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Leaking bathroof exhaust at connection with roof

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  • Apr 13th, 2018 6:07 pm
[OP]
Member
Apr 7, 2014
230 posts
76 upvotes
Whitby, ON

Leaking bathroof exhaust at connection with roof

Went to attic to check on some noise and I found the wood is wet below the exhaust connection with the roof, photo attached.
Is this a problem that is fixed from the underside or from the top?.. I'm not sure how this system works. I see screws I can take out to remove the metal plate, but I don't know what's underneath.
I'm wondering if there is anything I can fix from underside, and what type of seals hold the water away? Is it rubber, etc?..

I'm quite sure this is not condensation.. there was some yellow insulation wrapped around the top of the pipe that I took off to see what's going on. It looks like the water is coming from the plate, and we haven't used the fan recently either.

Thanks!
Images
  • P2150002.JPG
34 replies
Deal Guru
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Dec 11, 2004
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Montreal, QC
Hot air tends to rises up regarless you use the fan or not, when it contact with the cold will condense, does the fan have an air register?
What does it looks like on the other side/roof?
[OP]
Member
Apr 7, 2014
230 posts
76 upvotes
Whitby, ON
Daijoubu wrote: Hot air tends to rises up regarless you use the fan or not, when it contact with the cold will condense, does the fan have an air register?
What does it looks like on the other side/roof?
How do i tell if the fan has a register? I think it does. when I turn it on I hear a faint click, and when turning it off too .. that should be the flapper that opens/closes.

On the outside there's too much snow to get a good photo, but it looks like the photo attached , although that one is open on the underside, just to vent the attic.

Is this the proper vent type for bathroom fans? I see other people place one that aims downwards and newer homes have that too.
Images
  • vent.jpg
[OP]
Member
Apr 7, 2014
230 posts
76 upvotes
Whitby, ON
I removed the duct, so now I can see the bottom half of the exhaust hole has wetness around it.
It looks like it might be coming through a nail, or possibly there is not enough silicone..

One part of the metal that was punctured by a nail is rusted for 1 inch around, making me think that's where the water was entering from..

Looking down through the vent I can see there is no silicone on the bottom, but I think this is normal, they silicone the top, left and right, but not bottom... The top/left/right looks okay, but half way down the hole it starts to be wet, so somehow moisture is getting in.
Images
  • P2150013.JPG
  • rust.jpg
Deal Guru
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Mar 23, 2008
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Edmonton
You're not going to fix this from the bottom. You need to get up on your roof and keep water from getting past the top layer (i.e. vent, shingles, etc). If you can't do that because of the snow, hire someone. Or you'll end up with mold and rotten wood.

C
[OP]
Member
Apr 7, 2014
230 posts
76 upvotes
Whitby, ON
Yes, I figured that no matter what I stop underneath, it will still end up in the wood so it won't help.
The problem is not so much the snow but that it's wet there. I'm not sure even any roofers can do anything right now?.. Silicone/glue doesn't work when wet.

Does anyone know any good roofing person in the Whitby area?
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2011
6427 posts
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Mississauga
What moron uses a regular roof vent as a bathroom exhaust vent?
[OP]
Member
Apr 7, 2014
230 posts
76 upvotes
Whitby, ON
mrweather wrote: What moron uses a regular roof vent as a bathroom exhaust vent?
The moron is called "Highmark Homes", and they did this on the entire street!
[OP]
Member
Apr 7, 2014
230 posts
76 upvotes
Whitby, ON
What I am still unsure of is the source of water... The screws for the sheet metal seem to be longer than the thickness of the wood by 2-3mm. I wonder if they pierced anything above..

Also, the cutout in the wood is not aligned with the vent very well, it's basically 30% blocked, so the warm air will hit the vent edge instead of going straight out.. I always noticed this exhaust fan doesn't exhaust very well compared to others in the house. That could create condensation that accumulates exactly in the spot where it's most wet.. right at the bottom.

