Food & Drink

How to read the nutrition info on canned food?

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 4th, 2016 11:50 am
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toronto19850 wrote:
Sep 30th, 2016 6:02 pm
death_hawk wrote:
Sep 30th, 2016 5:46 pm
toronto19850 wrote:
Sep 30th, 2016 2:25 pm

That is water that comes off, not oil / grease, unfortunately thats not how the world works...
Unfortunately that's exactly how it works. While there is some water since most consumer bacon is wet cured, anything that's left over after cooking is oil because oil doesn't evaporate like water does.
toronto19850 wrote:
Sep 30th, 2016 4:29 pm


You can think that, doesn't make a difference in my life.
There's no thinking. It's 100% true.
Whether or not it makes a difference in your life is irrelevant.
Fat doesn't just magically come off meat because you cook it. Unless you added oil to the meat then what comes out the meat is water.
It's not magical, it's called rendering.
If it was water, the heat of the pan would evaporate it leaving a dry pan.

Don't believe me? Put some water in a pan and crank it to high.
Then put some oil in the pan and do the same thing.

Then put a lump of suet or other animal fat and see what happens.

EDIT: Also if it was water, where does lard, tallow, duck fat, schmaltz, etc come from?
Unless you for some reason think it's pork water, beef water, duck water, chicken water, etc.
So if you cook butter, it loses fat? That is how logical your statement is to claim that cooking meat melts fat off it.
No, if you cook butter it loses water.
Also I said the exact opposite that if you cook animal fats, that you DO NOT lose it like you would water.
It melts into the pan and remains in the pan.
Water comes out of the meat, not fat.
Yes. Water does in fact come out of meat, especially meats that contain extra water like consumer bacon.
However, fat also melts off meat.
If you marinated the meat or added oil to it then yes, oil will be in the pan, it is not the fat from the meat.
Meat without any additional additives like oil will also melt out fat.
Go trim the fat off beef, throw that in a pan, see if it dissolves and turns into oil...NOPE.
Actually it does. I do it once in a while because I love beef fat. It's what I use to make yorkshire puddings.
I more regularly do it with pork fat since I don't have a reliable source for beef fat so I have to collect my own from my trim from briskets.
I also make bacon bits from bacon and collect the bacon fat from that.
Why would there be any fat in the cooked bacon if fat just melts off? What you're saying makes no sense at all, is there only a percentage of fat that can melt and the other percentage of fat can't?
This is exactly it.
Plus there's other membranes and connective tissues that have a higher (or not at all) melting point within the fat.

If you want to try this at home, go to the supermarket and buy a box of lard. This is 100% pure pork fat.
Toss it in a pan and it'll melt.

Then take a piece of pork fat. Put in on a low flame (or oven for more consistent temperature) and you'll see fat dissolve out of it.
You won't get all of it out because of what I said above. This is also why you should cut it down as small as possible to expose as much of the renderable fat so there's less trapped inside membranes and stuff.
When you're finished melting said pork fat, strain it and put it in the fridge. You'll get lard.
Then you can try the above.

If it was water, sticking it in the fridge would do exactly squat because water doesn't solidify at refrigeration temperatures.
It also doesn't thicken up (and most likely solidify or at least thicken significantly) at room temperature.
I think everyone knows the freezing point of water, so if it was water it should be 100% liquid at room temperature.
[OP]
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Apr 13, 2008
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Ok, I see. So in a can of 540ml beans (with water) and the nutrition label that "250ml drained = 150 calories, I am actually getting LESS than 150 calories/250ml * 540ml = 324 calories after draining the water. I think the drained beans is probably about 2/3 of the original 540ml can (1/3 of the can is basically water), so can I estimate that the actual calories per can is about 2/3 * 324 = 216 calories? I know it is a rough estimate but 324 calories vs 216 calories are actually quite different. Please let me know if I am incorrect. Thanks.
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henrycao8 wrote:
Oct 1st, 2016 8:03 am
Ok, I see. So in a can of 540ml beans (with water) and the nutrition label that "250ml drained = 150 calories, I am actually getting LESS than 150 calories/250ml * 540ml = 324 calories after draining the water. I think the drained beans is probably about 2/3 of the original 540ml can (1/3 of the can is basically water), so can I estimate that the actual calories per can is about 2/3 * 324 = 216 calories? I know it is a rough estimate but 324 calories vs 216 calories are actually quite different. Please let me know if I am incorrect. Thanks.
If accuracy is important for the calories, then essential drain the beans, and measure out the remaining ingredients. Taking 540ml then subtracting the liquid is not quite right because liquid fills the spaces between the beans the half cup measure is not for if you squished the beans down with out any spaces. If accuracy is important for the calories, then essential drain the beans, and measure out the remaining ingredients. You will find that you will get close to 2 cups of beans drained in a 540 ml can.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
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Nov 15, 2008
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henrycao8 wrote:
Oct 1st, 2016 8:03 am
Ok, I see. So in a can of 540ml beans (with water) and the nutrition label that "250ml drained = 150 calories, I am actually getting LESS than 150 calories/250ml * 540ml = 324 calories after draining the water. I think the drained beans is probably about 2/3 of the original 540ml can (1/3 of the can is basically water), so can I estimate that the actual calories per can is about 2/3 * 324 = 216 calories? I know it is a rough estimate but 324 calories vs 216 calories are actually quite different. Please let me know if I am incorrect. Thanks.
The most accurate thing to do would be to drain and rinse the beans, then weigh them, then use 138 kcal/100g as your factor

