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how windy is too windy for airplanes

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  • Jun 17th, 2018 6:48 pm
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how windy is too windy for airplanes

Anyone know what westjet's limits are, tomorrow im flying from deer lake, its calling for 30 gusting to 60. do you think they will land and take off in that wind?
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Feb 22, 2016
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rocking23nf wrote: Anyone know what westjet's limits are, tomorrow im flying from deer lake, its calling for 30 gusting to 60. do you think they will land and take off in that wind?
They can fly through that no problem. I didn't think WestJet flies you in Cessnas :-)
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Que Sera, Sera!

rocking23nf wrote: Anyone know what westjet's limits are, tomorrow im flying from deer lake, its calling for 30 gusting to 60. do you think they will land and take off in that wind?
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Jan 12, 2015
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Flights would be grounded daily in the Prairies if they didn’t fly in 30-60 gust winds.

So yes not a problem to take off or land. Smaller planes may make for a bumpy ride if turbulence is great.
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Jun 15, 2015
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For comparison's sake Pearson only issued a ground stop when the wind gusts approached 100km/hr during the May 4 windstorm.
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Anybody actually look forward to turbulence on airplanes? Makes you sit up in your seat with anticipation and excitement.
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Flights will continue without much issue. Takeoffs may be delayed slightly to allow cross winds to die off, and there may be a few more go arounds or extra circling waiting for cross winds to die down, but operations won't be greatly impacted by those winds.

Not all winds are the same either. A cross wind is very different than a head wind. The 737-800 is rated for a maximum cross wind of about 60 km/hr on a dry runway. If the runway is wet it would be a bit less. That can change slightly based on the airport as well. The airline itself also has its own rules, and I'm not sure what Westjet's policies are.

In theory, a plane could take off with a 100 km/hr head wind, although it would never happen. The 737-800 is rated for a tail wind of around 20-25 km/hr, but it's easy to avoid a tail wind by taking off in the other direction.

More so than the ability of the plane is the rules regarding the opening of doors. Those standards are more restrictive than the abilities of the plane.

Either way, those winds aren't anything to worry about. It might modify slightly the actions of specific flights, but it won't have much of an effect on the overall operations.
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abdulsong wrote: Anybody actually look forward to turbulence on airplanes? Makes you sit up in your seat with anticipation and excitement.
What's wrong with you?
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May 10, 2005
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The wind and gust limits are all different depending on type of aircraft, aircraft weight and direction of the wind and gusts. Gusting crosswinds can be very dangerous.
I believe that the aircraft you will be on is a Q400 and they can get thrown around a bit. It will be bumpy for sure but I think they will fly.
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Anybody actually look forward to turbulence on airplanes? Makes you sit up in your seat with anticipation and excitement.
13inches wrote: What's wrong with you?
I'm a sailplane pilot, and turbulence caused by columns of rising air (thermals) is what we live for. There's nothing like hitting a massive updraft and climbing thousands of feet in a tight turn without needing an engine.

Image
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retrothing wrote: I'm a sailplane pilot, and turbulence caused by columns of rising air (thermals) is what we live for. There's nothing like hitting a massive updraft and climbing thousands of feet in a tight turn without needing an engine.
If you are a pilot than you know turbulence is not solely "caused by columns of rising air". There are storms, there are mountains, there are air currents, clouds and more .
You should also know that gusts and high winds are not conducive to good flights. You as a sailplane pilot should know that you are are far more susceptible to the effects of crosswinds and high winds.
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Pete_Coach wrote: If you are a pilot than you know turbulence is not solely "caused by columns of rising air". There are storms, there are mountains, there are air currents, clouds and more .
You should also know that gusts and high winds are not conducive to good flights. You as a sailplane pilot should know that you are are far more susceptible to the effects of crosswinds and high winds.
....well... internet is the place to meet so many different people,
with so many different strange phobias and philias...

...abdulsong is the first person I meet in internet who loves turbulence....

