Real Estate

How small is your condo?

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 8th, 2019 8:35 pm
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Sr. Member
Dec 30, 2012
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Toronto
Younger people today don’t tend to acquire masses of “stuff” as previous generations did. They spend their money (what little they have) on “experiences” - trips, restaurants, etc. Therefore living in a space deemed tiny by an older person is very realistic for them. Less clutter, smaller surface area to clean. And as someone above noted, small living quarters are very normal in Europe even amongst wealthy people.
Sr. Member
Dec 30, 2012
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Toronto
ak-47 wrote:
Feb 15th, 2019 5:58 pm
I can't imagine how people can cook with this type of stove top, which is now getting common in 400-500 sq ft units.

Image
Why is it so hard to imagine? It’s an element. It heats up. You put a pot or pan on top. There, you’re cooking, just as you would on a full size stove.
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Feb 1, 2006
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Muskoka
TheSinner wrote:
Feb 15th, 2019 7:45 pm
smiling at neighbors
So weird. Since when is this a downside in life?
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Dec 13, 2016
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ak-47 wrote:
Feb 15th, 2019 5:58 pm
I can't imagine how people can cook with this type of stove top, which is now getting common in 400-500 sq ft units.

Image
You can't imagine, but you're gonna have to. This has been a setup in 30sqm asian condos for years. Now 30sqm is a luxury and the new standard is 21sqm.

A while back I posted a link where someone in my building (Toronto DT) was renting a studio without any kitchen or appliances for almost $1,500. You want a dinner, go to Tim's or Sobeys.
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Nov 6, 2010
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Montreal, QC
While the justification to use shoebox condos in Canada (with our massive land sprawls) may be foreign to some, it's a very common lifestyle for people in larger cities in Europe & Asia (and certain places like NYC also in North American). Most shoebox condos are indeed made for single people who aren't projected to cook larger amounts at a time. Likewise, they aren't projected to store large amounts of food so the fridges are small.

There's one building near my place where they use half size fridges which sounded super weird to me, but my cousin who works in real estate told him that building rents a lot to European and they don't mind at all since it's what a lot of them are used to back in Europe (having a small fridge and going to the grocery store every day ion the way back from work).

It's really a different lifestyle.
Member
Aug 16, 2011
358 posts
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OTTAWA
I have ones that can expand to 6 inches and is quite flexible in ensuring I have space to live in, on good days my condo can expand up to ten... Very flexible build.. Depending on the mood and flexibility... My condo fits both myself and my partner very comfortably and we feel good using it... The builders name started with T but it wasn't Tridel
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Apr 23, 2006
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Toronto
civiclease wrote:
Feb 16th, 2019 4:47 am
Why is it so hard to imagine? It’s an element. It heats up. You put a pot or pan on top. There, you’re cooking, just as you would on a full size stove.
Yes, I should've clarified that I am an avid home cook myself. I passed on condos with 24" cook tops because the largest element (7 to 8") wasn't big enough to fit a standard 9.5" stainless steel fry pan. For example, a 9.5" fry pan is necessary to fit a ribeye steak. And so I had to find condos with a standard 30" stove.
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Feb 29, 2008
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There are some good furniture places out there that specialize in furniture in tight spots. The euro stores are ahead of us in that regard. The micro condo is not new...it’s new to Canada.
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Dec 27, 2009
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ak-47 wrote:
Feb 15th, 2019 5:58 pm
I can't imagine how people can cook with this type of stove top, which is now getting common in 400-500 sq ft units.

Image
That would not work for me at all (I cook), but so many people just use their kitchens for "show" these days and don't even cook (or know how to cook). This would not work for anyone who actually likes to cook meals.
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Jul 4, 2006
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ak-47 wrote:
Feb 15th, 2019 5:58 pm
I can't imagine how people can cook with this type of stove top, which is now getting common in 400-500 sq ft units.
...
The other thing that's a huge pita in condo kitchens are that the microwave fan hood ranges on top of most stoves are not good enough to suck out strong smells.

If you're going to sear a steak, you'll have to close you bedroom doors and open your balcony door/window.
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Apr 23, 2006
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poorwingman wrote:
Feb 17th, 2019 3:31 pm
The other thing that's a huge pita in condo kitchens are that the microwave fan hood ranges on top of most stoves are not good enough to suck out strong smells.

If you're going to sear a steak, you'll have to close you bedroom doors and open your balcony door/window.
Yep, that's the biggest problem with my condo kitchen atm. The microwave fan hood is installed too low above the stove it does a poor job venting smoke from the outer elements. I thought about remodeling the kitchen so I could install a proper hood, but probably not worth the effort. And then I have to think about where to place the microwave.
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Jul 14, 2009
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civiclease wrote:
Feb 16th, 2019 4:44 am
Younger people today don’t tend to acquire masses of “stuff” as previous generations did. They spend their money (what little they have) on “experiences” - trips, restaurants, etc. Therefore living in a space deemed tiny by an older person is very realistic for them. Less clutter, smaller surface area to clean. And as someone above noted, small living quarters are very normal in Europe even amongst wealthy people.
European here. Not like this. Definitely not like this. We have apartments all over but small is like 100 m^2. Not going to deny, there ARE smaller units, even 40-50 m^2 but those people are genuinely poor. This doesn't hold true for Toronto. Those that live in those spaces are NOT poor.
Sr. Member
Jan 29, 2010
623 posts
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My sister in law lives in a 550 sq ft apartment in HK with her husband, 2 kids and a maid. The apartment’s value currently is CAD 1.4m. Every time I go up there, I fail to understand how they do it. They don’t have any of those foldable beds, foldable tables and stuff to maximise the spacing either. Everything’s just very compact and close together. One of the biggest reason why I wanted to leave HK is because unless your family’s rich (and many are), even with HK’s high salaries, you will end up in a shoebox and your kids will grow up in a shoebox.

As to this topic, I have seen so many small living areas (One of my relatives live in a 150 sq ft apartment in HK in a good location (on top of subway station) that cost like CAD 700k+) - where the toilet is below the shower and you can barely move in the washroom. So, yes, anything is possible.
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Apr 23, 2006
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jillaryit wrote:
Feb 17th, 2019 11:17 pm
My sister in law lives in a 550 sq ft apartment in HK with her husband, 2 kids and a maid. The apartment’s value currently is CAD 1.4m. Every time I go up there, I fail to understand how they do it. They don’t have any of those foldable beds, foldable tables and stuff to maximise the spacing either. Everything’s just very compact and close together. One of the biggest reason why I wanted to leave HK is because unless your family’s rich (and many are), even with HK’s high salaries, you will end up in a shoebox and your kids will grow up in a shoebox.
HK apartments also go by net space (total usable space excluding walls). A net 550sq ft apartment will probably be close to a 700 gross sq ft condo that you find here. It is quite common to see developers fitting 2 bed rooms in 700 sq ft condos here now, and in HK they can easily fit 3.
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Dec 30, 2012
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Toronto
mefromparadise wrote:
Feb 17th, 2019 8:15 pm
European here. Not like this. Definitely not like this. We have apartments all over but small is like 100 m^2. Not going to deny, there ARE smaller units, even 40-50 m^2 but those people are genuinely poor. This doesn't hold true for Toronto. Those that live in those spaces are NOT poor.
40-50 sq mt flats are perfectly normal for singles or even 20-something couples in Paris, and if you’re living in central Paris chances are you aren’t poor. Even if Paris is an extreme case, my experience in other cities in France, Germany, and the UK suggest that living quarters are smaller by North American standards.

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