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I have a Dream Job in mind, how should I work towards it?

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  • Jul 13th, 2012 10:03 pm
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[OP]
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Jul 1, 2012
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Orillia

I have a Dream Job in mind, how should I work towards it?

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May 22, 2005
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Good Morning
You're in your first year of studies, I wouldn't worry about summer internships til next year, as 1st year students rarely ever get internships. Of course, some people do, good for them.


Perhaps look into getting a job at Shoppers Drug Mart in the cosmetics section? I knew someone who worked just seasonal at SDM for her whole undergrad. There are SDMs everywhere, so that's an entry level start.
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Aug 10, 2011
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Get a LinkedIn account.

Put some effort into filling it up.

Join some marketing "Groups". Participate in discussions in the Group forums (<-- writing skills come in handy).

Make some connections.

Also... let as many people you know as possible that you are looking for an opportunity in marketing.

I helped a friend get a job in marketing when she graduated even though I'm in accounting. You never know who might know someone somewhere who is looking to hire.
:confused:
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This may be a long shot, but worth a try.

1. Join LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com)
2. Once you have an account, join their LinkedIn group (search by Company name)
3. Follow the company
4. When a post is made by the company, reply to it and show your deep interest in the company. Eventually ask how you should go abouts finding internship opportunities. The key here is show your motivation (dream job).
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Oct 7, 2010
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coriolis wrote: You're in your first year of studies, I wouldn't worry about summer internships til next year, as 1st year students rarely ever get internships. Of course, some people do, good for them.


Perhaps look into getting a job at Shoppers Drug Mart in the cosmetics section? I knew someone who worked just seasonal at SDM for her whole undergrad. There are SDMs everywhere, so that's an entry level start.
According to the successful businessmen/finance guys on RFD (you know who they are, always bragging on here). Not being able to get an meaningful internship on their 1st year, she is already behind. If OP wants to be an average person with average job, then she is on the right track. People who want Dream Jobs (aka high paying, fast growing, exciting jobs) are already working on it already instead of dreaming about it.

This is what they said

1st year intern, at some regular small company hooked up by parents/relatives etc
2nd year intern, at a middle level corporation (due to experience gain in 1st year)
3rd year intern, at a high level corporation
Got a job before graduating, because already got their foot in the door.
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Feb 16, 2010
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Making a LinkedIn account and randomly adding people = useless + waste of time

How to use LinkedIn properly:

1) Have a networking meet with the person
2) Add them so it refreshes their memory of who you are
3) Keep in touch through LinkedIn/Email/Phone

Noticed alot of Uni students these days adding random people on LinkedIn even when they are complete strangers...what's the point of that?

It's not Facebook
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post a picture of yourself and let rfd judge
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HTTP04 wrote: Noticed alot of Uni students these days adding random people on LinkedIn even when they are complete strangers...what's the point of that?
Not sure how true this is for university students, but as someone that always has a job, I frequently get spammed by recruiters asking me to join their companies. My guess is that if these students were somehow connected via the random people they add to recruiters, they might get contacted. Again, not sure if this actually works.

What actually might be a lot more useful is to find people (preferably in a role you're interested in) at some of these companies and start a conversation with them rather than just randomly adding them. You'll learn more about the job, and if they like you, might even offer you an internship. I suspect you'll have to go through a whole bunch of people for something like this.
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Some good advice here but also lots of fluff. Honestly, LinkedIn is nice but it's not a go-to tool. Most people I know in a position to hire anyone don't bother with LinkedIn. Or when they do, it's only to keep a list of contacts and nothing more.

From the limited information I know of the industry (a friend who is Head Marketing Manager for one of L'Oreal's products in Germany), I'll only chip in my 2 cents. Nothing that can help you actually find the job but tips on how to increase your chances/odds. Sorry for the unstructured thoughts but no time today to formulate a coherent thought process.

