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Ice built up on AC hoses

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  • Aug 26th, 2021 5:08 pm
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[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
9693 posts
1148 upvotes

Ice built up on AC hoses

This happened first 2 weeks ago. I did the search online and followed the instructions to turn off the AC unit, turn the AC fan on until all ice melted, and made sure the air filter is clean. Also, I opened up all air vents in the house where I originally closed off those in the basement and half on the main floor as I thought that can help forcing the cold air up to the second floor. But I guess that's one of the reasons causing the frozen hoses.

Anyway, it has been running ok until yesterday again. A bit of ice built up again, but definitely not as serious as what happened two weeks, maybe 1/5 of ice. I turned off the AC and ran on fan again. Then, turned on the AC in the afternoon after all ice melted. However, a bit of ice built up again this morning. I wonder this is normal during the extreme heat days this week and the AC unit is running hard all day as I am working from home ? or there is something wrong with my decade old AC unit ?

Thanks for any advice.
14 replies
Deal Addict
Oct 19, 2020
1048 posts
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GTA
Not normal, call for service.
Most likely a refrigeration problem - if it's using the old refrigerant, r-22, likely looking at replacement if it's leaking.
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Deal Expert
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Feb 11, 2007
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GTA
If you have good airflow through your HVAC, then you may be leaking refrigerant.
How old is your AC?

The other option is to inspect your AC a-coil in the furnace, make sure it's clean.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
9693 posts
1148 upvotes
engineered wrote: If you have good airflow through your HVAC, then you may be leaking refrigerant.
How old is your AC?

The other option is to inspect your AC a-coil in the furnace, make sure it's clean.
It is 12 years old.

How to inspect the AC a-coil in the furnace ? Thanks
Deal Addict
Jun 16, 2009
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Woodbridge
Things that a home owner can do is to verify that filter is not clogged and all the intake vents are open / not blocked by furniture.
To check the leaks on line, you will need refrigeration guage and knowledge how to read / translate the readings.
To inspect the A coil , you will need to open your ducts ( which IMO is not a DIY for a regular home owner)
rdx wrote: It is 12 years old.

How to inspect the AC a-coil in the furnace ? Thanks
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[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
9693 posts
1148 upvotes
newlyborn wrote: Things that a home owner can do is to verify that filter is not clogged and all the intake vents are open / not blocked by furniture.
To check the leaks on line, you will need refrigeration guage and knowledge how to read / translate the readings.
To inspect the A coil , you will need to open your ducts ( which IMO is not a DIY for a regular home owner)
Thanks for the information. I just called up my HVAC guy, he said it could be leaking refrigerant that might requires a part replacement. The refrigerant was actually refilled 3 years ago, so I wonder if it is in facts somewhere is leaking. By the way, the AC guy told me that the cost of the refrigerant for my old unit went up like 10 times. So, I wonder if it still makes sense to replace the parts and refill the expensive refrigerant instead of buying a new AC unit with higher efficiency.....
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Nov 9, 2003
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Grimsby
You can easily check for ice build up on the evaporator coil. Turn on the fan and feel for air coming from your floor vents.

Are you turning the AC on during the heat of the day then setting your thermostat too low causing the machine to run continuously for a long period? If so there is a good chance you will ice up, always bring the temps down gradually.

An AC is designed to cycle on and off allowing any ice to dissipate during the off cycle and before the thermostat calls for more cooling. My wife learned this the hard way many years ago and it took nearly 3 days for the ice to melt.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
9693 posts
1148 upvotes
Owbist wrote: You can easily check for ice build up on the evaporator coil. Turn on the fan and feel for air coming from your floor vents.

Are you turning the AC on during the heat of the day then setting your thermostat too low causing the machine to run continuously for a long period? If so there is a good chance you will ice up, always bring the temps down gradually.

An AC is designed to cycle on and off allowing any ice to dissipate during the off cycle and before the thermostat calls for more cooling. My wife learned this the hard way many years ago and it took nearly 3 days for the ice to melt.
We never set the temperature lower than 23 c, and since we are working from home, it is running the whole day with thermostat at 24 c. So, there is no sudden drop of temperature.