https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show ... &fgcd=&ds=
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toronto19850 wrote:
Sep 30th, 2016 2:25 pm
Vladimir wrote:
Sep 30th, 2016 12:16 pm
toronto19850 wrote:
Sep 30th, 2016 7:41 am
Read what the label says the can contains, multiply by the nutritional information. The 540ml relates to the nutritional information, ie. it contains 540ml of 'drained' beans.

540/250 * 150 = 324 calories per can

It's a lot harder to calculate the calories for a serving, but it's easy to calculate for the whole can.



Well if it says the patty is 200calories, it's going to be 200 calories whether its cooked or raw lol cooking food doesn't decrease the calories of food....
Of course it can. Look at a package of bacon the next time you buy it. It will say something like 250 calories per 2 uncooked strips.
Now when you fry bacon you see that big puddle of grease left in your pan? That is about 150 calories worth. So depending on if you use it for something else or not (frying eggs/hashbrown) you are eating less then 1/2 the amount of calories then the package says.

So his burger point was that if the patty says 450 calories, but then as you are grilling it on the BBQ and a bunch of the fat melts and drains into your BBQ you might actually only be eating 350-400 calories worth...
That is water that comes off, not oil / grease, unfortunately thats not how the world works...
Ok if that is water that comes off the bacon and not oil/grease, how about you go cook some bacon. Take the bacon out, leave the "water" in it. Let the pan cool. Once cool go put it in the fridge. After letting it sit in the fridge for a few hours go and drink it and let me know how that water tastes. Oh wait, it won't be liquid anymore it will be solid because it is fat...
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Jun 21, 2016
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I guess only magical fat does melt off meat when cooked...just not non-magical fat like the pork in this pic :)

Image
Vladimir wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2016 12:27 pm
toronto19850 wrote:
Sep 30th, 2016 2:25 pm
Vladimir wrote:
Sep 30th, 2016 12:16 pm


Of course it can. Look at a package of bacon the next time you buy it. It will say something like 250 calories per 2 uncooked strips.
Now when you fry bacon you see that big puddle of grease left in your pan? That is about 150 calories worth. So depending on if you use it for something else or not (frying eggs/hashbrown) you are eating less then 1/2 the amount of calories then the package says.

So his burger point was that if the patty says 450 calories, but then as you are grilling it on the BBQ and a bunch of the fat melts and drains into your BBQ you might actually only be eating 350-400 calories worth...
That is water that comes off, not oil / grease, unfortunately thats not how the world works...
Ok if that is water that comes off the bacon and not oil/grease, how about you go cook some bacon. Take the bacon out, leave the "water" in it. Let the pan cool. Once cool go put it in the fridge. After letting it sit in the fridge for a few hours go and drink it and let me know how that water tastes. Oh wait, it won't be liquid anymore it will be solid because it is fat...

Try mixing water with that "magical fat" that comes out the meat when you cook it, it will mix. Fat and water DONT mix. That "magical fat" (water) that comes out of meat DOES mix with water.

Unless you added oil/marinade(oil) to the meat OR oil to the pan before you cooked it, then NO fat will be in the pan after you cook it. Meat is mostly WATER that's why your RAW meat weights MORE before you cook it. You really think meat loses ALMOST HALF it's weight because fat comes off it? Don't kid yourself!

Go look at the studies for george forman grills, they claim the same thing you do and trick people who aren't that bright who believe that fat actually comes off meat. Unfortunately the studies show it's all water.
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toronto19850 wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2016 2:07 pm
Try mixing water with that "magical fat" that comes out the meat when you cook it, it will mix. Fat and water DONT mix. That "magical fat" (water) that comes out of meat DOES mix with water.

