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Leads for New Electrical Technologist grads?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 21st, 2012 9:12 pm
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[OP]
Newbie
May 25, 2012
24 posts
1 upvote
BARRIE
Ascott wrote: That isn't strictly true, and you should really stop treating it like some sort of obvious benefit. The way the educations are handled are different between Alberta and Ontario. Looking at some of Georgian College's ET courses, the actual course load is the same, smaller in some cases. And while the courses in Alberta don't have required work terms, most students do work during the summer semesters and several through the academic semesters. There's also a 6-8 month practical project sponsored by a corporate partner (A few companies seek out students, but most students have to find companies to sponsor them) in addition to the normal course load.

You're also ignoring that most of the companies in Alberta that your husband will be applying to sponsor the technical programs in Alberta and have had input on their curriculum.
Also, a three year diploma over a two year diploma is an OBVIOUS benefit. How could it not be???I Its GUARANTEEING that even the dumbest person who god knows how they made it through, is going to have a full year of relevant work experience compared to an Alberta trained CET who may/may not have any experience dependant on how motivated they are!

People on this site are so argumentative.
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Feb 15, 2008
26318 posts
3217 upvotes
Calgary
squagles wrote: That's all fine, but you were implying it was the union that was preventing your company from hiring people with engineering degrees, and that isn't true. That was a choice management made.
Actually it is the union contract, and the legislation, that pretty much forces management's hand. For the reasons I explained. No point in repeating myself.

Few firms are going to spend $50k-$100k in legal fees and staff time in a grievance/arbitration process with a union, simply to hire a management P.Eng. instead of a qualified C.E.T. into a job that calls for a CET. That's why the Engineers' resumes are thrown in the garbage when they apply to positions for technologists. Which gives a EET/CET a big leg up since Engineers are not fungible with technologists at those employers.

To the OP: definitely get your resume into the Alberta utilities, they're looking for folks such as you describe all the time, and have very few applicants.
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Deal Addict
Jul 14, 2010
2329 posts
357 upvotes
jacksmomma27 wrote: Thats just like it is in Ontario. Hydro One sponsored his program. I am noy bashing Alberta, but lets be honest there education systems SUCK compared to Ontario's. You can become a Registered Social Worker with only 2 years exoerience compared to the at least 4+ years it takes in Ontario.....and overall LESS people are attending post secondary school in Alberta as opposed to Ontario so of course there going to throw all there money into promoting trades!
Ontario has roughly four times the population of Alberta and roughly four times the post secondary attendance. It's also laughably ignorant to assume most of the funding goes to trades, but whatever - ignorance is bliss.

And the point I was making wasn't that the Ontario programs weren't sponsored - it was that the companies employing people in Alberta didn't sponsor them. They've had no say in what he learned or how, where as those same companies know a CET (Or similar) from an Alberta school has learned what they wanted and how they wanted it.
jacksmomma27 wrote: Also, a three year diploma over a two year diploma is an OBVIOUS benefit. How could it not be???I Its GUARANTEEING that even the dumbest person who god knows how they made it through, is going to have a full year of relevant work experience compared to an Alberta trained CET who may/may not have any experience dependant on how motivated they are!

People on this site are so argumentative.
I'm not arguing with you. I'm trying to keep you from being over confident and arrogant and invariably not understanding why your husband would even be competing with Alberta trained CET's. Completing a three year program isn't an obvious benefit when none of it was specifically aligned with industry requirements or wishes, and you're ignoring that most Alberta students spend 6-8 months working for an employer on a practical project. This isn't something the schools make up - they barely even grade it (beyond documentation quality). You spend that time both attending to your normal credit load and working directly for an employer on whatever project they may have (I designed and built a prototype piece of equipment for a cable manufacturer, for example).
[OP]
Newbie
May 25, 2012
24 posts
1 upvote
BARRIE
Ascott wrote: Ontario has roughly four times the population of Alberta and roughly four times the post secondary attendance. It's also laughably ignorant to assume most of the funding goes to trades, but whatever - ignorance is bliss.

And the point I was making wasn't that the Ontario programs weren't sponsored - it was that the companies employing people in Alberta didn't sponsor them. They've had no say in what he learned or how, where as those same companies know a CET (Or similar) from an Alberta school has learned what they wanted and how they wanted it.



I'm not arguing with you. I'm trying to keep you from being over confident and arrogant and invariably not understanding why your husband would even be competing with Alberta trained CET's. Completing a three year program isn't an obvious benefit when none of it was specifically aligned with industry requirements or wishes, and you're ignoring that most Alberta students spend 6-8 months working for an employer on a practical project. This isn't something the schools make up - they barely even grade it (beyond documentation quality). You spend that time both attending to your normal credit load and working directly for an employer on whatever project they may have (I designed and built a prototype piece of equipment for a cable manufacturer, for example).
I clearly touched a nerve now that I know I insulted you and your two year diploma. But honestly, knowing you workerd for 6-8 months within your two years means way less time in the classroom. So a quick glance at the Georgian outline and you tell me that some of what he learned is less thorough I would love to know exactly how you came to that conclusion! But I see where your coming from for sure. ITs the same here I guess- They will take a graudate of a sponsored Ontario program for an Ontario job before they take an Alberta grad.
Deal Addict
Jul 14, 2010
2329 posts
357 upvotes
jacksmomma27 wrote: I clearly touched a nerve now that I know I insulted you and your two year diploma. But honestly, knowing you workerd for 6-8 months within your two years means way less time in the classroom. So a quick glance at the Georgian outline and you tell me that some of what he learned is less thorough I would love to know exactly how you came to that conclusion! But I see where your coming from for sure. ITs the same here I guess- They will take a graudate of a sponsored Ontario program for an Ontario job before they take an Alberta grad.
You don't seem to have understood a lot of what I said.

I never said what your husband had learned was less thorough - I have no idea what the actual course content is for his diploma. Also, I did look at the outlines for a number of the Georgian ET courses (As I said earlier) and the course load is more or less identical to their Alberta counter parts with some swapping and replacing of COM and MNGT courses. How that would specifically impact volume or quantity of the course material I don't know - The credit hours are denser in the Alberta courses. The project doesn't mean less time in the class room - it's taken on in addition to 32 credit hours per week. It's more or less a substitute for the summer work semesters. There's less time invested and the atmosphere is completely different, but I'd assume the intent is the same.

And that's the point I was trying to make - if I applied in Ontario I'd expect to have to fight tooth and nail to stand a chance against your husband. He's going to have a rougher go of it in Alberta for the same reasons. It's not that he won't find work. He probably won't even have to look for that long. Just don't assume that he's going to end up at the front of every interview queue of every position he applies for because he took a longer diploma.
Sr. Member
Mar 9, 2008
739 posts
86 upvotes
Winnipeg
The government utilities will take anyone and they're begging for people.

OP, have you tried MB Hydro/Sask Hydro? I know you specifically said Alberta, but these companies (located in MB and SK respectfully) are hiring all the time. The typical wage is $35/hr and goes up from there.

Engineering technologists make REALLY good money. I know an electronics technologist who makes over $100K a year living in Ottawa.

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