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If I get a job offer will it detail salary, vacation, benefits etc.

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  • Dec 27th, 2019 10:26 am
[OP]
Penalty Box
Jul 21, 2019
346 posts
652 upvotes

If I get a job offer will it detail salary, vacation, benefits etc.

I had an interview today, but they didn't discuss anything about what it pays, vacation, benefits or anything. They asked if I had any questions but I felt out of place to ask. If they offer me the job will they detail all of that and then I decide if I want it or not?
14 replies
Newbie
Jul 29, 2019
47 posts
107 upvotes
Most interviews will not discuss salary, vacation.. most companies will ask your expected salary range.
When you get an offer, they will tell you the salary, vacation days, floater/personal days...
If benefits you mean DB/DC contribution/matching RRSP, it may not be on the offer. Details like this usually is given to you during your orientation.

In my opinion, always ask questions at the end of an interview (not salary related). That will determine if you fit into their culture and will leave a good impression.
Deal Fanatic
May 31, 2006
5768 posts
358 upvotes
Toronto
I always ask questions at the end of the interview because it shows interest and helps you determine whether or not you will be a good fit. They will outline all of the details if they extend an offer to you. At my last interview, they gave me a salary range. They volunteered the information without me asking.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 27, 2009
7181 posts
4365 upvotes
Victoria, BC
Yes, the actual job offer should detail those things (and then you can try to negotiate for what you want).
Deal Fanatic
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Sep 23, 2009
5034 posts
2195 upvotes
If they don't ask the candidate about compensation and benefits, could it be a sign that they are not interested in continuing?
[OP]
Penalty Box
Jul 21, 2019
346 posts
652 upvotes
renoldman wrote: If they don't ask the candidate about compensation and benefits, could it be a sign that they are not interested in continuing?
Well possibly lol, but then they got into specifics about when I could start and they seemed to like me so I don't know. It was only my fourth interview ever, I have only ever had 3 others, and I got all 3 jobs and in each one they told me about all of that.
Deal Fanatic
Sep 23, 2007
5061 posts
1155 upvotes
Brandon26 wrote: I had an interview today, but they didn't discuss anything about what it pays, vacation, benefits or anything. They asked if I had any questions but I felt out of place to ask. If they offer me the job will they detail all of that and then I decide if I want it or not?
What gets put on the job offer depends on company's HR and the manager. Usually they have templates and just change a few things like your name, title and starting salary. There is certainly no absolute legal requirement about the contents of an employment letter. In fact, an employment relationship can be started without any formal documentation, though this will appear unprofessional and typically only happens in very small companies or minimum wage positions. Legally speaking, whatever the company puts on paper that is beyond minimum mandated by law, the company is liable. So from a legal sense, the less a company puts, the better. But to attract the best candidates, most medium to large companies are happy to list certain things.

If it is not a minimum wage job, a company will often define benefits that are beyond the minimum by law. For example, if it doesn't say you have 3 weeks vacation, then you can assume you get the 2 weeks mandated by law. Bonus structure is often not described in detail in the offer letter because these are subject to change. Health insurance details are typically not put on the offer because the service provider may change from year to year. However, the offer should ideally state that you are eligible for bonus plan and/or health benefits after a probation period or so. There is no law that an employer needs to provide health benefits.

If you feel that you are qualified and that raising the question will not jeopardize your chances, then by all means ask. I think when you are inexperienced, better not to ask too much about as to risk sounding needy. I have over 10 years experience now and feel much more comfortable to ask compensation questions directly. Still have recruiters cold calling me or trying to connect with me on LinkedIn.
Deal Addict
Jun 18, 2018
1329 posts
827 upvotes
Toronto
Had a similar situation; went into an interview and no discussion about salary or benefits or anything. Probably has to go through corporate HR, and less about the manager. I am sure if we asked they would answer, but like yourself, I was hesitant to bring it up and thought it was best to wait for the offer and go from there.
Sr. Member
Apr 18, 2017
675 posts
545 upvotes
Interviews never talk about salary. Interviews are about the job itself and whether you would be a good fit. Salary benefits are the discussion you’d have with HR after. Usually HR asks you about your salary expectations in the initial phone interview.
Deal Addict
Oct 6, 2015
2463 posts
1367 upvotes
Usually they will just incorporate the employee manual "subject to change", or Collective Agreement (if applicable) by reference in employment contracts with larger businesses. The last thing that most businesses want is to have a bunch of different non-executive-level employees on variations of contracts. Any deviation from the template requires some pretty high level approval.

As implied by others, its really an employer's market with the very high unemployment that's out there right now, so don't assume that an employer will "go the extra mile" on something that's important to you unless its in writing. And even then, employers have been known to renege on that. "Custom" clauses in employment contracts are often ignored by incoming managers.
Deal Fanatic
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Nov 6, 2010
9165 posts
1295 upvotes
Montreal, QC
Usually if they talk about it it's at the later stage interviews but even then typically it'll only be talked about if you bring it up, but definitely your offer letter will include all forms of compensation including vacation days and benefits.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Apr 8, 2006
2207 posts
860 upvotes
Usually 99% of the time they will ask because if you expect something beyond what they can offer then you both wasted your time.
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Deal Addict
Oct 29, 2010
4317 posts
667 upvotes
So you went to an interview without any clue about what the job pays?
What if they ask you when can you start and then you give notice to your current job only to find job the pay is way less than what you currently have?

The way I see it, it’s a waste of time for everyone to go for an interview when your range doesn’t match their range.
Many times I see that I have in mind around 100k and they have in mind around 70k. No reason for either me or them to spend more than the initial 5 minute conversation.
Deal Fanatic
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May 11, 2009
5579 posts
2161 upvotes
Debtario
flafson wrote: So you went to an interview without any clue about what the job pays?
What if they ask you when can you start and then you give notice to your current job only to find job the pay is way less than what you currently have?

The way I see it, it’s a waste of time for everyone to go for an interview when your range doesn’t match their range.
Many times I see that I have in mind around 100k and they have in mind around 70k. No reason for either me or them to spend more than the initial 5 minute conversation.
Agreed. I can't stand the whole poker-style game of concealing salaries, not only companies during hiring but employees keeping their salaries private. It all works in the employer's favour, and people are allowing themselves to be exploited.
"I possess a device, in my pocket, capable of accessing the entirety of information known to man. I use it to look at pictures of cats and get in arguments with strangers"
Deal Addict
Aug 16, 2008
1044 posts
394 upvotes
Markham
Sites like Glassdoor and indeed should provide a rough estimate on compensation. If the company is too small/new to not even have a footprint on those sites, chances are the comp will be less than the industry average for that role.

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