Unless you added oil/marinade(oil) to the meat OR oil to the pan before you cooked it, then NO fat will be in the pan after you cook it. Meat is mostly WATER that's why your RAW meat weights MORE before you cook it. You really think meat loses ALMOST HALF it's weight because fat comes off it? Don't kid yourself!

Go look at the studies for george forman grills, they claim the same thing you do and trick people who aren't that bright who believe that fat actually comes off meat. Unfortunately the studies show it's all water.
The water that comes out of the meat comes out as water vapour (steam).

No matter what kind of lean meat/poultry/fish you cook, once it is cooked the weight is reduced by about 1/6.

Anything over 1/6 is rendered fat.

In the case of bacon (which is very fatty and wet-brined):

https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show ... sliced&ds=
https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show ... sliced&ds=

1 x 1 oz (28g) raw slice loses 7g of fat and 10g of water after cooking. 4g of fat and 3g of water remains in the bacon.

25% of the lost weight is fat
35% of the lost weight is water
Weight is reduced by 60%
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Aug 22, 2006
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toronto19850 wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2016 2:07 pm
I guess only magical fat does melt off meat when cooked...just not non-magical fat like the pork in this pic :)
You do realize that it takes time to render fat right?
To render all the fat out of bacon takes hours in an oven.

This type of pork isn't roasted for hours. If you did roast it for hours you will render more of the fat.
The meat will also be inedible but you will render the fat.
Try mixing water with that "magical fat" that comes out the meat when you cook it, it will mix. Fat and water DONT mix.

Sure it does. Then it separates.
It's the same principle as pouring drippings from a roast into a fat separator.
The fat rises to the top and the liquid at the bottom is poured out.
That "magical fat" (water) that comes out of meat DOES mix with water.
And then it separates. Unless you combine it with an emulsifier.
Unless you added oil/marinade(oil) to the meat OR oil to the pan before you cooked it, then NO fat will be in the pan after you cook it. Meat is mostly WATER that's why your RAW meat weights MORE before you cook it. You really think meat loses ALMOST HALF it's weight because fat comes off it? Don't kid yourself!
What kind of meat are you buying that half of it consists of fat?
Unless it's bacon (in which case it is) you can indeed render a good portion of fat out of bacon.
I just don't recommend doing it in a frying pan because it takes quite a while and is susceptible to burning.
Even very thin strips in an oven takes like 30 minutes.
Go look at the studies for george forman grills, they claim the same thing you do and trick people who aren't that bright who believe that fat actually comes off meat. Unfortunately the studies show it's all water.
If you don't believe it, boil both water and fat over high heat.
The water will go away. The fat won't.
Now try it with any sort of meat drippings or meat "water". You'll lose some of it due to water but I guarantee you there will be something left in the pan that won't evaporate.
You could boil it all day long and it'll catch fire before it boils off.
Catching fire and not boiling off are 2 sure signs that it isn't water because
1) Water doesn't catch fire
2) Water evaporates into steam

Fat does catch fire at high enough temperatures and will not evaporate.

But hey... I'm sure there's smarter people than me out there somehow making water catch fire and fat evaporate.
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toronto19850 wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2016 2:07 pm
I guess only magical fat does melt off meat when cooked...just not non-magical fat like the pork in this pic :)

Image
Vladimir wrote:
Oct 3rd, 2016 12:27 pm
toronto19850 wrote:
Sep 30th, 2016 2:25 pm


That is water that comes off, not oil / grease, unfortunately thats not how the world works...
Ok if that is water that comes off the bacon and not oil/grease, how about you go cook some bacon. Take the bacon out, leave the "water" in it. Let the pan cool. Once cool go put it in the fridge. After letting it sit in the fridge for a few hours go and drink it and let me know how that water tastes. Oh wait, it won't be liquid anymore it will be solid because it is fat...

Try mixing water with that "magical fat" that comes out the meat when you cook it, it will mix. Fat and water DONT mix. That "magical fat" (water) that comes out of meat DOES mix with water.

Unless you added oil/marinade(oil) to the meat OR oil to the pan before you cooked it, then NO fat will be in the pan after you cook it. Meat is mostly WATER that's why your RAW meat weights MORE before you cook it. You really think meat loses ALMOST HALF it's weight because fat comes off it? Don't kid yourself!

Go look at the studies for george forman grills, they claim the same thing you do and trick people who aren't that bright who believe that fat actually comes off meat. Unfortunately the studies show it's all water.
Great, did you try my exercise of cooking bacon in a pan and then drinking the remaining "water" after putting it in the fridge for a while? How did it go?

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