Real Estate

How small is your condo?

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 8th, 2019 8:35 pm
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[OP]
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Feb 11, 2018
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Chickinvic wrote:
Feb 17th, 2019 12:20 pm
That would not work for me at all (I cook), but so many people just use their kitchens for "show" these days and don't even cook (or know how to cook). This would not work for anyone who actually likes to cook meals.
I couldn't agree more with you. In particular, the "know how to cook". I guess if it's not an app they don't know how to use it... ;)

I find it 'funny' that a certain generation are staying home with their folks and spend all this money on eating outside. I guess they forgot that eating outside on a regular basis is very expensive. Eating out compared to prepared food at home is easily 5-20 times more expensive, often less healthy and considering it is normally paid with after-tax dollars, it sure ain't cheap.

I think sometimes the way they see things is that they are already "in the hole" so digging themselves a little bit deeper doesn't really matter. I've seen that behavior among people who are mortgaged up to their underwear and live paycheque to paycheque. I guess for them it is a sort of escape.
"There is always a light at the end of the tunnel and sometimes it is not a train" - Jennifer O'neill (2002)
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Jul 4, 2006
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ak-47 wrote:
Feb 15th, 2019 5:58 pm
I can't imagine how people can cook with this type of stove top, which is now getting common in 400-500 sq ft units.
...
The other thing that's a huge pita in condo kitchens are that the microwave fan hood ranges on top of most stoves are not good enough to suck out strong smells.

If you're going to sear a steak, you'll have to close you bedroom doors and open your balcony door/window.
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Apr 23, 2006
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poorwingman wrote:
Feb 17th, 2019 3:31 pm
The other thing that's a huge pita in condo kitchens are that the microwave fan hood ranges on top of most stoves are not good enough to suck out strong smells.

If you're going to sear a steak, you'll have to close you bedroom doors and open your balcony door/window.
Yep, that's the biggest problem with my condo kitchen atm. The microwave fan hood is installed too low above the stove it does a poor job venting smoke from the outer elements. I thought about remodeling the kitchen so I could install a proper hood, but probably not worth the effort. And then I have to think about where to place the microwave.
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Jul 14, 2009
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Richmond Hill
civiclease wrote:
Feb 16th, 2019 4:44 am
Younger people today don’t tend to acquire masses of “stuff” as previous generations did. They spend their money (what little they have) on “experiences” - trips, restaurants, etc. Therefore living in a space deemed tiny by an older person is very realistic for them. Less clutter, smaller surface area to clean. And as someone above noted, small living quarters are very normal in Europe even amongst wealthy people.
European here. Not like this. Definitely not like this. We have apartments all over but small is like 100 m^2. Not going to deny, there ARE smaller units, even 40-50 m^2 but those people are genuinely poor. This doesn't hold true for Toronto. Those that live in those spaces are NOT poor.
Member
Jan 29, 2010
282 posts
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My sister in law lives in a 550 sq ft apartment in HK with her husband, 2 kids and a maid. The apartment’s value currently is CAD 1.4m. Every time I go up there, I fail to understand how they do it. They don’t have any of those foldable beds, foldable tables and stuff to maximise the spacing either. Everything’s just very compact and close together. One of the biggest reason why I wanted to leave HK is because unless your family’s rich (and many are), even with HK’s high salaries, you will end up in a shoebox and your kids will grow up in a shoebox.

As to this topic, I have seen so many small living areas (One of my relatives live in a 150 sq ft apartment in HK in a good location (on top of subway station) that cost like CAD 700k+) - where the toilet is below the shower and you can barely move in the washroom. So, yes, anything is possible.
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Apr 23, 2006
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jillaryit wrote:
Feb 17th, 2019 11:17 pm
My sister in law lives in a 550 sq ft apartment in HK with her husband, 2 kids and a maid. The apartment’s value currently is CAD 1.4m. Every time I go up there, I fail to understand how they do it. They don’t have any of those foldable beds, foldable tables and stuff to maximise the spacing either. Everything’s just very compact and close together. One of the biggest reason why I wanted to leave HK is because unless your family’s rich (and many are), even with HK’s high salaries, you will end up in a shoebox and your kids will grow up in a shoebox.
HK apartments also go by net space (total usable space excluding walls). A net 550sq ft apartment will probably be close to a 700 gross sq ft condo that you find here. It is quite common to see developers fitting 2 bed rooms in 700 sq ft condos here now, and in HK they can easily fit 3.
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Dec 30, 2012
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mefromparadise wrote:
Feb 17th, 2019 8:15 pm
European here. Not like this. Definitely not like this. We have apartments all over but small is like 100 m^2. Not going to deny, there ARE smaller units, even 40-50 m^2 but those people are genuinely poor. This doesn't hold true for Toronto. Those that live in those spaces are NOT poor.
40-50 sq mt flats are perfectly normal for singles or even 20-something couples in Paris, and if you’re living in central Paris chances are you aren’t poor. Even if Paris is an extreme case, my experience in other cities in France, Germany, and the UK suggest that living quarters are smaller by North American standards.
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jillaryit wrote:
Feb 17th, 2019 11:17 pm
My sister in law lives in a 550 sq ft apartment in HK with her husband, 2 kids and a maid. The apartment’s value currently is CAD 1.4m. Every time I go up there, I fail to understand how they do it. They don’t have any of those foldable beds, foldable tables and stuff to maximise the spacing either. Everything’s just very compact and close together. One of the biggest reason why I wanted to leave HK is because unless your family’s rich (and many are), even with HK’s high salaries, you will end up in a shoebox and your kids will grow up in a shoebox.