- There are many French firms that dominate this field, meaning management level is usually French. Knowing French will definitely help your cause.
- Marketing is a broad term. Do you want to do front-line work or more back-office? In either case, you need "field experience" and front-line experience will help your cause. The SDM suggestion is a good one.
- Writing good is one thing. How's your interaction with people? The creative and writing stuff is most of the time outsourced to 3rd parties. What you need it to have good interpersonal skills and business acumen.
- Figure out what functional role you'd like to play in a cosmetic firm as there are endless number of roles that you can play.
- Contacting people is important. And not just virtually.
- Skip their HR Marketing all together. They are only a screen and cannot secure you anything. People you need to talk to are in the operational business if you want to be in Sales/Marketing/Strategy.
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Nyte wrote: Not sure how true this is for university students, but as someone that always has a job, I frequently get spammed by recruiters asking me to join their companies. My guess is that if these students were somehow connected via the random people they add to recruiters, they might get contacted. Again, not sure if this actually works.

What actually might be a lot more useful is to find people (preferably in a role you're interested in) at some of these companies and start a conversation with them rather than just randomly adding them. You'll learn more about the job, and if they like you, might even offer you an internship. I suspect you'll have to go through a whole bunch of people for something like this.
Recruiters have contacted you because you're employed and have sufficient experience for them to "flip" you. Recruiters will not bother with uni students unless they are recruiters in specialized fields that look for very specific profiles.

But you're right about the contacts and making conversation. Funny -- I randomly met an American chemical engineering student on the train a few days ago. He just made some conversation with me as he noticed something I was reading. Turns out what he's studying is the profile our company needs. I gave him my card and asked him to call me next year when he's finished with uni. If his grades are good enough and have the ambitious drive, hey, maybe we will even hire and relocate him from Florida to Europe. Honestly, it's difficult to find good people these days. Even during a short conversation, you can usually learn a lot about the person.
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Swinky,
Think big picture. The blog idea is a good one. If you get good enough and build enough credibility that will give you a leg up on other applicants. Instead of shoppers, why not apply to a makeup counter at sears or the bay? Not to slight SDM, but a large part of makeup marketing is brand. Shoppers is a drugstore. Department store on the resume looks classier. Research now what kind of positions are open, what experience and education is required. Contact the companies you're interested in and ASK. Build the network now with the HR ppl at these companies. I suspect you will see great competition for jobs in marketing and advertising. Accounting or finance positions less-so. You have volunteer experience, but make it RELEVANT experience. Talk to your hair stylist and ask if she knows any hair shows going on in the city and if they're looking for volunteer makeup artists.
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May 2, 2012
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Yep, cosmetics counter at a drug store or department store would be good experience.

Blog about cosmetics, even if you have low readership. Keep it professional. You don't need Jezebel (lol, feminist sites blogging about makeup) to start writing. This is the internet, there are no gatekeepers. Consider Youtube, since every company is looking for fresh faces in new media. Review products, blog about press releases, that kind of thing. Do your reading! Someone else could tell you which marketing books are in vogue right now, but there's always 2 or 3 making the rounds, so be sure you've read them. Try to find someone in cosmetics marketing and ask to meet up with them, I'm sure most would be happy to oblige.
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Nyte wrote: Not sure how true this is for university students, but as someone that always has a job, I frequently get spammed by recruiters asking me to join their companies. My guess is that if these students were somehow connected via the random people they add to recruiters, they might get contacted. Again, not sure if this actually works.

What actually might be a lot more useful is to find people (preferably in a role you're interested in) at some of these companies and start a conversation with them rather than just randomly adding them. You'll learn more about the job, and if they like you, might even offer you an internship. I suspect you'll have to go through a whole bunch of people for something like this.
In other words: Networking
chevron wrote: Yep, cosmetics counter at a drug store or department store would be good experience.

Blog about cosmetics, even if you have low readership. Keep it professional. You don't need Jezebel (lol, feminist sites blogging about makeup) to start writing. This is the internet, there are no gatekeepers. Consider Youtube, since every company is looking for fresh faces in new media. Review products, blog about press releases, that kind of thing. Do your reading! Someone else could tell you which marketing books are in vogue right now, but there's always 2 or 3 making the rounds, so be sure you've read them. Try to find someone in cosmetics marketing and ask to meet up with them, I'm sure most would be happy to oblige.
She could try being the next Michelle Phan via youtube
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[OP]
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Jul 1, 2012
15 posts
Orillia
chevron wrote: Yep, cosmetics counter at a drug store or department store would be good experience.

