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Job Offer: But moving out of Edmonton to Vancouver

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  • Aug 22nd, 2021 10:31 am
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Dec 27, 2009
7751 posts
5239 upvotes
Victoria, BC
GTA12345 wrote: I certainly hear many good things about Victoria. Ontarians always make the comment of retiring there.

But I know so little abut it. Looking now, I saw it's only 118 km from VAN according to Google but over 3 hrs I assume due to the ferry. So I guess a day trip to Vancouver is tight on time. Is it a nice ferry with food? Would make that trip much more palatable.

Gov town, I assume that's part of what drives the incomes in Victoria. Ad retiree money perhaps?

Learning more about BC this week than I'd have thought.
A day trip to Vancouver is very doable, but I don't bother lol. The only time I'm ever there is if I'm on the way to getting somewhere else (driving through, or landing in the airport) - or possibly a concert (but that has been years). The ferry is about 1 hour, 35 minutes. Yes, the ferries are nice. The ferry ride is very beautiful too. First ferry leaves at 7AM, and they run hourly in the summer months, every 2 hours at less busy times of the year. I would far rather spend my day exploring the Island if I'm in the mood to get out of town. So much beauty here.
Jr. Member
Apr 10, 2009
151 posts
93 upvotes
Vancouver Island
GTA12345 wrote: I certainly hear many good things about Victoria. Ontarians always make the comment of retiring there.

But I know so little abut it. Looking now, I saw it's only 118 km from VAN according to Google but over 3 hrs I assume due to the ferry. So I guess a day trip to Vancouver is tight on time. Is it a nice ferry with food? Would make that trip much more palatable.

Gov town, I assume that's part of what drives the incomes in Victoria. Ad retiree money perhaps?

Learning more about BC this week than I'd have thought.
BC Ferries that run between Sidney and the mainland are huge ferries with food.

https://www.bcferries.com/on-the-ferry/eat-shop-relax

A day trip to Vancouver is easily doable if you catch an early ferry and late coming home (always make reservations)
Banned
Aug 10, 2021
29 posts
24 upvotes
GTA12345 wrote: Wait, exactly how cheap are these houses? Or what incredibly generous chain store is paying the type of coin that buys 3000sq ft?

At risk of being rude, your personal preference for Edm could (understandably) be placing a higher value on affordability than the avg household would. Not that the avg household can just waltz into Van and be on easy streets, but everyone won't have the same relative weighting of affordability that you do. It may be true that if your income drastically increased, you'd still choose Edm. But surely you can see how other higher income HH might be swayed to Van...
Sure, if you want to spend $1.5 million for a 1200 sq. ft. bungalow and you're rich, don't mind constant rain and cloud, very little culture, high taxes and gas prices, a dead downtown after 8PM, then by all means, move to Vancouver. 99% of folks would never do that though.
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Jun 18, 2020
2836 posts
3390 upvotes
tommy1311 wrote: Sure, if you want to spend $1.5 million for a 1200 sq. ft. bungalow and you're rich, don't mind constant rain and cloud, very little culture, high taxes and gas prices, a dead downtown after 8PM, then by all means, move to Vancouver. 99% of folks would never do that though.
99%.

Was gonna guess 98.7% but fool I am.
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Jun 4, 2007
389 posts
259 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
I’ve always been of the belief that your biggest obstacle in this country is mortgage/rent. If you can get rid of that, then your life significantly improves financially. Especially if you’re an average middle class Joe like myself.

The Prairies offers you that opportunity because the majority of Canadians and newcomers to Canada do NOT want to live here. The statistics tell you that, the population of the Prairies compared to GTA and Vancouver tell you that.

Now everyone will get rid of mortgage eventually, that’s what the Authorization period is for. However, in the Prairies, you can do it a lot quicker and while you’re still relatively young.

And so at the end of the day, it’s all about how much any of that really matters to you and how much you want access that $2,000-$4,000 which would normally go towards your mortgage every month.

Some people don’t care about any of that. They prefer to live in warmer climates, densely populated areas, surrounded by family and friends. That is why when OP of this thread said “I don’t care about owning property and I wanna get away from winters” I knew right then and there that he/she had already made up their mind. Because paying off your house while you’re young and having access to the $2,000-$4,000 is just about all that the Prairies has going for it and to me; having access to that money in my early 40s is a lot more important than living back home in the Greater Toronto Area.

Unless something drastic happens I don’t see myself ever returning back home to the GTA. I’ve mentioned this in other threads I think but for me, life in the Prairies is what I pictured it to be like. I have a career, I started a family, we travel and money is not an issue. We own two paid off vehicles as well as a house which will also be paid off in the next couple of years. To some people, none of that matters but for me, that’s what I pictured my life to be like growing up in the GTA.
Deal Addict
May 22, 2019
1388 posts
1677 upvotes
definitely worth it!

Edmonton is a city without multiculturalism while Vancouver can ensure people from different part of the world to enjoy the same right, same happiness.

To me, multiculturalism worth about 200K a year.