As to this topic, I have seen so many small living areas (One of my relatives live in a 150 sq ft apartment in HK in a good location (on top of subway station) that cost like CAD 700k+) - where the toilet is below the shower and you can barely move in the washroom. So, yes, anything is possible.
And people wonder why Chinese come here and overpay. The real estate here looks like a bloody bargain when you're paying $1.4M for a 500sqft condo.
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Oct 13, 2006
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800 sq ft 2bd/2bath condo, single professional. If and when I move it will likely be into another condo about 900 sq ft 2bd/2bath + den. Having a second bathroom is a must for me for guests and i'd like to have a more dedicated space for an office as currently its in my 2nd bedroom.
Newbie
Feb 24, 2018
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First rule of real estate - location, location, location.

Almost all the high paying jobs are in the core, and they will continue to concentrate there for the forseeable future. It's where young professionals want to live. Entertainment is all downtown. Sports venues, nightlife, restaurants, concerts, etc. Downtown. City investment in infrastructure is also concentrated downtown.

Traffic coming into/out of the city, and therefore commute times will continue to get worse. There does not seem to be a solution as of yet.

Really, the writing is on the wall. The future is downtown. If you own a detached in around downtown, then all the power to you. But otherwise, if you have a detached more than 30 minutes out, you might as well buy land in Manitoba.
Sr. Member
Jul 21, 2009
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Toronto
Going from my parents 3200 sqft house to 640 sqft condo downtown to now 1400 sqft townhouse I can say people are pretty amazing at adapting to their living situations. I felt perfectly comfortable in the condo and think 600-800 sqft is a perfect size for a couple.

Entertaining and inviting people over is definitely more challenging in a small space but if you're in a space that small there are probably lots of restaurants for you to gather at. I do miss the big garage spaces that come with larger homes and would love a larger garage attached to a smaller house but those are hard to find.
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Feb 7, 2005
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I use to live in a 400 sq. ft. (20'x20') loft with tons of light when I was single. Tiny kitchenette and small bathroom with shower, toilet and sink. It was awesome and perfect.
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StatsGuy wrote:
Feb 15th, 2019 9:44 am
What do you need in a home office? A laptop and a mouse? Maybe a printer? with everything portable on a screen now , office can be anywhere

Home theater? Condos have those , why clutter house with a treadmill and elliptical? Just goto gym downstairs in a condo. Need quiet place to work? Goto the library/study in a condo

What's the difference between a home office and library/study? Curious

I can see how having kids would require more space though I think anything 800sqft or so is enough for one kid. Def not the 2600 sqft suburb model. In older gens when people had more kids, homes were around the 1000sqft range even for detached .
Thats and driving anything less than a awd suv is considered child abuse these days lol
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Sep 13, 2005
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StatsGuy wrote:
Feb 15th, 2019 9:44 am
What do you need in a home office? A laptop and a mouse? Maybe a printer? with everything portable on a screen now , office can be anywhere

Home theater? Condos have those , why clutter house with a treadmill and elliptical? Just goto gym downstairs in a condo. Need quiet place to work? Goto the library/study in a condo

What's the difference between a home office and library/study? Curious

I can see how having kids would require more space though I think anything 800sqft or so is enough for one kid. Def not the 2600 sqft suburb model. In older gens when people had more kids, homes were around the 1000sqft range even for detached .
I want a home office because I work with sensitive and private information. I cannot be out in public and working since the information may be leaked by people looking at my screen, unsecured internet etc. I like a full desk, with nice chair, monitor, keyboard, mouse etc because I am more productive that way. Yes, you can work anywhere but I am more productive in a comfortable setting for me. I work with a lot of data so staring at a small laptop screen will not cut it for me. I need a monitor, a big one too.

I like my study/library because it's my "me" area. I don't work there and it's just for me to do things I really enjoy, personal aspect of me. I don't need a segregated space like this but since we have the space why not enjoy it.
TomLafinsky wrote:
Feb 17th, 2019 12:42 pm

I couldn't agree more with you. In particular, the "know how to cook". I guess if it's not an app they don't know how to use it... ;)

I find it 'funny' that a certain generation are staying home with their folks and spend all this money on eating outside. I guess they forgot that eating outside on a regular basis is very expensive. Eating out compared to prepared food at home is easily 5-20 times more expensive, often less healthy and considering it is normally paid with after-tax dollars, it sure ain't cheap.

I think sometimes the way they see things is that they are already "in the hole" so digging themselves a little bit deeper doesn't really matter. I've seen that behavior among people who are mortgaged up to their underwear and live paycheque to paycheque. I guess for them it is a sort of escape.
Why are you so judgmental? People choose their lifestyles that suits them and makes them happy but no need to assume people that choose them are in a negative position or "in the hole" so to speak. People that don't cook doesn't mean they can't afford it or eating incredibly unhealthy as well. I am sure there are lots of people like me that eat out a lot because of variety of reasons. I never enjoyed cooking but love eating. So I pay someone else to cook me delicious meals. I'm ok paying the premium for it. It's MY lifestyle choice and many others. It may put a dent to YOUR budget but I am pretty sure there are many people that can easily afford eating out on a daily basis. I bet you're one of those people that judge people like me that buy lunch at work everyday. I'm well aware of those "types" of people.

Curious, what is your opinion on people that hire cleaners? Is it as harsh?

To answer your original question. Easy, I lived a simple life. I wasn't home much since I always had something to do and didn't cook cause I hate cooking. You also tend to hoard less too like single piece of furniture is multi functional etc.
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May 6, 2013
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Sanyo wrote:
Feb 15th, 2019 8:49 pm
Agreed a 500 sq ft condo is meant for a young professional, not a family.

Considering millennials these days they pretty much eat almost every meal out now.... so whats the use of a kitchen even?
Speak for yourself, both my wife and I are young professionals and we cook at least 6 times per week. This setup would never work even for some of the most basic meals. Eating out is generally way less healthy than a home cooked meal.

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