Computers & Electronics

I accidentally wiped my NAS

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  • Jan 3rd, 2021 6:37 pm
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Nov 21, 2002
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EugW wrote: RAID1 is not a backup. If he wiped the directory, normally the directory on both drives would be wiped.
that's why I mirror vs raid....
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May 12, 2014
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lead wrote: that's why I mirror vs raid....
Mirror can work for a 2 drive setup. But beyond that you surely don't want to waste half your drives.

And mirror won't solve fire, theft, crypto locker, etc.
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Mar 23, 2009
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lead wrote: that's why I mirror vs raid....
RAID1 is mirror. And again, that is not a backup. If you delete a directory, it is deleted on both drives. That doesn’t help.

The point is you need a proper backup that is not part of the RAID.
FrancisBacon wrote: Mirror can work for a 2 drive setup. But beyond that you surely don't want to waste half your drives.

And mirror won't solve fire, theft, crypto locker, etc.
Mirror doesn’t solve deleting a directory either, which is the original poster’s problem.
Penalty Box
Mar 23, 2004
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kramer1 wrote: I would suggest calling a local IT pro.
Nahh, this is the perfect, perfect time to go and ask all those guys that claim they have to drill holes in their HDDs, etc. before they get rid of them and would never sell them or donate them because "wiping never gets rid of things and can still be recovered easily", etc. :rolleyes: Not to mention pretending their self-important asses have data that anyone would even want to recover in the first place :rolleyes:

Because surely those tin foil hatters will show you just how easy it all is :lol:

While there may be the possibility of recovering things depending on how the drives were "accidentally wiped" and how they were setup originally, what always gets me is how those folks always proclaim data recovery is so easy a 2yr old could do it and a few passes of DBAN is no sweat for data recovery. Then you call on them to actually recover something, 'cause you know, it's so easy and they'll be nowhere to be found, just like the data!
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May 15, 2016
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trane0 wrote: No offense, but the ability undelete files is a product of luck with FAT32/NTFS file systems and in no way a feature that was built in to these technologies, so not at all "common sense". You have to get lucky that the blocks that made up your deleted files weren't corrupted or overwritten in any way, which on an active server is only a matter of time before those blocks are gone and the underlying files are not recoverable.

  • You don't know if you have backups? That kind of sums up this thread in a nutshell.
  • Did you enable the recycling bin feature on the share you deleted the files from? This is a Synology DSM feature and is not turned on by default.

Here's the process for undeleting files from an RAID1 / ext4 volume. Since you haven't advised what kind of RAID and what kind of file system your NAS is using, or even what model/version of Synology DSM, I'm assuming it's the default. If it's anything else, the process is probably different.

1) Backup your important data on your NAS
2) Remove 1 of the disks from the NAS and attach it to a computer
3) Boot the computer with an Ubuntu live cd (or alternatively something like sysrescuecd which has extundelete installed already)
4) Mount the drive with mdadm
5) Install the extundelete package
6) Run extundelete to recover your deleted files. Maybe even recover these files to a different drive as a precaution. Up to you.
If I enable recycle bin would it help if I mirrored my usb files to the nas? According to synology rep, even if I have it enable would not catch the files.
FrancisBacon wrote: If you don't know what snapshots are you don't have them (needs to be set up).

Backups are a copy of your data. Do you have a copy?


If your data is of little value, just consider it lost. Start over from scratch setting up your NAS.

If it's high value, and you have copies, start over from scratch setting up your NAS.


If it's high value and you have no copies, stop touching your NAS. You will need professional (paid) help to recover the data if it's even possible. It unfortunately doesn't appear that you'll be able to do it yourself, if it's even possible.

And if you try yourself it's very possible that you'll make things worse.