For housing, you should think in this way. If you buy a house in Vancouver now for 1.3 million, it will appreciate to 4 million in 10 years. But if you buy a house in Edmonton now, it probably going to worth the same price after 10 years. Living in Vancouver is the best way to catch the rising economy of China, Vietnam and India.

If you miss Edmonton, you can move back to there after your retire. With the money you gain from salary hike, house price hike, you can live like a king in Edmonton after you retire.
glenn9090 wrote: Hello Rfders

I got selected for a position at Vancouver. Almost double the pay. Is it worth considering to move to Vancouver from Edmonton keeping in mind the high cost of living at Vancouver?. Wondering what would be the pros and cons to move to a bigger city. Need your input before accepting the offer.

I am stressed out right now to take the right decision.


ps: Family with 3 kids :)
World cup is coming
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Jul 29, 2002
1958 posts
83 upvotes
glenn9090 wrote: 1. My aim to move to a place where there is less of snow and weather wise good. I dont like the YEG winters tho
2. I am planning to rent rather than buy.
3. Kids are aged between 5 and 8
4. Yes kids in school.. i dont think they made friends but not sure...
5. yes, my extended family is located at Edmonton


A reason to think more of relocating is because of wife and kids. I am okay about relocation for a better pay, but repacking things and moving to a new place is quite hectic. I moved locally within the city that was troublesome. and Just was thinking how hectic it would be if i move out of province considering the cost of moving furniture and looking for a good house.

Currently i rent a townhouse and I heard that I have to move to a basement or a condo to keep the rent same at YVR.
What's your career prospect, both within the company or your industry, in Vancouver? Personally, that's the biggest factor when I decided to move to a high COL area. Initially money (~1.5 year) was tight but after a few promotions then it's much more flexible (YMMV, of course). Downsizing was actually not a huge problem for us since we now have the flexibility to go out year round.

On 4, this is also probably your last opportunity to move. As they get older, you will have a harder time moving.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Mar 12, 2013
622 posts
304 upvotes
YEG
Thank you everyone for their valuable input on this. At this stage, I am negotiating with HR for the package. The package that was offered was much less than what was discussed during the interview. If HR agrees for it, then i will eventually move else will have to think once again. In my initial post i said that the salary was double and now they offed me 50% raise.

Cant predict the career prospects. No big promotions at least for 5 years. I am stuck with this for next 5 years. The manager told that as you go up on this position, there are less opportunities as eventually I will get a chance if someone retires or someone quit the job.

on point # 4, I think i will see positions outside the company and i am giving myself 6 months to move if the current opportunity doesnot go through.
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Nov 2, 2013
5624 posts
1486 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
ilovetoyota wrote: Edmonton is a city without multiculturalism while Vancouver can ensure people from different part of the world to enjoy the same right, same happiness.
It depends on where you are in Edmonton. Different ethic groups tend to cluster in select areas, especially in the north - though the north compared to the rest, is somewhat comparable to east vs. west Vancouver.
Living in Vancouver is the best way to catch the rising economy of China, Vietnam and India.
That's why it has become so expensive, and hard to get ahead if you can't capture those. Not a problem if you don't mind of course.
If you miss Edmonton, you can move back to there after your retire. With the money you gain from salary hike, house price hike, you can live like a king in Edmonton after you retire.
What a lot of people do is make their money in Alberta (or Asia, or elsewhere), and then live on their downtime in BC. Since in BC, it's a lot harder to make money.
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Sr. Member
Dec 15, 2017
885 posts
1036 upvotes
ilovetoyota wrote: definitely worth it!

Edmonton is a city without multiculturalism while Vancouver can ensure people from different part of the world to enjoy the same right, same happiness.

To me, multiculturalism worth about 200K a year.

For housing, you should think in this way. If you buy a house in Vancouver now for 1.3 million, it will appreciate to 4 million in 10 years. But if you buy a house in Edmonton now, it probably going to worth the same price after 10 years. Living in Vancouver is the best way to catch the rising economy of China, Vietnam and India.

If you miss Edmonton, you can move back to there after your retire. With the money you gain from salary hike, house price hike, you can live like a king in Edmonton after you retire.
I think that logic is flawed, no guarantee that RE is going to triple in the next decade in Vancouver, that's speculation. Housing prices in Edmonton are going to likely stay with inflation but the equity you build becomes locked in. I'm 34, bought a 450k house in Edmonton, that mortgage is already "paid". The goal is now to buy an Arizona home to snowbird. I think that's what a lot of people in Alberta work towards, early retirement somewhere nicer.

200k a year for multiculturalism....I could retire and travel the world for that much.
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Nov 2, 2013
5624 posts
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Edmonton, AB
glenn9090 wrote:
Cant predict the career prospects. No big promotions at least for 5 years. I am stuck with this for next 5 years. The manager told that as you go up on this position, there are less opportunities as eventually I will get a chance if someone retires or someone quit the job.
No one actually knows what will precisely happen within the next 5 years.
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