Food & Drink

Induction vs conventional cooktop

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  • Dec 10th, 2020 4:16 pm
Sr. Member
Oct 17, 2002
977 posts
177 upvotes
Oakville
Gr8irlbot wrote: The breaker should be the same value or higher rated than the maximum for the model of stove you are buying. Look for models at or below 40A if you can't retrofit to 50A with the proper wiring.
I get that... if you read the specs and manual of the induction ranges (30" - GE Profile, Cafe, Kitchenaid, etc...), they all state 40amp min. But reading online, there are a lot people recommending 50amps - especially when you read how much wattage the burners use (ie., if you use 2 or 3 at the same time - you're pushing it).

Just wondering for those with induction ranges, if you're using them on a 40amp circuit? And if so, any issues?
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May 30, 2010
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KennyX wrote: I get that... if you read the specs and manual of the induction ranges (30" - GE Profile, Cafe, Kitchenaid, etc...), they all state 40amp min. But reading online, there are a lot people recommending 50amps - especially when you read how much wattage the burners use (ie., if you use 2 or 3 at the same time - you're pushing it).

Just wondering for those with induction ranges, if you're using them on a 40amp circuit? And if so, any issues?
If the manufacturer says, 40A minimum, then 40A will operate the whole unit, within the duty cycle it's designed for. Unless they specifically say that you can't use all burners at maximum at the same time, then you should be good to go.

Off course, everyone on the internet has their own opinion on this, including yours truly. Mine just comes from a background in electronics engineering, but hey, I am still just someone on the internet. LOL.

However, specs and ratings are stated by the manufacturers as FACTS. They sure as heck won't put themselves at risk of a hit on their reputation by quoting a rating that trips circuits in normal use. And, even put themselves at risk of liabilities by quoting a rating that would overload the circuit, increasing the chances for fires and such.

Would a 50A circuit work for a 40A range? Yes. Is it needed, if you already have a 40A circuit? NO, as those circuit are dedicated to the range, with nothing else to increase the draw on them. YMMV, if someone has not followed code on this.
Sr. Member
May 21, 2015
910 posts
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Sarnia, ON
My GE Profile is on a 40 amp circuit and we've had no problems whatsoever in two years. The oven can be on cooking a roast, and all the burners work fine.. Remember that the the oven isn't heating continually, it cycles, and that it is unlikely that most people are ever going to have 3 or more burners on high.
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Apr 24, 2017
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I’ve had an induction stove for 7 years. Switched from gas when we redid our kitchen. My wife loved the induction idea but I loved the gas stove. Would never go back now. Instant temperature adjustments, fast heat and the safety aspect are great. We were surprised at the time we bought how many of our pots and pans worked. Now they’re labelled. Back then not so much so we used to shop with a magnet. Go induction. You’ll love it.
Sr. Member
Oct 17, 2002
977 posts
177 upvotes
Oakville
Thanks... just wanted to see if there were issues with using the 'minimum' requirements.

I was worried because when you add up the total wattage of the oven and the burners (on full power), there's no way a 40amp circuit would handle it. But seems like real life scenarios prevail, and it'll work out fine.
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Jul 13, 2010
1935 posts
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Ottawa
Depends on the type of stainless steel. The chromium vs nickel ratio content. Nickel makes it non-magnetic . The best food service stainless steel has a grade of 18/8 or 18/10, which indicates the ideal chromium to nickel ratio for superior corrosion resistance.

https://www.rebeccawood.com/health/cook ... -cookware/

Which Stainless Steel Cookware Series Is Best for Me?
300 Series
Look on the bottom of a stainless steel pot and you’ll see a grade stamped on it; this grade indicates its durability and resistance to rust and corrosion. Quality pots and pans are in the 300 series and designated as either 304 or 316. The 304 pot is stamped with either 18/8 or 18/10 which indicates how much chromium and nickel the alloy contains. Eighteen, the first number of the sequence, indicates the percentage of chromium; the second number indicates the nickel. Most stainless cookware is an 18/10 grade (18 percent chromium/10 percent nickel).

The material difference between a 304 and 316 pot is negligible. However, the less common 316 grade contains a small percentage of molybdenum ( Mo) and/or titanium (Ti). This makes it more pricy and more corrosion resistant. The 316 grade, also known as marine stainless steel, better resists erosion by salt water. Surgical steel is yet another term for this high-end grade as it is used in biomedical implants. Indeed, if a metal pin is holding a fractured bone together, you’d obviously opt for a corrosion-free pin.

400 Series
Stainless steel from the 400 series is more corrosive than that from the 300 series and therefore will rust with age. It is primarily used in mixing bowls, kitchen utensils and inexpensive stockpots. For a more long-lived pot, opt for one from the 300 series.

