Automotive

Lift points for trolley jack?

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  • Nov 22nd, 2020 9:21 pm
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Lift points for trolley jack?

Hi everyone, this is probably a stupid question so downvote away if you must.
Last winter I did a tire changeover for the first time but I just used the scissor jack that came with my car. I've got a trolley jack now so that it's quicker/easier but I'm wondering if I'm suppose to use the same lifting points (the 4 pinch welds) as the scissor jack? Or is there a different place?

I drive an Elantra. And yes I've checked my manual but it only gave the lift points for the scissor jack.

Thanks!
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I lift my Armada from the bottom mount of the coil springs.

Can't get it high enough to get the tires off the ground using the frame.
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A quick search shows that the Elantra does not have central floor jack points like most other vehicles. Only the side points which are intended for the emergency jack, or a hoist.
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derass wrote: A quick search shows that the Elantra does not have central floor jack points like most other vehicles. Only the side points which are intended for the emergency jack, or a hoist.
That's what I was afraid of. That seems so silly! I wonder what other Elantra users do then (or ppl who have cars that also has no jack spot).

I was thinking of just getting a pinch weld adapter like this:
Image
Anyone have experience with these?
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Pinch welds are good, especially if thats whats in the manual.

What "trolley jack" did you buy?
crystallight wrote: Hi everyone, this is probably a stupid question so downvote away if you must.
Last winter I did a tire changeover for the first time but I just used the scissor jack that came with my car. I've got a trolley jack now so that it's quicker/easier but I'm wondering if I'm suppose to use the same lifting points (the 4 pinch welds) as the scissor jack? Or is there a different place?

I drive an Elantra. And yes I've checked my manual but it only gave the lift points for the scissor jack.

Thanks!
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Sep 3, 2005
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I've always used the pinch welds to lift my car up, and work on it. I've had all of my cars on jack stands supported by the pinch welds. Never had an issue with any car i've owned. I could see this the pinch welds rusting out on older cars, but i see no other issues than that. If it is rusted out, then yeah look for anothet spot to lift the car up. If the pinch welds have no issues, i'd definitely say use them.
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I wouldn't bother with that adapter. The jack will be fine by itself. But if you want to get underneath the car (like for an oil change) you need to use jack stands. And you can't lift from the side point, and place a jack stand under it at the same time.

I'm seeing that Elantra owners are using the front and rear subframes as central points.

In my experience, you won't be able to get at those with a trolley jack. You'll need a long-reach, low-profile jack. Like this:

https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/moto ... #store=675
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Aug 23, 2014
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crystallight wrote: That's what I was afraid of. That seems so silly! I wonder what other Elantra users do then (or ppl who have cars that also has no jack spot).

I was thinking of just getting a pinch weld adapter like this:
Image
Anyone have experience with these?
This is what I do with my mazda (lift at pinch welds using a trolley jack), using a similar adapter. Never had any issues.
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Always test your jack before you start what you want to do, especially if your jack can't lift high enough to put a jack stand under or if you just want to cheat and lift the car just enough to change your tire, but jacks can fail anytime even if you test it before hand.

To expand on the A1 Auto video,

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[OP]
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sickcars wrote: Pinch welds are good, especially if thats whats in the manual.

What "trolley jack" did you buy?
The manual only mentions using a scissor jack with the pinch welds. And everywhere I read online says to NOT use them with floor/trolley jacks as it'll cause the pinch welds to basically cave in/bend/fold.

I have a trolley jack that looks like this:
Image
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phuviano wrote: I've always used the pinch welds to lift my car up, and work on it. I've had all of my cars on jack stands supported by the pinch welds. Never had an issue with any car i've owned. I could see this the pinch welds rusting out on older cars, but i see no other issues than that. If it is rusted out, then yeah look for anothet spot to lift the car up. If the pinch welds have no issues, i'd definitely say use them.
What kind of jack are you using with the pinch welds? And how are you getting the jack stands under the pinch welds?...wouldn't the jack be in the way?
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crystallight wrote: What kind of jack are you using with the pinch welds? And how are you getting the jack stands under the pinch welds?...wouldn't the jack be in the way?
I've always owned a floor jack, never owned a trolley jack. No the jack doesn't get in the way. If you put the jack a bit further away from the wheel. When i put my car on 4 jack stands. I lift from the middle of pinch weld, and put 2 jack stands at a time. So either left side of the car first, then right or vice versa. I never do one corner of the car at a time.

