Automotive

Hyundai/Kia deny recalls due to oil change frequency

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  • Dec 11th, 2019 12:42 pm
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Sep 1, 2004
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Hyundai/Kia deny recalls due to oil change frequency

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british- ... -1.5382373
After getting the recall notice, Lingard submitted his receipts to Hyundai Canada. It rejected the claim, saying his first engine failure was due to "insufficient engine maintenance, not the recall" because Lingard didn't do sufficiently frequent oil changes prior to 100,000 kilometres of driving, and didn't provide receipts for subsequent changes.
RFD Korean haters are coming.....
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He had 2 engines fail! One used engine cost 7k!

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Would you buy a Hyundai???
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I hope we all can agree that Hyundai needs to communicate recalls to customers faster. The recall in question "was issued in February, but the notice didn't arrive in the mail until August".

By the time the customers calls the dealer to make an appointment, the engine already blew up.

I think they need to explain why is taking so long to notify the customers that are affected.
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Xtrema wrote: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british- ... -1.5382373



RFD Korean haters are coming.....
Sad part is that the owner didn't keep records of oil changes and wasn't done at the dealer or when it was it was few and far between. Manufacture 'could' be right in the case but shit, it's only 1 extra motor, just do it for the right reasons.
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cheapmeister wrote: He had 2 engines fail! One used engine cost 7k!
I think the used engine would have cost less that $4K from a wrecker, the balance of the $7K being installation + tax.

But true, risky move spending significant money on a used engine of unknown heritage with 40K kms on it, Korean or not.

Hyundai/Kia clearly have a problem with his recall, but could possibly have some justification in denying a claim if the owner ignored the 12K km OCI and went with 20K.
Even if the Tucson engine had a very large oil capacity (which it doesn't) and above-average oil filtration, 16K would have been pushing it - even without assembly debris/shavings present.
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macnut wrote: I think the used engine would have cost less that $4K from a wrecker, the balance of the $7K being installation + tax.

But true, risky move spending significant money on a used engine of unknown heritage with 40K kms on it, Korean or not.

Hyundai/Kia clearly have a problem with his recall, but could possibly have some justification in denying a claim if the owner ignored the 12K km OCI and went with 20K.
Even if the Tucson engine had a very large oil capacity (which it doesn't) and above-average oil filtration, 16K would have been pushing it - even without assembly debris/shavings present.
my TDI is 15k oil change...my old 1 ton duramax said 7k oil changes..i did at 15k (dino oil..drove to over 800k km))...never an issue..still on the road at 1.2 mil..you are saying a missed oil change on a newer car would cause this?..must be a hyundai thing
[OP]
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georgecantstandya wrote: Putting me off considering the 2020 Sonata.
You shouldn't anyway until the more potent N-Line is released.

Also, even the middle range 1.6T tops out at $33K USD. Hate to see what's N-Line is with 2.5T is going to cost.
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cardguy wrote: my TDI is 15k oil change...my old 1 ton duramax said 7k oil changes..i did at 15k (dino oil..drove to over 800k km))...never an issue..still on the road at 1.2 mil..you are saying a missed oil change on a newer car would cause this?..must be a hyundai thing
If anything, they are pretty much like insurance companies trying to find loopholes to get out of paying. This is why following what's stated in the owner's manual is crucial if you want any sort of support from manufacturers.
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Dec 21, 2013
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Since many people don't bother reading articles, here's the synopsis:
In June, Rick Lingard's 2011 Hyundai Tucson's engine seized and died while he was driving down a major highway near Cranbrook, B.C.

He paid more than $7,000 to replace it, opting for a used engine with 40,000 kilometres on it, through an independent mechanic, after a Hyundai dealership quoted him more than $10,000 for a new one.
A few weeks later, it happened again. "The same kind of high-pitched rattle-y sound … and then all the lights came on again and — boom! I was in disbelief,"

Then, another twist: Just three days after the second catastrophic engine failure, Lingard got a recall notice describing the same problem.

The recall was issued in February, but the notice didn't arrive in the mail until August. Lingard says no one at two Hyundai dealerships he'd contacted about his engine breakdowns mentioned anything about a recall.
So let's get it straight.. A recall was issued by Hyundai for his [supposed] issue in February, but it didn't "arrive in the mail" until August? Snail mail ain't that slow..

Engine #1 blows in June... dealership doesn't tell him about the recall and wants $10K. He opts for a used engine from a private mechanic for $7K.. only to have it happen to him again a few weeks later.