I think I should enlarge the cutout in the wood upwards, and move the vent pipe up to match the exhaust hole and see if the moisture issue continues. I think this problem is occurring only the winter because we never had leaks in the house when it rains hard, and even now I just saw this because I was in the attic, no leak in the house.

I can also tape closed the exhaust fan in the bathroom and see if the moisture still continues, then I will know for sure it's not from condensation.
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Oct 14, 2010
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Barrie ON
sailplane wrote: The problem is not so much the snow but that it's wet there. I'm not sure even any roofers can do anything right now?.. Silicone/glue doesn't work when wet.
THIS stuff should work. The description from the HD web page says.............................

Designed for fast, year round repair of leaky roofs, peeled back shingles, leaks around flashings. Adheres to wet or frozen surfaces. Fibre reinforced, brush grade formulation allows for use in cold temperatures. Available in 300ml cartridge

year round usage
brush grade
use to -12C
Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2006
12281 posts
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Brampton
mrweather wrote: What moron uses a regular roof vent as a bathroom exhaust vent?
It's not uncommon to do this these days. It's not as ideal as say something like this


But its's not unacceptable. From what it looks like it looks like in the pic this one has a damper so it's designed for this.

The problem here isn't the vent, it's the half assed install You Can tell it's not aligned at all. It's a good 2/3rd off. That's enough to cause excess condensation to cause wetness.
But excess condensation isn't the case here it's the half ass nail job they did installing the vent you can see the water is coming thru the nail.

OP you're going to want to fix this from the outside. Remove the vent and reinstall it correctly on the outside and seal it.
It might cost you a couple hundred bucks in total to get the shingles redone around the vent and get the vent done correctly. It doesn't look like the hole is too small just misaligned( Who measures it correctly and completely messed up the install?).
Deal Guru
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Dec 11, 2004
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Yeah flashing is not always done properly, hole/vent needs to be ideally located as to that the bottom edge lines up or overlap the shingles so that water flows down

Too many peoples just relies on tar/sealant to fix an improper installation

Should look like this
Image
Image
[OP]
Member
Apr 7, 2014
230 posts
76 upvotes
Whitby, ON
tebore wrote: But its's not unacceptable. From what it looks like it looks like in the pic this one has a damper so it's designed for this.

The problem here isn't the vent, it's the half assed install You Can tell it's not aligned at all. It's a good 2/3rd off. That's enough to cause excess condensation to cause wetness.
But excess condensation isn't the case here it's the half ass nail job they did installing the vent you can see the water is coming thru the nail.

OP you're going to want to fix this from the outside. Remove the vent and reinstall it correctly on the outside and seal it.
It might cost you a couple hundred bucks in total to get the shingles redone around the vent and get the vent done correctly. It doesn't look like the hole is too small just misaligned( Who measures it correctly and completely messed up the install?).
There is no damper really.. Maybe one inside the fan but probably doesn't seal too well.
I covered the opening in the bathroom with plastic sheet and tape and it's windy outside. The plastic is flapping up and down when the wind blows.

I'm not sure if that one middle nail is really the cause, because condensation would do the same thing and make everything wet. I believe that nail is covered by the vent, or even under a shingle, as the vent seems to be placed on top of the shingles on the down part. You can see the shingles in the photo attached.

I will go up and take a photo from the top to make sure there is no nail in the vent. If it is, then I can just seal that nail.
I attached a better photo showing the nails.
Images
  • vent.jpg
[OP]
Member
Apr 7, 2014
230 posts
76 upvotes
Whitby, ON
A couple of hundred would be okay.. But who to trust? One company already "estimated" $500. Usually they estimate one thing and they charge even more after.
Another person from Kijiji estimated $160, but it's just a person, no company. I heard of too many stories where things were made worse once they were touched.
If it's not leaking and just condensation I think I better just align the vent with the pipe from underneath.
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Feb 9, 2006
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Brampton
You're right looking at the pic closer there's no damper.