For example, if your car is a 4 door. You put the jack under the pinch weld where the front and rear doors meet, the B pillar. Possibly a bit closer towards the front of the cars, because most cars would be front heavy, due to the engine being there.
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The ability to use a flat floor jack on your pinch welds depend on the style of pinch weld. You can see what it is by either looking at the pinch welds themselves, or looking at the scissor jack in the car.

Image

Image

The above is from a Honda Accord. As you can tell from the flat surface of the scissor jack and the pinch weld in a capital "L" shape, the scissor jack sits on the pinch weld directly. This pinch weld is also compatible with a flat floor jack and will not damage the pinch welds if used to lift the vehicle one corner at a time.

In comparison, this is the scissor jack and pinch weld from a Kia Soul

Image

Image

(Images courtesy of this thread which also has good info)

As you can see from this scissor jack and pinch welds, the scissor jack doesn't actually sit on the pinch weld, it sits on the car body surrounding the pinch weld. If you try to lift the car at this point with a flat floor jack, depending on how weak or strong the pinch weld is, it can damage and bend the pinch weld.


OP, you will need to measure the depth of the channel of your scissor jack and buy a corresponding floor jack adapter that rests on your car instead of the pinch weld. This might be better than the shallow Ebay ones

https://www.flyinmiata.com/fm-jack-adapter.html
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That's the issue with pinch welds - the groove in the scissor jack doesn't damage the car's pinch weld's metal tongue because the pressure point is moved to either side of the tongue when the scissor jack is used. Trolley jacks don't have that groove so their pressure point is directly on the tongue and they will definitely damage the pinch weld without an adapter. I learned this the hard way years ago and learned to run hockey pucks through my table saw to make adapters - and have never had problems with jacking using trolley jacks since.

I will concede that hockey pucks are not perfect adapters as they are about 1-2 cms too shallow for the job. Something like this would be perfect: https://www.amazon.ca/DEDC-Universal-Sl ... 61&sr=8-17
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Mar 23, 2004
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Yeah you can damage pinch welds with a floor/trolley jack if you're not careful. Any sideways load/movement and you can bend up the weld. Back when I was young did bend up the pinch welds on my old car here and there :rolleyes: But with better jacks (with wider saddles) and putting a medium between the saddle and the weld; making sure it's even/straight; and being careful, you can lift via the pinchweld w/o issue. Done it countless times on cars in more recent years without ever any issue. Just have to know what you're doing. Don't advise on "practising" on a newer/nicer car lol. Plus it can be dangerous as well if the car comes off the jack.

Pinch weld adapters are not 100% necessary but will make your life much easier, won't damage your car as easily, and are safer when used correctly.
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Mar 23, 2004
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crystallight wrote: I have a trolley jack that looks like this:
Image
Yeah see a jack like that I would not recommend lifting via the pinch weld directly. That's a recipe for bending it up, lol. Narrow/small saddle on light-duty jacks like that is not at all ideal to lift via the pinchweld. Def use an adapter if one will fit (might not find ones that work with that jack) or jack up elsewhere.
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CaptSmethwick wrote: That's the issue with pinch welds - the groove in the scissor jack doesn't damage the car's pinch weld's metal tongue because the pressure point is moved to either side of the tongue when the scissor jack is used. Trolley jacks don't have that groove so their pressure point is directly on the tongue and they will definitely damage the pinch weld without an adapter. I learned this the hard way years ago and learned to run hockey pucks through my table saw to make adapters - and have never had problems with jacking using trolley jacks since.

I will concede that hockey pucks are not perfect adapters as they are about 1-2 cms too shallow for the job.
I also made my own pinch weld adapter from a hockey puck. I don't have a table saw. Just used a hand saw. It works perfectly for me. Not too shallow at all.
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On your floor trolly jack, you can remove the jack pad and replace with one that fit it. Problem is finding one that fits. What I did was I bought oversized pad and shaved it. Now you don't have problem with slippage, only if and when the rubber pad will crack in half. Time will tell.

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