This is like watching Final Destination .. the auto edition.

Unreal.
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Disasters just driving down the road.
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motomondo wrote: I hope we all can agree that Hyundai needs to communicate recalls to customers faster. The recall in question "was issued in February, but the notice didn't arrive in the mail until August".
By the time the customers calls the dealer to make an appointment, the engine already blew up.
I think they need to explain why is taking so long to notify the customers that are affected.
Bad on Hyundai for not telling him about the issues. These have been known since at least Dec 2017.
The guy didn't help himself though. A quick good search would have brought up the known issues and recalls. His mechanic could also have told him this.
You can't trust any company, so you should do everything you can to protect yourself.
koffey wrote: Sad part is that the owner didn't keep records of oil changes and wasn't done at the dealer or when it was it was few and far between. Manufacture 'could' be right in the case but shit, it's only 1 extra motor, just do it for the right reasons.
I believe he could have sued for the repair, and Hyundai/Kia would have to prove that the long oil changed caused the issue. However, given it's a oil related issue, it might be hard. If they found the shavings from the recall, it could be proved that a longer change didn't cause it.
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Canada is a small market for automobile companies compared to United States, so they don't really care about us, especially Hyundai. Hyundai Canada warranty is 5 yr for most things except 8 yr for major emissions and hybrid system , whereas Hyundai USA extends it to 10 yr for powertrain and lifetime for hybrid/electric battery warranty.
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Bull Dog wrote: Canada is a small market for automobile companies compared to United States, so they don't really care about us, especially Hyundai. Hyundai Canada warranty is 5 yr for most things except 8 yr for major emissions and hybrid system , whereas Hyundai USA extends it to 10 yr for powertrain and lifetime for hybrid/electric battery warranty.
This + consumer protection laws differ across the border with our framework generally not as consumer-friendly as it is in the USA.
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Sep 13, 2012
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koffey wrote: Sad part is that the owner didn't keep records of oil changes and wasn't done at the dealer or when it was it was few and far between. Manufacture 'could' be right in the case but shit, it's only 1 extra motor, just do it for the right reasons.
Oil changes don’t have to be done at the dealership to maintain warranty coverage.
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Is this one instance where using the services of an oil testing lab would have paid off?

I know some on RFD think it's a waste of money, and I have never had oil tested myself, but what about doing it just the one time for a new car, say at 5K kms or something?
cardguy wrote: my TDI is 15k oil change...my old 1 ton duramax said 7k oil changes..i did at 15k (dino oil..drove to over 800k km))...never an issue..still on the road at 1.2 mil..you are saying a missed oil change on a newer car would cause this?..must be a hyundai thing
Your TDI has a 25% larger oil capacity than the Hyundai/Kia 4 cyl. engine in question. More oil circulating tends to allow longer change intervals as a general rule, diesel nothwithstanding.

I wasn't saying 1 missed oil change was catastrophic. The story states that he went with 20K km oil changes after he stopped using dealership service. That's a bit different than 1 missed change.

On a side note, I think it's true that the only way a hole can be blown through an engine is if the connecting rod breaks, as that is where there is tremendous force.
And for that to happen, one or more crankshaft bearings have to give way.
Usually that would give a low-pitched rumble yet the owners all reported a high-pitch rattle.
The absence of any prior warning signs, such as blue smoke out the tail pipe, or low oil level, is surprising.
But owners who haven't experienced the failure yet, and can't get dealership action on the recall, would do well to look for clues and take appropriate action.

What about the old upsell of an 'engine flush' with an oil change that got largely discredited? Wouldn't that be one way to minimize the risk of those left-over factory shavings?
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100Pacer wrote: Oil changes don’t have to be done at the dealership to maintain warranty coverage.
Yes. But you need to be able to show that you actually did them or had somebody do it for you. So no paperwork = no proof that the oil changes were really done.

In the case in the article, the guy couldn’t provide Hyundai with proof since he didn’t keep good records. They weren’t willing to just take his word for it and comp him thousands for the new engine.

Bottom line get your oil changed wherever you want but you need to keep records!
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CanadianLurker wrote: Yes. But you need to be able to show that you actually did them or had somebody do it for you. So no paperwork = no proof that the oil changes were really done.

In the case in the article, the guy couldn’t provide Hyundai with proof since he didn’t keep good records. They weren’t willing to just take his word for it and comp him thousands for the new engine.

Bottom line get your oil changed wherever you want but you need to keep records!
Isn’t that a given?

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