Blog about cosmetics, even if you have low readership. Keep it professional. You don't need Jezebel (lol, feminist sites blogging about makeup) to start writing. This is the internet, there are no gatekeepers. Consider Youtube, since every company is looking for fresh faces in new media. Review products, blog about press releases, that kind of thing. Do your reading! Someone else could tell you which marketing books are in vogue right now, but there's always 2 or 3 making the rounds, so be sure you've read them. Try to find someone in cosmetics marketing and ask to meet up with them, I'm sure most would be happy to oblige.
Ugh. I don't think my last post passed, presumably because I linked a video.

In any case, I love reading product reviews, and many evenings have been spent doing just that. However, coming from a medium-low income family, I just can't afford to be spending extravagant amounts of money on cosmetic products, let alone luxury brands. I sincerely believe that luxury brands should (and are) made for wealthy people to purchase, and not teenagers who may have to blow their whole paycheck for one item. With that said, the top comment for the video I linked was this:

"I understand that you guys say she should donate make-up she doesn't use. However 'who would buy second hand make-up' because really using make-up that someone else has used is very disgusting. Obviously she has an unreasonable amount of make-up and could donate the ones that she may have brought and decided not to use it's not any of our business because we are not her but she is a beauty guru. Who would really watch someone with only 5 pieces of makeup?"

Yes, I am a girl who likes cosmetics, but I'm also a rational person. I recognize that my money could be better spent elsewhere - given my financial situation - and the limited expenses I have may not gain me the readership or even content I hope for in a product review blog. This may change if I get to work in a department store and can experiment with different products on a regular basis without having to purchase them individually.

What does marketing books in vogue mean? I'm assuming you didn't mean Vogue, the magazine?
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Swinky wrote: Ugh. I don't think my last post passed, presumably because I linked a video.

In any case, I love reading product reviews, and many evenings have been spent doing just that. However, coming from a medium-low income family, I just can't afford to be spending extravagant amounts of money on cosmetic products, let alone luxury brands. I sincerely believe that luxury brands should (and are) made for wealthy people to purchase, and not teenagers who may have to blow their whole paycheck for one item. With that said, the top comment for the video I linked was this:

"I understand that you guys say she should donate make-up she doesn't use. However 'who would buy second hand make-up' because really using make-up that someone else has used is very disgusting. Obviously she has an unreasonable amount of make-up and could donate the ones that she may have brought and decided not to use it's not any of our business because we are not her but she is a beauty guru. Who would really watch someone with only 5 pieces of makeup?"

Yes, I am a girl who likes cosmetics, but I'm also a rational person. I recognize that my money could be better spent elsewhere - given my financial situation - and the limited expenses I have may not gain me the readership or even content I hope for in a product review blog. This may change if I get to work in a department store and can experiment with different products on a regular basis without having to purchase them individually.

What does marketing books in vogue mean? I'm assuming you didn't mean Vogue, the magazine?
Honestly, dont worry too much.

You're still young and have 3 years of university ahead of you

I also did misc jobs during my junior years and didnt decide on a field until like 2nd/3rd year.
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I believe Humber College is the only school in Canada that offers a program in Cosmetic Marketing.
It is a Certificate program, offered through Continuing Education (night school/part time).

Although it is too late for this year, but it might be feasible to do the courses during your summer breaks from University...if you can find accommodations close by. Taking the program - even if you only have one course completed - would, in my opinion, help your profile stand out.

Another option is to contact the companies you are interested in and ask about information interviews - not a lot of companies give these, but one might.

A third option is to consider approaching Marketing or Public Relations companies that have a lot of beauty clients - I know (in Canada) Estee Lauder has used OverCat Communications - and seeking internships there.