The 400 series includes the so-called nickel-free stainless steel cookware, 18/0, which still contains a negligible amount of nickel (0.75%); and therefore people with rare nickel sensitivities are cautioned against using all stainless steel cookware including that from the 400 series. As nickel is not magnetic, you can tell if the pot’s interior or exterior contains nickel by placing a magnet against it. Any nickel-free portion of the pot will hold a magnet. (To be compatible with induction stovetops, the bottom of a stainless pot must be nickel-free.)
thriftshopper wrote: My surprise is when I find S/S pots/pans that are partial to magnets. Most that I've come across are not magnet attracting.
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Jul 7, 2017
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Found a 10" Zwilling-labelled China-made J.A. Henckels S/S 3-ply 18/10 sauté pan at the local Salvation Army thrift shop yesterday. There's a small ding on the cooking surface otherwise fine (besides lots of burnt-on). Had to hunt around the shop for a magnet to test it and the (film fridge) magnet did cling to it. All set up to use on an induction cooktop when I get around to it (best deal, either $2,500 w. 10-yr warranty on a 2-burner or $2,250 with 5 yr warranty) as t is the only non-cast iron fry/sauté pan that I have.

$5.99 + GST. Beats price of the current equivalent ($89.99 on sale, $150 regular).
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Sep 21, 2010
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Montréal
In one of my old homes I replaced a gas stovetop w induction, which was much better imo. I really don't like gas for potentially unsafe reasons but also it's a mess to keep clean...I personally don't get the fuss but everyone's different.

So many advantages for induction as you already know by now: super-fast boil, safe cool-touch surfaces, auto-shutoff, easy to clean, etc. It's esp a no-brainer vs reg electric. The only real consideration is $ factor since will cost more and may or may not need to replace your cookware.
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[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 4, 2020
808 posts
753 upvotes
Clarington, ON
Further thanks. Apparenly my mind has been made up. Verified our current cookware does have an induction ready symbol.

This purchase intends to line up with tax return time
Member
Feb 27, 2007
429 posts
179 upvotes
Montreal
profile wrote: Bought the induction counter top model at Costco for ~$55.00 and will be taking it back.

Discovered a magnet will not stick to all stainless steel pans. I was quite surprised.
And a pot that is larger than the outline of the ring will not function/heat. Pot must be small enough to fit within the round circle outline boundary.

Loved the speed of water boiling, almost instantaneous. Will consider induction when replacing full stove.
I assume u bought the Costco's slim version of Salton portable induction cooktop. If u have not returned the cooktop:
- what is the width of the the "outline of the ring"/outside round circle, and
- could the cooktop maintain a slow simmer?
Thanks in advance!
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Jul 29, 2013
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MontrealPost wrote: I assume u bought the Costco's slim version of Salton portable induction cooktop. If u have not returned the cooktop:
- what is the width of the the "outline of the ring"/outside round circle, and
- could the cooktop maintain a slow simmer?
Thanks in advance!
Sorry, MontrealPost, I returned it.
Member
Feb 27, 2007
429 posts
179 upvotes
Montreal
profile wrote: Sorry, MontrealPost, I returned it.
All good!
I appreciate your sharing info on "Pot must be small enough to fit within the round circle outline boundary" on the Costco's slim Salton portable. I plan to buy one next summer, looking at the Ikea Tillreda 1800w. Heard that Tillreda cannot maintain slow simmer, something about ~"cycles" WHEN AT LOW VOLTAGE, i.e. cooktop works for ~1/4 of the time then stop, restart automatically after a while. I continue my research . . . .

Happy holidays and stay safe!
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May 30, 2010
1641 posts
1051 upvotes
MontrealPost wrote: All good!
I appreciate your sharing info on "Pot must be small enough to fit within the round circle outline boundary" on the Costco's slim Salton portable. I plan to buy one next summer, looking at the Ikea Tillreda 1800w. Heard that Tillreda cannot maintain slow simmer, something about ~"cycles" WHEN AT LOW VOLTAGE, i.e. cooktop works for ~1/4 of the time then stop, restart automatically after a while. I continue my research . . . .

Happy holidays and stay safe!
This is an issue with a lot of the electric coils (exposed or glass encased) as well. They regulate duty cycle, rather than current output. That's a problem for induction as the heating occurs as induction current flows through the cooking vessel, instead of heating up an element that has heat retention of it's own. One way to get around this is to use really heavy stainless steel / carbon steel, with an additional bottom layer, or cast iron pots. The other way, is to put a cast iron crepe pan on the induction plate, heat it up at max and then put your pot on top of the pan, and adjust to maintain a simmer. It's a waste of power, but it works and it also works around the pot too big issue as well.
Member
Feb 27, 2007
429 posts
179 upvotes
Montreal
This thread is "Induction vs conventional cooktop". The full sized Induction cooktops generally don't have problems in cycling and simmers like the portable ones that we discuss. I started a new thread and hope we can continue discussion on PORTABLES at portable-induction-hotplate-single-burner-2428238/

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