...I am the second...
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As an Air Traffic Controller in NL I can tell you that wind definitely has an impact but it is only one part of the equation. We routinely see planes land and takeoff in wind gusts exceeding 40 KTS but it really depends on other weather conditions such as rain and cross winds. If the weather is poor, it's more likely the plane won't get in to begin with thus no outbound flight. Rain and high cross winds are more likely to impact a flight then simple wind strength.
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retrothing wrote: I'm a sailplane pilot, and turbulence caused by columns of rising air (thermals) is what we live for. There's nothing like hitting a massive updraft and climbing thousands of feet in a tight turn without needing an engine.
I'm in the Windermere Valley, home to many of the early hang gliding records. It's a Mecca for gliders, too. I went up for my birthday around 10 years ago. I had the pilot fly us over our place, since we own a piece of Mt. Swansea, where most guys go to catch the thermals and the hang gliders and para gliders launch. The thermals were very tight that day. It seemed like one wing was pinned and we just spiralled up around it. As we caught or fell out of the thermal, we gained or lost 100 feet per second. That's 10 stories up or down per second! It was nauseating! I asked the pilot if many people got sick and he just yelled "The sickness bags are in the pouch!" I didn't puke, but I certainly could have. When we landed, the first thing the tow pilot asked was "Did you puke?" I said no and he said good, because "Most people do, and I have another tow and I'd have to clean it!" Once we got back down, after 2 hours of flying, it was like I just stepped off a ship after a month at sea.
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Jun 9, 2018
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13inches wrote: What's wrong with you?
Why do people ride roller coasters? Why do test pilots love their jobs?
I'd pay $$$ to be on this flight.

[OP]
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no issues in deer lake today, but we had a 1 hour delay in Toronto after we already boarded due to the thunderstorm which sucked. pretty smooth flight otherwise.
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Pete_Coach wrote: If you are a pilot than you know turbulence is not solely "caused by columns of rising air". There are storms, there are mountains, there are air currents, clouds and more .
You should also know that gusts and high winds are not conducive to good flights. You as a sailplane pilot should know that you are are far more susceptible to the effects of crosswinds and high winds.
Huh? I was responding directly to the comment from the member who said that they enjoy turbulence. I absolutely love convective turbulence in the right aircraft because it's a lot of fun. Period.

CAT (clear air turbulence) is not nearly as enjoyable. However, it's something you'll encounter at altitude because of wind sheer, t-storms, and in cirrus or lenticular clouds. Around the airport, I'd be more concerned about microburts or aircraft wake turbulence caused by an A332 or B738 on departure or final than a moderate crosswind.
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retrothing wrote: Huh? I was responding directly to the comment from the member who said that they enjoy turbulence. I absolutely love convective turbulence in the right aircraft because it's a lot of fun. Period.

CAT (clear air turbulence) is not nearly as enjoyable. However, it's something you'll encounter at altitude because of wind sheer, t-storms, and in cirrus or lenticular clouds. Around the airport, I'd be more concerned about microburts or aircraft wake turbulence caused by an A332 or B738 on departure or final than a moderate crosswind.
Huh? I will tell you. I responded to your , "I am a sailplane pilot"and.... "turbulence caused by columns of rising air "comment. I dd not even mention clear air turbulence, which is a different phenomenon than weather related and would be encountered at most airports on landing and take off.
Microbursts are violent storm related and as near as I can understand, no A332 or A380 has ever landed at Deer Lake.
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abdulsong wrote: Why do people ride roller coasters? Why do test pilots love their jobs?
I'd pay $$$ to be on this flight.

That video makes the climb look more extreme than it really is. Without looking up the max specifications for the plane, my guess is that climb is anywhere from 25-30 degrees, which is a lot compared to what you'd feel as a typical passenger, but still far short of near vertical. It would be neat to experience that on such a large plane though, I agree.

If you're anywhere near Ottawa, check this out. It's an amazing experience
https://www.goxpr.com/products/aerobatic-flight
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Pete_Coach wrote: Huh? I will tell you. I responded to your , "I am a sailplane pilot"and.... "turbulence caused by columns of rising air "comment.
You're misreading my original comment. I didn't claim that all turbulence is convective, not did I state that I was just a sailplane pilot. All I said was that I enjoy thermalling in response to someone who asked "Anybody actually look forward to turbulence?"

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