019
8 posts
1 upvote
Toronto

How to quit a good job

Hi guys, long lurker on this forum, first thread tho!

Long story short, I got a job as an intern 1.5 year ago in the and I've been promoted to full time employee 1 year ago in the tech industry. I work in a small team and even though I wouldn't say we're really friends on a personal level, there is a great vibe in the team and we're very casual between us, manager included. My manager is really a good guy, found an arrangement with me so I can continue my masters degree and work full time. Honestly I can find no negative point to the manager and the team.

The thing is that I'll complete my masters degree really soon and I'm considering continuing to do a PhD. That would require me to quit my job and renounce to the relatively good pay I have (no issues with the latter still living with my parents lol and I have savings). I'm involved in important projects at my job, how can I quit without negatively impacting my team?

When should I inform my manager about my decision to quit? Enough for him to get an intern/full time employee and giving my replacement adequate training for my tasks/processes? 1 month? 2 weeks?

For those who would use the argument that it's just business and I should look for myself and not the company, I'd reply in advance that I was treated very well and putting my team in a short staffed position would be far from fair...
Last edited by gabe549 on Jan 6th, 2021 5:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
13 replies
Deal Addict
Oct 24, 2010
1530 posts
1296 upvotes
Ottawa
It's up to your comfort level. Do you think they'd appreciate, and take advantage of, 2 months?
Do you think they'd terminate you on the spot?

(Ontario) Legally, the moment you give notice, they can walk you to the door and pay you statutory notice pay, which in your case would be 2 weeks provided you've given at least 2 weeks of notice. So if you give 2 months of notice, you might need to be prepared to walk away with 2 weeks' worth of pay.

Do you think they'll do that? Are you prepared if they do?
Deal Addict
Jun 27, 2006
1712 posts
2017 upvotes
Wait until you get into a PhD program before saying anything. At this point, you are just considering it so why jump the gun?

Say you get in with 5 months before starting, will you want to travel before resuming your studies or looking at working right up to when the new term starts? Right now, you probably don't know and it really doesn't matter until 1. you decided to get a PhD 2. actually get accepted into a program.
Deal Addict
Jul 12, 2008
3149 posts
985 upvotes
GTA
You have worked there less than 2 years, 2 to 3 weeks notice is ideal and will give them enough time to figure out the way forward. It happens all the time in all settings, don't feel guilty or obligated if you have to go (they might already know that a PHD is inevitable).
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 31, 2019
8 posts
1 upvote
Toronto
Thanks for your replies, all, very appreciated. I don't have much experience about those sort of things and your opinion is very welcome!
Dynatos wrote: Do you think they'll do that? Are you prepared if they do?
Don't think so but they may let me go if I finish training my replacement in less than 2 months...I'd be prepared anyway, I don't really care about 2 less months.
maple1 wrote: Wait until you get into a PhD program before saying anything. At this point, you are just considering it so why jump the gun?

Say you get in with 5 months before starting, will you want to travel before resuming your studies or looking at working right up to when the new term starts? Right now, you probably don't know and it really doesn't matter until 1. you decided to get a PhD 2. actually get accepted into a program.
I'd quit even if I don't get into a PhD program. After my masters I'd be looking for another type of job so the question is more about how to quit than if I quit.
EDIT: if I had 5 months before starting I'd rather spend them on research (research assistant/academic projects/etc).
Deal Addict
Oct 24, 2010
1530 posts
1296 upvotes
Ottawa
I was with my previous company for 7 years. I carved out a pretty niche role that was difficult to fill. I had the utmost respect for my team and my direct management. I knew they would have difficulty backfilling me, but unfortunately my new employer wanted me as quick as possible and we mutually agreed to 2 weeks.

So I gave 2 weeks notice.

It took them over a year to permanently backfill my position. But I'm still in touch with my previous team, and have felt no animosity from them caused by my short notice period.
Sr. Member
Nov 22, 2017
694 posts
406 upvotes
Sounds like you've made up your mind because I was going to say what is your goal with the PhD?? In most industries it's a time waster unless you are thinking about working in research or academia or if its just a personal goal which is fine too.

I wouldn't worry too much about when you tell your work you are leaving. You are still early in your career so still easily replaceable. I would give 3 weeks even one month notice just to be more courteous. If you want you can even plant seeds now by saying something vague and casual like "I'm thinking of doing a PhD" so that if you do tell them last minute they aren't shocked.
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 31, 2019
8 posts
1 upvote
Toronto
The PhD is a personal goal and also because I want to work in industry research.

Yeah, seems I'm overthinking it, best idea so far would be to drop a hint like 1.5 month before leaving and giving a 1 month notice. Don't really care if they drop me on the spot and the 1 month becomes 2 weeks.
Newbie
Nov 28, 2020
80 posts
76 upvotes
They way you've described the manager and team, I don't see any issues. If you plan on giving a good amount of notice and your departure isn't to move to another employer, chances are they would keep you on for the notice period. They would also likely send you out with a genuine handshake and invitation to return in future.
Sr. Member
Jun 3, 2006
726 posts
125 upvotes
Markham
If I were in your position, I would probably give a few months notice just out of courtesy. I know a lot of people will say that there's no loyalty, etc, but it just feels like the right thing to do since you've been treated well. Your leader working with you to accommodate your studies is not something that he had to do, and I think this is at least somewhat a way to pay it back.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 18, 2007
4436 posts
423 upvotes
Just be nice, courteous and professional about it.

Personally though, unless you're getting a free ride, I'd work part time (say once,twice/week) if you can swing it, to have some extra cash flow and/or less debt when you finish. Let's be honest, no one only studies/sleeps.
Then again they may say no thanks, but at least you tried.
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 31, 2019
8 posts
1 upvote
Toronto
IceBlueShoes wrote: Just be nice, courteous and professional about it.

Personally though, unless you're getting a free ride, I'd work part time (say once,twice/week) if you can swing it, to have some extra cash flow and/or less debt when you finish. Let's be honest, no one only studies/sleeps.
Then again they may say no thanks, but at least you tried.
Yeah that's a good idea. In fact before getting the full time position we talked about working part time on projects only (no operational tasks) for about 15-20h a week, but then I just went on accepting the full time. So they may be open, thanks for the idea!
Newbie
Aug 9, 2014
83 posts
12 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
I think 1 month would be good enough for the employer. Any more notice and you will get tired of hearing people talk about you leaving and I think it can negatively impact the employer because they will stop giving you projects or more work as they know you are leaving.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 21, 2010
5646 posts
2468 upvotes
Toronto
gabe549 wrote: Yeah that's a good idea. In fact before getting the full time position we talked about working part time on projects only (no operational tasks) for about 15-20h a week, but then I just went on accepting the full time. So they may be open, thanks for the idea!
I'd do this too. Also remember it's very relevant that you're thinking of leaving because you want to study, rather than work somewhere else (e.g. a competitor), and you should make sure people know this. People are likely to be genuinely happy for you or at least completely understand it if you're leaving or needing time off/part time to do a PhD. Don't overthink it because it's almost impossible to burn a bridge if you're going to go for further studies and you behave professionally. Your manager would have to be a massive douche to hold a grudge over that.

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