Expired Hot Deals

[Le Creuset] Le Creuset 2.6 L Square Casserole $59 (Reg: $130!)

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 10th, 2020 7:09 pm
[OP]
Newbie
User avatar
Feb 12, 2015
31 posts
44 upvotes
Montreal, QC

Le Creuset 2.6 L Square Casserole $59 (Reg: $130!)

Deal Link:
Price:
$59.00
Retailer:
Le Creuset
Hello,

Noticed there was a sale going on at Le Creuset. Always wanted one of these square casseroles. Picked one up!

They are selling regular @ $ 130.00 and on Indigo at the moment for $ 104.00 HOT DEAL!

Check out their other specials, they might have something you may like :)
Last edited by kalifornialove1306 on Mar 8th, 2020 11:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
14 replies
Deal Addict
Mar 13, 2012
1259 posts
1218 upvotes
Surrey
COUNTRY OF ORIGIN CHINA hmm

Material : STONEWARE
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 3, 2005
1817 posts
821 upvotes
Scarborough
good price.

yes, stoneware is made in China. only cast iron is made in France.
Sr. Member
Dec 17, 2014
639 posts
188 upvotes
Thought it was all made in France. Learn something new everyday.
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Aug 21, 2009
2196 posts
1317 upvotes
North Vancouver
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Member
Dec 7, 2019
386 posts
252 upvotes
You can deliver it in store for free shipping

Sam
Be the change you want to see.
Deal Addict
Apr 1, 2017
1219 posts
1907 upvotes
Not sure if they still have it now, but as far as 2014 their ceramic glazes contained elevated levels of cadmium and/or lead, especially in bright colours and with vintage Le Creusets. The company made no warning (!) and just quietly replaced them for people who asked.

Later they phased out lead, but till now still uses high levels of cadmium for the colours. They said their cookware passed CA Prop 65 which is a test for heavy metals leaching into acidic solution. However, they only passed in brand new state. As you use the cookware, the ceramic glaze will wear out, get scratched or chipped. The high levels of heavy metal will then leach into your food.

Certainly not a risk I'd take but if you want to use them, please throw them out once the ceramic glaze gets scratched or worn. Treat them as you would non-stick pans/pots.
Blowing all savings from RFD on deals from RFD 😂
Jr. Member
User avatar
Feb 25, 2018
135 posts
217 upvotes
Toronto
aintic wrote: Not sure if they still have it now, but as far as 2014 their ceramic glazes contained elevated levels of cadmium and/or lead, especially in bright colours and with vintage Le Creusets. The company made no warning (!) and just quietly replaced them for people who asked.

Later they phased out lead, but till now still uses high levels of cadmium for the colours. They said their cookware passed CA Prop 65 which is a test for heavy metals leaching into acidic solution. However, they only passed in brand new state. As you use the cookware, the ceramic glaze will wear out, get scratched or chipped. The high levels of heavy metal will then leach into your food.

Certainly not a risk I'd take but if you want to use them, please throw them out once the ceramic glaze gets scratched or worn. Treat them as you would non-stick pans/pots.
Do you have any evidence backing up the information you're saying? Not that I am saying you're wrong. But I would like to read the research on it. Considering I bought a Le Creuset back in 2013.
Deal Addict
Apr 1, 2017
1219 posts
1907 upvotes
davidr519 wrote: Do you have any evidence backing up the information you're saying? Not that I am saying you're wrong. But I would like to read the research on it. Considering I bought a Le Creuset back in 2013.
Tamara Rubin, in the link below, is an independent consumer goods tester trained to use XRF, which is a scientific method used by the U.S Consumer Product Safety Commission. She tests things people send in, including cookware, toys, fixtures, small appliances etc

Here are the list of Le Creuset items tested. The brightly coloured Le Creusets usually contain more toxicants. For lead, 90ppm is unsafe for children. For cadmium around 40ppm.

The most elevated levels of lead and cadmium are on the exterior, however the interior does have unsafe levels as well, just not as much. Those amounts are not merely trace amount (naturally existing in raw materials). They were added as a part of manufacturing process and no toxic heavy metals should be added to things we cook, touch, serve and eat from daily.

Note that most regulations and third party testing by manufacturers check for leachable amount of heavy metals in brand new state. Many brands pass with flying colours this way. However, as mentioned, ceramics and ceramic glazes get chipped, scratched and worn. There's no telling how much heavy metals gets leached over time. She tests for the actual amount instead for this reason.

Also, vintage cookware and tableware could be significantly more toxic. Check out vintage Pyrex, Corningware, Corelle, Wedgwood, etc. In fact, most vintage ceramics, enamel, china really. If you have kitchenware from previous generations, consider using them as decorations only.
Blowing all savings from RFD on deals from RFD 😂
Jr. Member
User avatar
Feb 25, 2018
135 posts
217 upvotes
Toronto
aintic wrote: Tamara Rubin, in the link below, is an independent consumer goods tester trained to use XRF, which is a scientific method used by the U.S Consumer Product Safety Commission. She tests things people send in, including cookware, toys, fixtures, small appliances etc

Here are the list of Le Creuset items tested. The brightly coloured Le Creusets usually contain more toxicants. For lead, 90ppm is unsafe for children. For cadmium around 40ppm.

The most elevated levels of lead and cadmium are on the exterior, however the interior does have unsafe levels as well, just not as much. Those amounts are not merely trace amount (naturally existing in raw materials). They were added as a part of manufacturing process and no toxic heavy metals should be added to things we cook, touch, serve and eat from daily.

Note that most regulations and third party testing by manufacturers check for leachable amount of heavy metals in brand new state. Many brands pass with flying colours this way. However, as mentioned, ceramics and ceramic glazes get chipped, scratched and worn. There's no telling how much heavy metals gets leached over time. She tests for the actual amount instead for this reason.

Also, vintage cookware and tableware could be significantly more toxic. Check out vintage Pyrex, Corningware, Corelle, Wedgwood, etc. In fact, most vintage ceramics, enamel, china really. If you have kitchenware from previous generations, consider using them as decorations only.
Thank you, I really appreciate it!
Sr. Member
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Oct 20, 2003
625 posts
87 upvotes
warning noted and in for one Caribbean
RFD brings out the m00t in everyone!
Jr. Member
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Oct 26, 2008
146 posts
68 upvotes
Toronto
hmm, well that's somehting to be aware of.
Got the bluberry dish.
Sr. Member
Jul 25, 2010
593 posts
415 upvotes
Vancouver
Tempting just to get as a decorative piece for kitchen

Or maybe to hold sweets on my desk

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