Computers & Electronics

Laptop for photo and video editing

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  • Feb 28th, 2020 9:32 pm
[OP]
Newbie
User avatar
May 7, 2012
55 posts
13 upvotes
Mississauga

Laptop for photo and video editing

Hello, I am in market to buy a new laptop for new hobby of photo and video editing. I have 2011 MBP but I am open for windows laptop. As you may see it will be a purchase nearly after 10 yrs. I see this config recommended by lot of photography related websites: i7, 16gb ram, 4gb gpu (raedeon 1650), ssd and higher resolution. There are so many laptops in the market but most stores keep basic or low config in displays. I like laptop which is fast, no noise, good keyboard and least interruption from OS updates. Let me know any recommendations for a budget of upto 1500 cad.
Thread Summary
Laptop for photo and video editing
6 replies
Member
User avatar
Aug 23, 2019
402 posts
286 upvotes
Do you want a 4K/UHD display? that will probably be over $1500 but you likely won't be able to tell between that and 1080p on a 14/15" screen anyway.

you could also wait til july for AMD laptops that might be cheaper.

maybe a Dell? https://www.techspot.com/products/lapto ... 70.183548/

Edit: actually for $1500 id just look at hot deals section and wait for a good deal. but you've missed the sales season so slim pickings for a few months.. probably.
Jr. Member
Sep 30, 2015
161 posts
31 upvotes
York, ON
I use ipad pro 10.5 inch and Affinity photo for editing. With ios13, photos can be organized by folders just like a laptop. I need a sd card reader so I can get the photos into the ipad. If I want I can attach an external ssd. I used to carry my laptop with me when travelling, but this is much better as far as weight and size is concerned. Affinity is a very capable photo editor, and it is not expensive like Lightroom, etc. In fact, I do not use my laptop anymore. The new ipad pro are more powerful than what I have. I suggest you go to an apple store and give it a spin.
Member
Apr 9, 2012
428 posts
323 upvotes
Wirecutter Opinion/Info Read the entire article & any user opinions. Its just info not the holy grail. There are other options out there.

IME it depends on your need for speed & compromises & original from camera format & file sizes & what your output files are to be.

A 2011 Mac should be more than capable. Heck professionally I still use PS CS4 & some other software on an equally old Windows machine that I got for $100 with 4 GB RAM & an old i5 & a 2014 laptop with an i7 12 GB RAM for RAW & or jpeg image processing & many output sizes & formats. Adding SSDs to both machines REALLY increased machine speeds, $50 for 1 SSD & $90 for the other.

OS upgrades dont need to be invasive, set them to occur in the background, though reboots are needed on occassion, like fuel fill ups for phones, or cars, or food breaks for you. W10 also increased performance from Vista, W7, W8, etc. & were all free. Updates & learning are the price to play, just learn to do it or stop using technology.

Meanwhile a wealthier acquaintance that only shoots lousy composed & exposed low res jpegs for tiny web use just wasted $3800+ on a 16" MacBookPro as he felt his similar or newer vintage macs nor ipad were good enough for his crappy images. Totally bizarre to me, I nearly vomited when I heard that.

Hardware, nor money do not beat knowledge & skill. Honestly assess yours & your inputs & your intended outputs & your expectations & then list what fits the bill or where you need to increase your knowledge & skills. Also lots of info found with youtube & web searches as your type of question is asked & answered many times a week if not per day.

But IMO & from what you have so vaguely stated, your Mac is likely more than still good enough vs your input & output knowledge & skills. Likely not what you wanted to hear, but you will still need increased knowledge & skills on any new machine or OS or software. And my acquaintance with the new $3800 MacBook Pro will still output garbage & that machine will also soon slow down & need updates & skill & knowledge to prevent degradation, which he does not have & will not learn.
Deal Addict
Feb 16, 2006
4250 posts
1314 upvotes
Vancouver
For image editing it is all about the gamut coverage of the screen. At a minimum, try for 100% but no lower than 96% of sRGB and maybe consider a wide gamut panel offering 100% of AdobeRGB or DCI. Wide gamut editing can be a challenge for people new to the hobby requiring an investment of time to understand the pitfalls and $$ in what are usually more expensive better quality software apps and perhaps hardware like a colorimeter.

Check out the reviews with gamut charts at >> https://www.notebookcheck.net/

You may be surprised at how some big name brands with IPS type panels can have such low coverage of the basic sRGB colour space (some under 60%). I see this particularly with laptops marketed for gaming - they are appealing for image editing as they have all the other hardware that speeds things up but oh!!.... that screen!! Ugh!! Use only with an external monitor only accurate editing.

I would get a laptop with a discrete GPU (hopefully offering a dedicated LUT for each graphics port) and explore laptops with charging USB-C ports that can support multiple external monitors.

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Member
Apr 9, 2012
428 posts
323 upvotes
NewsyL wrote: For image editing it is all about the gamut coverage of the screen. At a minimum, try for 100% but no lower than 96% of sRGB ...
Good advice but given how vague the OP's info is, I'd guess it's completely over their head as otherwise they would know already what to look for & where & would have no need for suggestions.

Added to your suggestions would be the addition of hardware & software calibration as otherwise a display with good gamut could be useless & misrepresentative as a cheap low quality display, both uncalibrated & without a colour managed workflow. We have no info of what the OP knows or is doing.

As well, there is zero info on the type of input image file & intended editing output needs. For all we know, it could be a closed loop of editing from smartphone output to smarphone viewing, few of which have decent displays or ability to be calibrated or colour managed. So then what would the point be of having a high quality full gamut display?

I wish people woukd stop being so vague when asking for help as it makes giving appropriate info often a waste of time. A Google search & lots of reading would help more & return better results & waste less time.
Deal Addict
Feb 16, 2006
4250 posts
1314 upvotes
Vancouver
Well, that is why I wrote what I did. To ensure they were aware of these issues, particularly with Windows OS laptops. To perhaps provoke the OP into asking additional questions or sharing more info. Just trying to make this a community that is more than troll country.

The OP did say it was a "NEW" hobby and that he has been browsing photography websites and he does have some idea of Windows hardware so credit given where credit is due. With an unlimited budget you can probably get it right the first time but with a limited budget you have to pay attention to a few points. The current Apple MBP is an easy suggestion but pricey. Might be worth it to him though to finance it over a long term and therefore stay in an OS\ecosystem he knows.

The OP should go over to the Art & Photography forum and scroll through the threads there.

Here >> art-photography-f89/

and the DP Review forums >> https://www.dpreview.com/forums

particularly the PC Talk, Mac Talk, Printers & Printing, and Retouching forums.

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