Wow, 3 days to melt, your unit must be frozen a lot.... Lot of ice built up on our unit 2 weeks ago, it took several hours to completely melt. The problem is not how long it takes to melt, it is the water that could damage things inside the furnace. I had the c wire adapter installed inside the furnace. I didn't know this flooding could happen, and installed it very close to the bottom of the unit. Thus, the melting water actually damaged the adapter and I had to replace it.
Deal Expert
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Feb 11, 2007
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rdx wrote: Thanks for the information. I just called up my HVAC guy, he said it could be leaking refrigerant that might requires a part replacement. The refrigerant was actually refilled 3 years ago, so I wonder if it is in facts somewhere is leaking. By the way, the AC guy told me that the cost of the refrigerant for my old unit went up like 10 times. So, I wonder if it still makes sense to replace the parts and refill the expensive refrigerant instead of buying a new AC unit with higher efficiency.....
If you had to have it filled, then it 100% has a leak, unless you had the leak fixed and it will keep leaking out.

Get a quote to find and repair the leak, and get a few quotes for a new unit. Doubt it will be more efficient unless you pony up for one with a high SEER rating.
Owbist wrote: You can easily check for ice build up on the evaporator coil. Turn on the fan and feel for air coming from your floor vents.

Are you turning the AC on during the heat of the day then setting your thermostat too low causing the machine to run continuously for a long period? If so there is a good chance you will ice up, always bring the temps down gradually.

An AC is designed to cycle on and off allowing any ice to dissipate during the off cycle and before the thermostat calls for more cooling. My wife learned this the hard way many years ago and it took nearly 3 days for the ice to melt.
A properly sized and functioning AC can run constantly without icing. Mine runs 9am-9pm just fine. It will only ice up if low on refrigerant or if airflow is too low.
I can also bring temps down from 28C to 22C without icing.

It sounds like your AC is oversized for your place, has poor airflow or is low on refrigerant.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
9693 posts
1148 upvotes
engineered wrote: If you had to have it filled, then it 100% has a leak, unless you had the leak fixed and it will keep leaking out.

Get a quote to find and repair the leak, and get a few quotes for a new unit. Doubt it will be more efficient unless you pony up for one with a high SEER rating.
I see. I thought all new units would be more efficient. Anyway, my AC will come and see what needs to be fixed and advise if I should buy a new unit instead.

Buying a new AC unit will be easier $3K. If fixing it costs less $500 and last another 4-5 years, I guess I should go with fixing it, right ? Thanks
Deal Addict
Jun 16, 2009
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Woodbridge
If the leak is at shredder valve then the cost is under 500. If the leak is in A coil ( most probably) or in condensor outside, it should cost you north of $1000.
Fixing a leak in A coil with freon aka R22 is not worth atleast IMO
rdx wrote: I see. I thought all new units would be more efficient. Anyway, my AC will come and see what needs to be fixed and advise if I should buy a new unit instead.

Buying a new AC unit will be easier $3K. If fixing it costs less $500 and last another 4-5 years, I guess I should go with fixing it, right ? Thanks
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Sep 27, 2006
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Not so easy there Ma…
rdx wrote: I see. I thought all new units would be more efficient. Anyway, my AC will come and see what needs to be fixed and advise if I should buy a new unit instead.

Buying a new AC unit will be easier $3K. If fixing it costs less $500 and last another 4-5 years, I guess I should go with fixing it, right ? Thanks
Look on the ID plate on the outdoor unit where the model number etc is. It will indicate if it's r22 or 410a refrigerant. R22 has been banned from import and production in North America. If it's r22 chances are you're looking at a replacement AC system because leak repair is likely not worth fixing.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
9693 posts
1148 upvotes
fergy wrote: Look on the ID plate on the outdoor unit where the model number etc is. It will indicate if it's r22 or 410a refrigerant. R22 has been banned from import and production in North America. If it's r22 chances are you're looking at a replacement AC system because leak repair is likely not worth fixing.
I don't see exactly R22 on the metal plate, but see two "22" on it as shown below. I guess it is R22...

F. ID. 22N
HCFC - 22

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