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Identifying the plant used for hedge

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  • Jul 7th, 2020 7:59 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Sep 30, 2017
111 posts
71 upvotes

Identifying the plant used for hedge

Guys I am looking for help identifying the plant that is is use for this hedging
I have this on both sides of my house but one side is not growing as healthy and tall so wanted to know what type it is and how to care for it
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10 replies
[OP]
Jr. Member
Sep 30, 2017
111 posts
71 upvotes
Thanks .
I am wondering why my one side is tall and healthy while the hedge on the other side is short and has gap’s especially at the bottoms
Sr. Member
Aug 29, 2019
995 posts
453 upvotes
ahaneo wrote: Thanks .
I am wondering why my one side is tall and healthy while the hedge on the other side is short and has gap’s especially at the bottoms
Gaps in hedging often occur when there is poor access to light. This particular side may be more shaded from the sun than the other, for example, your car or even the adjacent hedge might be casting a shadow on that side of the hedge when the sun comes up.

It also occurs if you leave your hedge to get big and wide, the inner branches often stop producing folliage, creating gaps in the inner most part of the plant, which is especially noticable when you trim the hedge back down to a shorter and narrower width. You chop off all the leafy folliage that was covering the voids where the plant stopped producing folliage because of the poor access to light.

My recommendation to avoid this is to maintain a regular trimming schedule, this may mean dilligently pruning the hedge to maintain your preferred size every other year. Don't leave it for 5 years or trim when you feel like it allowing the hedge to get larger than what you want it to be, this will restrict light to the inner folliage and the plant will stop producing folliage there and you will continue to get gaps. Do this type of aggressive pruning in early spring before the plant leafs out.

You should also prune out those dead shoots (like right now) and throw them in the garbage. That could be insect, weather or fungus related that could spread to the rest of the hedge.

If you have access to the soil underneath, rake away any old leaf debris that you can reach, it could harbour fungus. Do this now but try to maintain doing so regularly in the fall and after you prune in the spring to avoid spores wintering on old leaves and getting on the rest of the plant.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Sep 30, 2017
111 posts
71 upvotes
Katedontbreak wrote: Gaps in hedging often occur when there is poor access to light. This particular side may be more shaded from the sun than the other, for example, your car or even the adjacent hedge might be casting a shadow on that side of the hedge when the sun comes up.

It also occurs if you leave your hedge to get big and wide, the inner branches often stop producing folliage, creating gaps in the inner most part of the plant, which is especially noticable when you trim the hedge back down to a shorter and narrower width. You chop off all the leafy folliage that was covering the voids where the plant stopped producing folliage because of the poor access to light.

My recommendation to avoid this is to maintain a regular trimming schedule, this may mean dilligently pruning the hedge to maintain your preferred size every other year. Don't leave it for 5 years or trim when you feel like it allowing the hedge to get larger than what you want it to be, this will restrict light to the inner folliage and the plant will stop producing folliage there and you will continue to get gaps. Do this type of aggressive pruning in early spring before the plant leafs out.

You should also prune out those dead shoots (like right now) and throw them in the garbage. That could be insect, weather or fungus related that could spread to the rest of the hedge.

If you have access to the soil underneath, rake away any old leaf debris that you can reach, it could harbour fungus. Do this now but try to maintain doing so regularly in the fall and after you prune in the spring to avoid spores wintering on old leaves and getting on the rest of the plant.
Thanks for the detailed insight
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 8, 2002
13074 posts
4158 upvotes
GTA
OP, just an fyi for the future. There are tons of free apps that can identify plants for you. I use plantnet.
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Moderator
May 28, 2012
11923 posts
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Saskatoon
Katedontbreak wrote: Pyracantha
I'm not at all familiar with that plant, but it doesn't look like what's in the OP's pic (which has non-glossy leaves).
Sr. Member
Aug 29, 2019
995 posts
453 upvotes
Mars2012 wrote: I'm not at all familiar with that plant, but it doesn't look like what's in the OP's pic (which has non-glossy leaves).
You could ask op to post a better picture but that's not how I identified the plant. Pyracantha has many different cultivars and that particular shape of leaf with the serated edges plus the orange-red berries was what I used to identify it. It's a very common hedging tree.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Sep 30, 2017
111 posts
71 upvotes
I was at a local nursery today and saw the same plants for sale, these are "Spirea Snowmounds" that my previous house owners have planted as a hedge.
Sr. Member
Aug 29, 2019
995 posts
453 upvotes
ahaneo wrote: I was at a local nursery today and saw the same plants for sale, these are "Spirea Snowmounds" that my previous house owners have planted as a hedge.
That's great. Still the exact same care listed above. Keep them trimmed so that the plant does not quit developing inner and lower foliage where the sun will not hit. Spireas are vulnerable to fungus and root rot, so another reason to keep the size in check to allow light to get into the center of the plant.

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