This will not help right now, but to avoid data loss in the future: set up SHR1, use BTRFS with error correction, set up scrubbing every 3 months, set up snapshots, set up hyperbackup to Backblaze every night.
ES_Revenge wrote: Nahh, this is the perfect, perfect time to go and ask all those guys that claim they have to drill holes in their HDDs, etc. before they get rid of them and would never sell them or donate them because "wiping never gets rid of things and can still be recovered easily", etc. :rolleyes: Not to mention pretending their self-important asses have data that anyone would even want to recover in the first place :rolleyes:

Because surely those tin foil hatters will show you just how easy it all is :lol:

While there may be the possibility of recovering things depending on how the drives were "accidentally wiped" and how they were setup originally, what always gets me is how those folks always proclaim data recovery is so easy a 2yr old could do it and a few passes of DBAN is no sweat for data recovery. Then you call on them to actually recover something, 'cause you know, it's so easy and they'll be nowhere to be found, just like the data!
Is there a guide for this? I'm a complete newbie.
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May 12, 2014
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vivibaby wrote: If I enable recycle bin would it help if I mirrored my usb files to the nas? According to synology rep, even if I have it enable would not catch the files.
...
Is there a guide for this? I'm a complete newbie.
I don't think the recycle bin would have helped. Maybe snapshots wouldn't have helped either, I'm still not sure what USB copy did in your case.

The only thing that would have helped is a daily backup.

I don't think there's an exact guide for my recommendations, they're the product of lots of reading.

But there are lots of guide that spell out how to do each part individually. (You should probably follow those guides because they'll help you understand/set up other stuff along the way)
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May 15, 2016
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FrancisBacon wrote: I don't think the recycle bin would have helped. Maybe snapshots wouldn't have helped either, I'm still not sure what USB copy did in your case.

The only thing that would have helped is a daily backup.

I don't think there's an exact guide for my recommendations, they're the product of lots of reading.

But there are lots of guide that spell out how to do each part individually. (You should probably follow those guides because they'll help you understand/set up other stuff along the way)
Correct me if I'm wrong:
I went into my NAS and I have SHR enabled. Is that the same as SHR1?
BTRFS should be default synology setting? Does it come with error correction enabled?
Scrubbing is done to prvent data rot. The last time it was scrubbed was a year ago. Will it detect rot based on the files present during last scrub or can it detect using first scrub?
Snapshots and Hyperbackup are apps? Is there a reason to choose one over the other?

Thanks.
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May 12, 2014
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vivibaby wrote: I went into my NAS and I have SHR enabled. Is that the same as SHR1?
BTRFS should be default synology setting? Does it come with error correction enabled?
Scrubbing is done to prvent data rot. The last time it was scrubbed was a year ago. Will it detect rot based on the files present during last scrub or can it detect using first scrub?
Snapshots and Hyperbackup are apps? Is there a reason to choose one over the other?
You should stop using your NAS. Every minute that it's on, background processes are writing to disc and making recovery harder. Unless you've accepted that you're going to start from scratch.


I think you can have SHR even with only one disc (ie no fault tolerance, but system is ready to accept future discs). SHR 1 means you can lose 1 disc no problem. SHR 2 means you can lose 2.


Don't remember if BTRFS is the default, I think you have to chose (ext4 vs BTRFS).

Scrubbing detects (not prevents) rot. BTRFS with SHR 1 will fix the rot. This will not help if the files are overwritten "on purpose" (your case).

Snapshots service and hyperbackup are both apps. They serve different purposes. I think users should use both.
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Apr 29, 2018
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ES_Revenge wrote: Nahh, this is the perfect, perfect time to go and ask all those guys that claim they have to drill holes in their HDDs, etc. before they get rid of them and would never sell them or donate them because "wiping never gets rid of things and can still be recovered easily", etc. :rolleyes: Not to mention pretending their self-important asses have data that anyone would even want to recover in the first place :rolleyes:

Because surely those tin foil hatters will show you just how easy it all is :lol:

While there may be the possibility of recovering things depending on how the drives were "accidentally wiped" and how they were setup originally, what always gets me is how those folks always proclaim data recovery is so easy a 2yr old could do it and a few passes of DBAN is no sweat for data recovery. Then you call on them to actually recover something, 'cause you know, it's so easy and they'll be nowhere to be found, just like the data!
Well we (or they) don't owe you anything without payment, and I have recovered my data several times. Being a poor kid means you don't have the luxury of backups. It ain't easy but it can be done. and it is very highly unlikely that a single program will magically recover all your data
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