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Leaking shut-off valve. How to fix?

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  • May 16th, 2021 7:11 pm
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[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 15, 2009
181 posts
42 upvotes

Leaking shut-off valve. How to fix?

Hi RFD,

New homeowner here, and I loosened off the shut-off valve from the basement to my garage faucet today. I'm finding that the part of the valve that I circled is leaking when I open the valve fully. I thought it might go away after a minute or two but it kept leaking (consistent drops of water). The handle also leaked water for a little bit, but it went away after 5-10 seconds. I've since tightened the valve again. For context, right before winter came I tightened the shut off valve and there were no problems at that point.

I've been trying to search for videos of how to fix this, but I can't find exactly what this part of the valve is called. It looks like I could simply try to tighten this part of the valve with a wrench or something, but wanted to get some second opinions here before I go ahead and make things worse.

Thanks in advance!

Edit: Didn't look close enough, could have posted in the plumbing thread but I can't delete this thread now
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Last edited by ah_b on May 15th, 2021 2:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
15 replies
Jr. Member
Aug 17, 2011
172 posts
132 upvotes
TORONTO
I can at least tell you that’s a bleeder valve. Not sure what the fix is if leaking...
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 13, 2008
5092 posts
1998 upvotes
ah_b wrote: Hi RFD,

New homeowner here, and I loosened off the shut-off valve from the basement to my garage faucet today. I'm finding that the part of the valve that I circled is leaking when I open the valve fully. I thought it might go away after a minute or two but it kept leaking (consistent drops of water). The handle also leaked water for a little bit, but it went away after 5-10 seconds. I've since tightened the valve again. For context, right before winter came I tightened the shut off valve and there were no problems at that point.

I've been trying to search for videos of how to fix this, but I can't find exactly what this part of the valve is called. It looks like I could simply try to tighten this part of the valve with a wrench or something, but wanted to get some second opinions here before I go ahead and make things worse.

Thanks in advance!

Edit: Didn't look close enough, could have posted in the plumbing thread but I can't delete this thread now
Call a plumber. Easiest way to fix.

If you do it yourself .. don't do it correctly ... you'll be swimming.
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Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
4306 posts
2202 upvotes
There should be a little rubber gasket inside that cap. If it's gone you might be able to cut one out of a bicycle tube or something or stuff it pull of graphite packing.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 15, 2009
181 posts
42 upvotes
pootza wrote: There should be a little rubber gasket inside that cap. If it's gone you might be able to cut one out of a bicycle tube or something or stuff it pull of graphite packing.
Hi pootza,

Cap! That's the word I'm looking for. So would your suggestion be:

1) Leave the shut off valve closed
2) Unscrew the cap circled in the photo
3) Replace gasket inside the cap? I don't have a bicycle tube or graphite packing to replace the gasket inside.

Is it possible to just buy a new cap and replace the old cap completely? I'm assuming as long as the valve is closed I could unscrew and replace that cap easily?
Newbie
May 26, 2020
31 posts
22 upvotes
You should be able to get a new bleeder for a few dollars
Deal Addict
Apr 18, 2005
2794 posts
1158 upvotes
Mississauga
You could try a single round of Teflon on the threads and then screw on the cap.
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
4306 posts
2202 upvotes
ah_b wrote: Hi pootza,

Cap! That's the word I'm looking for. So would your suggestion be:

1) Leave the shut off valve closed
2) Unscrew the cap circled in the photo
3) Replace gasket inside the cap? I don't have a bicycle tube or graphite packing to replace the gasket inside.

Is it possible to just buy a new cap and replace the old cap completely? I'm assuming as long as the valve is closed I could unscrew and replace that cap easily?
You must have a rubber glove or medical gloves you can cut up ... hell we're in the middle of a pandemic. Put some silicone in it. How about a condom or a balloon.
If you can find a new bleeder cap the valve you have is made by Emco.
Jr. Member
Aug 17, 2011
172 posts
132 upvotes
TORONTO
I know it’s RFD and all but just go buy a new one, they’re $2 for 2 at crappy tire, search “bleeder cap”.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 10, 2005
9921 posts
3434 upvotes
TLSRULZ wrote: You could try a single round of Teflon on the threads and then screw on the cap.
“...because most of what we say and do is not essential. If you can eliminate it, you'll have more time and more tranquility. Ask yourself at every moment, is this necessary…” -Marcus Aurelius
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
4306 posts
2202 upvotes
willdaman wrote: I know it’s RFD and all but just go buy a new one, they’re $2 for 2 at crappy tire, search “bleeder cap”.
Yes, one size fits all ... just like leotards.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 15, 2009
181 posts
42 upvotes
JC00000 wrote: You should be able to get a new bleeder for a few dollars
pootza wrote: Yes, one size fits all ... just like leotards.
So to summarize:

1) Pick up any "bleeder cap" from CT or HD since they are all standard (i.e. https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/plum ... p.html#srp)
2) Ensure the valve is closed
3) Remove the existing cap and replace with the old cap. Make sure it's as tight as it can be
4) Turn the valve on

I can do all this without having to turn off the main water line, as long as the valve is closed.
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
4306 posts
2202 upvotes
ah_b wrote: So to summarize:

1) Pick up any "bleeder cap" from CT or HD since they are all standard (i.e. https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/plum ... p.html#srp)
2) Ensure the valve is closed
3) Remove the existing cap and replace with the old cap. Make sure it's as tight as it can be
4) Turn the valve on

I can do all this without having to turn off the main water line, as long as the valve is closed.
Not all bleed caps will have the same thread.
And you don't tighten as tight as can be as it has a rubber gasket inside ... you'll wreck the gasket.
The description from Canadian Tire says it fit's their valves ... so take your old one in and see if that fits their valves as well.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 15, 2009
181 posts
42 upvotes
pootza wrote: Not all bleed caps will have the same thread.
And you don't tighten as tight as can be as it has a rubber gasket inside ... you'll wreck the gasket.
The description from Canadian Tire says it fit's their valves ... so take your old one in and see if that fits their valves as well.
It's safe to remove from as long as I keep the valve shut off? Guess I'll have to go do some bleeder cap shopping, although with everything curb-side pickup it might be more difficult than normal..
Deal Guru
User avatar
Sep 1, 2005
14233 posts
9014 upvotes
Markham
Half of the "battle" is knowing the terminology. Once you get that, then you can search for more specific fixes.

So I google "leaking bladder valve" and I get a URINARY INCONTINANCE results LOL.
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!

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