Ones designed for this could look like roof vents but have dampers.

You're a brave guy to go on the roof in weather like this. I know mine is slick as hell right now.
[OP]
Member
Apr 7, 2014
230 posts
76 upvotes
Whitby, ON
tebore wrote: You're right looking at the pic closer there's no damper.

Ones designed for this could look like roof vents but have dampers.

You're a brave guy to go on the roof in weather like this. I know mine is slick as hell right now.
Yes it's not the best time to do this. I wonder if it would help to add a duct that has a damper underneath?..

It's close to the eve, so I can snap a photo without stepping on the roof. I'll try to find somebody before I have to step on the roof.
Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2006
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Brampton
sailplane wrote: Yes it's not the best time to do this. I wonder if it would help to add a duct that has a damper underneath?..

It's close to the eve, so I can snap a photo without stepping on the roof. I'll try to find somebody before I have to step on the roof.
I guess you could
The most correct way is to get a vent with a damper. One preferably with a good seal.

Reducing or eliminating airflow will reduce or eliminate condensation.

If they cheaped out here they would have cheaped out on the fan. The dampers should stop air movement. But it seems like you may have a constant stream that's helped by the stack effect. So you'll be constantly losing a small amount of warm moist air from the house. I mentioned this in other threads before but another reason by Panasonic vent fans are so good isn't just the noise to flow ratio but they have an excellent damper design.
[OP]
Member
Apr 7, 2014
230 posts
76 upvotes
Whitby, ON
tebore wrote: I guess you could
The most correct way is to get a vent with a damper. One preferably with a good seal.

Reducing or eliminating airflow will reduce or eliminate condensation.
There are multiple issues with this setup. The biggest I think is that the metal plate is not sealed to the wood , and the plate is not flat, it's wrinkled, allowing air to bypass into the attic. The rust spot is exactly where the wrinkle is. A proper bathroom exhaust cover has a pipe that stick down a bit, and nothing is screwed into the wood like this. It's pretty much bad design, and hardly makes sense that this was an allowed way to do this.
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Jan 2, 2012
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OP, if you haven't had water coming in during rainfalls, you are correct that it is a condensation issue.
We are already mid way through February, so just leave it until May. Your roof is not going to rot out in three months.
Going on to even a low pitched roof at this time of year is extremely dangerous. My neighbour made that mistake, and now has limited mobility of his arm after shattering his elbow on the fence he hit on the way down. He was actually lucky, because it broke his fall somewhat.
I know it's frustrating as hell when something like this is going on, but sometimes you just have to take a step back.
[OP]
Member
Apr 7, 2014
230 posts
76 upvotes
Whitby, ON
MrFrugal1 wrote: OP, if you haven't had water coming in during rainfalls, you are correct that it is a condensation issue.
We are already mid way through February, so just leave it until May. Your roof is not going to rot out in three months.
Going on to even a low pitched roof at this time of year is extremely dangerous. My neighbour made that mistake, and now has limited mobility of his arm after shattering his elbow on the fence he hit on the way down. He was actually lucky, because it broke his fall somewhat.
I know it's frustrating as hell when something like this is going on, but sometimes you just have to take a step back.
Yes I've heard stories like this, I'm not going up there. I found an independent guy "Steve" on Kijiji that seems to know what he's talking about and quoted around $160. He was quick to tell me I need a vent with a damper, showed me how he would install it, and said he has insurance and guarantee for 3 years..

Other businesses I contacted were not even as knowledgeable as this one guy.. One told me to put a turbine on the roof for $400 and does not guarantee moisture will stop. Another quoted around $500 and said "for sure" the problem is with the roof and maybe some shingles are damaged.

I am tempted to just wait until May anyway so whoever goes up there can do a better job. Even if they know what they are doing, it's always better to be warm while working, especially if they have to bend any shingles.

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