Cell Phones

Isn't rapid charging bad for batteries??

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Isn't rapid charging bad for batteries??

My knowledge of batteries and electronics suggests the rapid charging features all the new phones are coming with are destroying the batter, the battery that you can't even change any more!
The longer you charge the battery, the longer it will work. Once you use faster charging, the number of total charges drops drastically. If a typical 2500mah battery lasts about a year - year and a half before it starts to deteriorate, a battery that is often being rapidly charged should show signs as fast as 6-8 months and by 2-year mark it should be near worthless. It's all good for phones which have an option to change the battery,but most new phones, including Galaxy S6 don't even have that! So you spend $1000 for a phone and it will go dead within 2 years.
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Buy a phone where you can replace the battery yourself, then don't worry about it, replace the batter for $30 yourself then

Ive had my phone for almost two years, and charge it whatever way when I charge, sometimes slow, sometimes fast, somestimes it drains dead, sometimes its plugged in over night

Don't notice anything different about my battery
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dazz wrote: My knowledge of batteries and electronics suggests the rapid charging features all the new phones are coming with are destroying the batter, the battery that you can't even change any more!
I would imagine the people making the phone/battery would say otherwise, they know what they're doing, you don't.
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shabby wrote: I would imagine the people making the phone/battery would say otherwise, they know what they're doing, you don't.
lol. There are only a few types of batteries and they all have pros and cons. There's no new technology in batteries.
Just because something is being offered, doesn't mean it's well thought out!
Certainly, if YOU don't know anything, it doesn't mean others don't know either so answer for yourself.
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Well enlighten us with your knowledge of battery chemistry and why its superior to that of a samsung/lg/motorola engineer.
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shabby wrote: Well enlighten us with your knowledge of battery chemistry and why its superior to that of a samsung/lg/motorola engineer.
I will. First, provide data where those engineers or companies claim their batteries will last you 2-3 years without any deterioration.
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Good or bad I don't keep them long enough to find out. :)
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dazz wrote: I will. First, provide data where those engineers or companies claim their batteries will last you 2-3 years without any deterioration.
The major vendors state their batteries are good for 400 to 500 full cycles before deterioration begins. If you charge 50 to 60 percent every night, the battery should work to around 80% capacity (or more) after 2 years. Seems to be what I've found with iPhone batteries.
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dazz wrote: I will. First, provide data where those engineers or companies claim their batteries will last you 2-3 years without any deterioration.
I don't see that any of them have, but they never did that with slow charging batteries either.

That aside, my understanding of most of these new "quick charging" technologies is that they are, indeed, working on technologies that will charge faster, but still maintain battery lifetime. That's why they don't charge to 100% at the quick rate, there's always some curve involved. You don't think they've done the *teensiest* bit of research into this? If all of these new fast charging phones start needing battery replacements a year from now, you don't think that'll be a huge PR disaster? I guarantee you that there's more going on here than you think.

Also, you said "There's no new technology in batteries."? Really? They are *constantly* working on new battery tech to make batteries smaller and longer lasting.
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wearysky wrote: I don't see that any of them have, but they never did that with slow charging batteries either.

That aside, my understanding of most of these new "quick charging" technologies is that they are, indeed, working on technologies that will charge faster, but still maintain battery lifetime. That's why they don't charge to 100% at the quick rate, there's always some curve involved. You don't think they've done the *teensiest* bit of research into this? If all of these new fast charging phones start needing battery replacements a year from now, you don't think that'll be a huge PR disaster? I guarantee you that there's more going on here than you think.

Also, you said "There's no new technology in batteries."? Really? They are *constantly* working on new battery tech to make batteries smaller and longer lasting.

Constantly working on battery technology, doesn't mean much. Of course they do,but there's nothing new out there. Battery size and weight shrinks maybe every 5-10 years(half the weight and size), depending on the type of batteries.
You guys are too funny to think companies would do 2-3 year tests to find out how long things will last. If they cared about longevity of their products, they wouldn't release phones that bend in your pockets or crack when fallen from 2'.
Again there's currently no new technology in regards to the batteries, the circuit on your phone controls the V and Amps and that's pretty much it.

Again, charging fast does slowly destroy your battery as it introduces more heat. Anyone claiming that their 2-3 years old phone has the same juice as it was when you bought the phone is full of BS. That's impossible and there are no battery out there that after 500 plus charge cycles will work the same as new. That's just impossible.

It is typical to have a drop of 10%-20% per year(365 charge cycles). Those who charge their phone a few times per day will be on the higher end. Those who use fast charging often can see as much as 30% decline after 1 year.
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I usually use a 10 Watt (OEM) charger for my iPhone, instead of the usual 5 Watt one. Seems fine.

