Travel

Limit to Power Bank on Flights

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 20th, 2019 3:22 pm
[OP]
Member
User avatar
Jan 8, 2015
226 posts
172 upvotes
Mississauga

Limit to Power Bank on Flights

This happened to my dad few months ago. He has a 26,000 mah power bank that he took with him to Egypt. On the return flight they told him there was a 20,000 mah limit regulation for power banks and it would be disposed of. As I was planning on buying him a new one and one for my sister (visiting from Australia), I'd like to get them the proper battery limit but I was unable to find anything on EgyptAirs site about this.

Was this just corruption or just at the discretion of security at airports.
5 replies
Newbie
Dec 17, 2017
89 posts
51 upvotes
Each airline / airport / country etc can make their own rules, many follow the IATA guidance https://www.iata.org/whatwedo/cargo/dgr ... attery.pdf which specify under 100 watt hours. Most lithium cells are 3.7v so a 26,000 mah pack using 3.7v cells should have been allowed under IATA guidance (its 96.2 Wh.) You may have to contact the airline to get more details if they have a stricter policy.
Deal Expert
User avatar
May 10, 2005
33542 posts
7539 upvotes
Ottawa
This is all the result of the cell phones that were catching fire. Airlines became (and right,y so) paranoid about batteries. Each airline has different rules with these.
The Government cannot give to anybody anything that the Government does not first take from somebody else.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 15, 2006
8283 posts
2567 upvotes
Toronto
If the airline says 20,000 is the limit and you are over, you are over. Don't argue with the airline and bring something within their limit.

Airlines, and us, don't want batteries catching fire in their planes.
Deal Addict
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Jun 29, 2010
1259 posts
438 upvotes
Haha at "disposed of". Likely the security guard needed a new one.
Deal Guru
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Jun 12, 2007
14213 posts
3557 upvotes
London
stacksonstacks wrote:
Jun 19th, 2019 11:29 am
Each airline / airport / country etc can make their own rules, many follow the IATA guidance https://www.iata.org/whatwedo/cargo/dgr ... attery.pdf which specify under 100 watt hours. Most lithium cells are 3.7v so a 26,000 mah pack using 3.7v cells should have been allowed under IATA guidance (its 96.2 Wh.) You may have to contact the airline to get more details if they have a stricter policy.
+1, 100 watt hours is the limit but a lot of people convert to mAH incorrectly because they think the pack output is the same as the battery output =5VDC ( which gives the supposed 20,000 mAH). The actual internal battery is really 3.7 VDC which is where 26000 mAH comes from

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