Good luck.
[OP]
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Jul 1, 2012
15 posts
Orillia
HTTP04 wrote:
She could try being the next Michelle Phan via youtube

I love Michelle Phan, haha. I followed her throughout the years and she is an inspiration. I actually just recently saw a video of her visiting The Bay in Canada as a Lancome representative, and she briefly stated that she has 4 businesses right now, which is incredibly impressive. I'm not talking down on myself in any way, and I certainly don't think I am unattractive, but I just really don't think I have the look to "make it" as a youtube celebrity, nor do I wish to be the face of a product, like she is with Lancome. I'll pass that position up to a professional model or celebrity.

HTTP04, I saw your post about networking (cold emailing/cold calling), and actually bookmarked it. I admire your organization and hope to actively try this when school starts and my university is hosting networking sessions.



I really appreciate all the feedback, everyone, this post has opened me up to a lot of options I hadn't thought of by myself!
HoleyMoley wrote: I believe Humber College is the only school in Canada that offers a program in Cosmetic Marketing.
It is a Certificate program, offered through Continuing Education (night school/part time).

Although it is too late for this year, but it might be feasible to do the courses during your summer breaks from University...if you can find accommodations close by. Taking the program - even if you only have one course completed - would, in my opinion, help your profile stand out.

Another option is to contact the companies you are interested in and ask about information interviews - not a lot of companies give these, but one might.

A third option is to consider approaching Marketing or Public Relations companies that have a lot of beauty clients - I know (in Canada) Estee Lauder has used OverCat Communications - and seeking internships there.

Good luck.

I have to go out soon but just wanted to thank you for those links! I already emailed Humber college for more information (specifically, how will the certificate help me). I will check out the other link when I get back.
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HTTP04 wrote: In other words: Networking
Sure, but there are many ways of doing so.
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Swinky wrote: Ugh. I don't think my last post passed, presumably because I linked a video.

In any case, I love reading product reviews, and many evenings have been spent doing just that. However, coming from a medium-low income family, I just can't afford to be spending extravagant amounts of money on cosmetic products, let alone luxury brands. I sincerely believe that luxury brands should (and are) made for wealthy people to purchase, and not teenagers who may have to blow their whole paycheck for one item. With that said, the top comment for the video I linked was this:

"I understand that you guys say she should donate make-up she doesn't use. However 'who would buy second hand make-up' because really using make-up that someone else has used is very disgusting. Obviously she has an unreasonable amount of make-up and could donate the ones that she may have brought and decided not to use it's not any of our business because we are not her but she is a beauty guru. Who would really watch someone with only 5 pieces of makeup?"

Yes, I am a girl who likes cosmetics, but I'm also a rational person. I recognize that my money could be better spent elsewhere - given my financial situation - and the limited expenses I have may not gain me the readership or even content I hope for in a product review blog. This may change if I get to work in a department store and can experiment with different products on a regular basis without having to purchase them individually.

What does marketing books in vogue mean? I'm assuming you didn't mean Vogue, the magazine?
Then instead of going for the luxury brands, why not try to blog about drug store brands? There are a ton of girls in your position that, despite loving makeup and other beauty products, can't justify spending $30+ on a foundation. If you have the knowledge and experience in budget brands, you could do a beauty on a budget kind of thing where you show girls how to make the most of what they have. Some girls may also just not know what they're looking for and may benefit from tips as to what to look for to buy a few decent pieces instead of a bunch of stuff that doesn't work for them.

Good luck, though. Many people have no idea what they want to do still and are even further into their program than you are. It's nice that you have a goal so you can work towards that. =)
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Nyte wrote: Not sure how true this is for university students, but as someone that always has a job, I frequently get spammed by recruiters asking me to join their companies. My guess is that if these students were somehow connected via the random people they add to recruiters, they might get contacted. Again, not sure if this actually works.

What actually might be a lot more useful is to find people (preferably in a role you're interested in) at some of these companies and start a conversation with them rather than just randomly adding them. You'll learn more about the job, and if they like you, might even offer you an internship. I suspect you'll have to go through a whole bunch of people for something like this.
+1 for informational interview.
I had an informational interview that lead to me getting invited to an industry event and talking with people in industry. While I didn't directly get a job, speaking with people gave me a moment of clarity to look for a backdoor. I'm now a step closer to getting into the industry I want.

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