Given my iPhone is 2.5 years old, I'd say that 10-20% loss per year estimate is off, at least for iPhones. I have not lost 25-50% of my battery life. No doubt I have lost some though. I charge my phone every day, and often several times a day. Also, at home I often leave my phone plugged in for many hours longer than necessary. It should be noted though that Apple seems to have better battery charging management in their software than some other companies for their mobile products.

Maybe a better range would be 5-20% per year, depending upon usage and model. If you told me my 2.5 year old iPhone has lost say 7.5% per year, that might be more believable than 10-20% per year, as 7.5% per year translates to a little under 20% total.
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EugW wrote: I usually use a 10 Watt (OEM) charger for my iPhone, instead of the usual 5 Watt one. Seems fine.

Given my iPhone is 2.5 years old, I'd say that 10-20% loss per year estimate is off, at least for iPhones. I have not lost 25-50% of my battery life. No doubt I have lost some though. I charge my phone every day, and often several times a day. Also, at home I often leave my phone plugged in for many hours longer than necessary. It should be noted though that Apple seems to have better battery charging management in their software than some other companies for their mobile products.

Maybe a better range would be 5-20% per year, depending upon usage and model. If you told me my 2.5 year old iPhone has lost say 7.5% per year, that might be more believable than 10-20% per year, as 7.5% per year translates to a little under 20% total.
How do you know you haven't lost 20-30%? You charge your phone sever times a day - that's insane! Even with gaming and lots of talking my S3 was good for 8 hours for months. Or without gaming it lasted me for almost 2 days! Slowly those numbers dropped until I realized it can't do what it used to.
The drop is gradual so you just didn't notice it.
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dazz wrote: How do you know you haven't lost 20-30%? You charge your phone sever times a day - that's insane! Even with gaming and lots of talking my S3 was good for 8 hours for months. Or without gaming it lasted me for almost 2 days! Slowly those numbers dropped until I realized it can't do what it used to.
The drop is gradual so you just didn't notice it.
I charge it whenever I have a charger handy even if I have 80% left, which is why several times a day. However if I do not do that and just use it as a regular phone and texting device, it will still last days.

IPhones don't exactly have large batteries either.

So, yeah, maybe it's lost 1/5th of its battery life, but definitely not 1/3rd.
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EugW wrote: I usually use a 10 Watt (OEM) charger for my iPhone, instead of the usual 5 Watt one. Seems fine.
Your old iPhone can only draw around 1A of current (~5W), so it doesn't really matter if you use a 10W or 5W charger - they'll both charge your phone at about the same rate.
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ChinpokoMon wrote: Your old iPhone can only draw around 1A of current (~5W), so it doesn't really matter if you use a 10W or 5W charger - they'll both charge your phone at about the same rate.
You are correct sir. I just measured it with my Kill-A-Watt. It charges at 5 Watts with both chargers. This is when the phone is over 85%, but I suspect it will not be much be different if the phone only has say 10% charge.
Wayner02 wrote: Good article on how to manage lithium ion batteries.

http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/arti ... _batteries

Apparently it's better to charge the battery more often before it runs low
Heh, there we go. ;)

FWIW, my 6 year old MacBook Pro is still on its first battery. Yeah, it's lost a lot of its battery life, but otherwise it still functions well. This is in stark contrast to my old iBook. That thing would go through batteries like mad. The batteries would become horrible only after a few years.

I suspect the battery protection mechanisms in the batteries, laptops, and/or OS had gotten a lot better since between 2001 and 2009.
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dazz wrote: How do you know you haven't lost 20-30%? You charge your phone sever times a day - that's insane! Even with gaming and lots of talking my S3 was good for 8 hours for months. Or without gaming it lasted me for almost 2 days! Slowly those numbers dropped until I realized it can't do what it used to.
The drop is gradual so you just didn't notice it.
EugW wrote: I charge it whenever I have a charger handy even if I have 80% left, which is why several times a day. However if I do not do that and just use it as a regular phone and texting device, it will still last days.

IPhones don't exactly have large batteries either.

So, yeah, maybe it's lost 1/5th of its battery life, but definitely not 1/3rd.
I downloaded an OS X application called coconutBattery and checked out the stats for our iPhone 5 and iPhone 5s, and both have lost way less than 20%.

iPhone 5 (Manufactured 2012-11-19 - Age 2 yrs 6 mos) - 90% of original battery capacity
iPhone 5s (Manufactured 2013-09-30 - Age 1 yr 8 mos) - 89% of original battery capacity

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