Computers & Electronics

Internet 150 and 2.4 GHz and 5GHz WiFi

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 17th, 2018 4:04 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Oct 29, 2017
115 posts
14 upvotes

Internet 150 and 2.4 GHz and 5GHz WiFi

I've got Internet 150 at home which gives me a download speed of 150Mbps and I have a dual band router that supports 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequencies.

When I connect to my 2.4 GHz band, I'm lucky if I reach a max download speed of 80 Mbps, but according to the net, "2.4 GHz Wi-Fi will support up to 450 Mbps or 600 Mbps"

Would anyone know why, when I have just a single wireless device connected to the 2.4 GHz band, I can't get speeds faster than 80 Mbps. I've rebooted the router and laptop, but no change.

Thank you
27 replies
Deal Addict
Jul 21, 2005
1533 posts
626 upvotes
Interference. The maximum speeds stated are in ideal conditions. In addition, 2.4 Ghz band has been used for Wifi for a long time, if you have an oldschool router running Wireless B for example, it's theoretical maximum is 11mbps...and it's still on 2.4Ghz, so technology matters too. Most implementations nowadays are backwards compatible, look for settings on the router to reduce backwards compatibility, which increases your throughput.

Here is an outdated picture, but you get the idea

Image
Member
Feb 15, 2006
249 posts
Toronto, ON
What type of wireless device are you connecting/testing the speed on? This plays a factor too. I am assuming you’re on Rogers internet plan?
Deal Addict
Jan 13, 2014
1754 posts
906 upvotes
Calgary
Several reasons:

- 450/600Mbps requires using 40MHz channel width instead of the default 20MHz. If there are multiple Wi-Fi networks around (very common on 2.4GHz), you'll be stuck with 20MHz which halves the bandwidth (forget that 600MBps number since very few devices outside of the router manufacturer support it).

- Those numbers also require up to 3 spatial streams (essentially, "lanes" of traffic). Your laptop may only support 1 spatial stream, so cut that number again by half to a third.

- Overhead. You'll virtually never get the advertised maximum Wi-Fi speed.... even under ideal conditions (which no home WiFi network falls under).

Bottom line, you're pretty much maxing out what your device can do on the 2.4GHz band. You could find a better Wi-Fi card that supports multiple spatial streams, but in all fairness you're better off trying to to get something that will utilize the 5GHz band.
Deal Addict
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Nov 12, 2011
4071 posts
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Niagara-on-the-Lake
What speed do you get on the 5GHz band?

Also, have you tried hard wiring the device to the router and testing the connection that way?
[OP]
Jr. Member
Oct 29, 2017
115 posts
14 upvotes
eblend wrote: Interference. The maximum speeds stated are in ideal conditions. In addition, 2.4 Ghz band has been used for Wifi for a long time, if you have an oldschool router running Wireless B for example, it's theoretical maximum is 11mbps...and it's still on 2.4Ghz, so technology matters too. Most implementations nowadays are backwards compatible, look for settings on the router to reduce backwards compatibility, which increases your throughput.

Here is an outdated picture, but you get the idea

Image
Would interference account for speeds to be cut by half? The laptop is quite new and has an 802.11ac wireless card which according to the chart you included has a theoretical speed of 500 Mbps.

To summarise:

Wireless card - theoretical speed 500 Mbps
ISP Internet package - theoretical max speed - 150 Mbps

Real world speed test using ISP speed test page - 80 Mbps when no other devices are on the network. That would be all interference on the 2.4 GHz network?
[OP]
Jr. Member
Oct 29, 2017
115 posts
14 upvotes
Nicholas wrote: What type of wireless device are you connecting/testing the speed on? This plays a factor too. I am assuming you’re on Rogers internet plan?
It's the Shaw 150 plan and I have a single laptop that has wireless 802.11ac card.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Oct 29, 2017
115 posts
14 upvotes
Typhoonz wrote: What speed do you get on the 5GHz band?

Also, have you tried hard wiring the device to the router and testing the connection that way?
The speeds are normal on 5GHz, about 150MHz, I'm just not understanding how interference can impact my speeds so much on the 2.4GHz network, even when I'm only 2-feet away from the router and modem.
Deal Addict
Feb 16, 2012
1929 posts
691 upvotes
Toronto
Wireless ac only functions on 5GHz... If you are connecting via 2.4GHz you are not using 802.11ac..

802.11n works on both 2.4Ghz and/or 5Ghz and the theoretical speeds on 5Ghz vs 2.4Ghz aren't that different for 802.11n.

802.11b and 802.11g work on 2.4Ghz only.

I personally run 2.4Ghz 802.11n only and 5Ghz 802.11ac only. I don't have any older b or g wireless devices anymore so it works for me.

Interesting video:
Last edited by geogolem on Aug 12th, 2018 5:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: autocorrect error
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 24, 2003
15895 posts
2584 upvotes
Toronto
Just tested my Rogers speed using the Coda 4582 modem/router and my speeds are similar on 2.4. Switching to 5 Ghz makes a huge difference.
Images
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Deal Addict
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Nov 12, 2011
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Niagara-on-the-Lake
audit13 wrote: Just tested my Rogers speed using the Coda 4582 modem/router and my speeds are similar on 2.4. Switching to 5 Ghz makes a huge difference.
I'm getting the same speeds in my 150Mbps Rogers plan running a speed test using 2.4GHz on my phone.
Deal Addict
Jan 13, 2014
1754 posts
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Calgary
timc00k wrote: Wireless card - theoretical speed 500 Mbps
ISP Internet package - theoretical max speed - 150 Mbps
That theoretical speed for your WiFi card is for one that supports 3 spatial streams (3x3). Very few cards support that.

As for interference, even if the laptop is placed right next to your router, there's still background noise / interference present. Heck, your laptop alone is probably generating a fair amount of said interference!
Deal Addict
Jul 3, 2017
3860 posts
2774 upvotes
Devbux has it right. It's very unlikely that your laptop supports 3 spatial streams for 2.4 GHz, and if you live anywhere in a city, it's virtually impossible to hog a 40 MHz wide channel all to yourself without excessive mutual interference between you and your neighbours. It's like saying that in theory your car can hit 200 km/hr top speed, so why is it taking you an hour to get to work downtown?
Deal Addict
Jul 21, 2005
1533 posts
626 upvotes
timc00k wrote: Would interference account for speeds to be cut by half? The laptop is quite new and has an 802.11ac wireless card which according to the chart you included has a theoretical speed of 500 Mbps.

To summarise:

Wireless card - theoretical speed 500 Mbps
ISP Internet package - theoretical max speed - 150 Mbps

Real world speed test using ISP speed test page - 80 Mbps when no other devices are on the network. That would be all interference on the 2.4 GHz network?
a
You never mentioned which router you are using. It doesn't matter if your laptop has an AC card, unless your router supports AC, you are not using AC. You really should be using something on the 5Ghz band nowadays
Deal Addict
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Nov 12, 2011
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Niagara-on-the-Lake
eblend wrote: a
You never mentioned which router you are using. It doesn't matter if your laptop has an AC card, unless your router supports AC, you are not using AC. You really should be using something on the 5Ghz band nowadays
I have a question for you. I'm using an Asus RT-N66U and when I'm on my 5Ghz frequency I'm getting only around 80Mbps download (only thing connected to the router) on a 150Mbps Rogers Ignite plan. Any ideas why it's so low? I get the same speeds on my 2.4Ghz network too.

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