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kitchen p-trap disintegrated-floor/water damage

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  • Oct 6th, 2020 11:47 am
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Deal Expert
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Feb 11, 2007
15403 posts
16495 upvotes
Oakville
l69norm wrote: There are pretty stringent flammability/ smoke spread requirements in the building code for any plastic based construction materials used in high rise construction (non combustible construction)
3.1.5.16. Combustible Piping Materials
(1) Except as permitted by Clause 3.1.5.2.(1)(d) , Sentences (2) and (3), and Article 3.1.5.22., combustible piping and tubing and associated adhesives are permitted to be used in a building required to be of noncombustible construction provided that, except when concealed in a wall or concrete floor slab, they,
(a) have a flame-spread rating not more than 25, and
(b) if used in a building described in Subsection 3.2.6., have a smoke developed classification not more than 50.

3.1.5.2. Minor Combustible Components
(1) The following minor combustible components are permitted in a building required to be of noncombustible construction:
(a) paint,
(b) mastics and caulking materials applied to provide flexible seals between the major components of exterior wall construction,
(c) fire stop materials conforming to Sentence 3.1.9.1.(1) and Article 3.1.11.7.,
(d) tubing for pneumatic controls provided it has an outside diameter not more than 10mm,
(e) adhesives, vapour barriers and sheathing papers,
(f) electrical outlet and junction boxes,
(g) wood blocking within wall assemblies intended for the attachment of handrails, fixtures, and similar items mounted on the surface of the wall, and
(h) similar minor components.
So is the whole building made with the same crappy metal pipes? That's a disaster waiting to happen. Flooding can also start electrical fires.
It wouldn't be cheap, but they could make that pipe out of PEEK, which is good enough for aerospace flammability ratings.
Deal Expert
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Jun 12, 2007
15944 posts
4804 upvotes
London
engineered wrote: So is the whole building made with the same crappy metal pipes? That's a disaster waiting to happen. Flooding can also start electrical fires.
It wouldn't be cheap, but they could make that pipe out of PEEK, which is good enough for aerospace flammability ratings.
Here's where you can request a change in the Building Code:

https://nrc.canada.ca/en/certifications ... ode-change
Member
Dec 26, 2012
258 posts
225 upvotes
TORONTO
i was in a condo until last year and i had the same issue with my copper/brass (who knows) P-trap. It completely flaked away to nothing at the bottom. The plumber looked at it and looked at the age of the building and assumed maybe the previous owners used drano monthly on it.

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